As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in Jacksonville

As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in JacksonvilleWith coronavirus cases exploding in Florida, the president now says he is “flexible” on plans to hold a large-scale, indoor Republican National Convention next month.


An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violation

An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violationThe Austin Police Department defended the officer's conduct, saying he followed the department's regulations and that no female officer was available.


Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'

Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'Mexico on Wednesday posted a fresh record for new coronavirus cases reported on a single day, with 6,995 infections, overtaking Spain to register the world's eighth highest case count, according to a Reuters tally. Despite the soaring figures, Mexico's coronavirus czar, Hugo Lopez-Gatell, said the pandemic was "slowing." The figures pushed Mexico's overall tally of infections to 275,003 cases.


Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China fury

Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China furyAustralia offered pathways to permanent residency for thousands of people from Hong Kong on Thursday in response to China's crackdown on dissent, drawing a furious reply from Beijing. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said his government was suspending its extradition agreement with the city and, in addition to extending the visas of 10,000 Hong Kongers already in the country, threw open the door to thousands more wanting to start a new life Down Under. Morrison said the decisions were taken in response to China's imposition last week of a tough new security law in Hong Kong, which he said "constitutes a fundamental change of circumstances" for the semi-autonomous territory.


Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school says

Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school saysThe new cases could impact the fall semester.


Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million people

Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million peopleJack Dorsey's fellow Silicon Valley billionaires Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg think a universal basic income could help poor Americans, too.


Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of it

Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of itA man who flies a Nazi flag on the back of his car to show his opposition to Black Lives Matter protests and gay people, claims he was attacked last month because of it.Jesus Seineke, who lives in Alpine, San Diego, flies a Nazi flag on the back of his SUV when he drives around his local area.


Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'

Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'"It has been several weeks since Israel's compass for handling the pandemic has lost its bearings," wrote the public health director in her resignation.


Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in Kashmir

Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in KashmirA Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party politician was killed along with his brother and father in Indian administered Kashmir, officials said on Thursday. Wasim Bari, 38, and his family were attacked by militants at his residence in north Kashmir's Bandipora district on Wednesday night. All three were shot at point-blank range and died on the way to hospital. Authorities have arrested all 11 police personnel who were guarding him for dereliction of duties. Mr Bari's residence is a few meters away from the police station. This is the first attack on BJP workers in Kashmir after abrogation of Article 370 on August 5, 2019, when India stripped off the disputed region's autonomy. The killing of Mr Bari, who is survived by his wife and sister, has sent shock waves across political circles in Kashmir. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has condemned the attack.


Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unity

Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unityPolitical task forces Joe Biden formed with onetime rival Bernie Sanders to solidify support among the Democratic Party's progressive wing recommended Wednesday that the former vice president embrace major proposals to combat climate change and institutional racism while expanding health care coverage and rebuilding a coronavirus-ravaged economy. The groups, formed in May to tackle health care, immigration, education, criminal justice reform, climate change and the economy, sought to hammer out a policy road map to best defeat President Donald Trump.


Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research Groups

Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research GroupsFederal prosecutors allege that a top immunologist at Ohio State University illegally concealed Chinese funding for his research and attempted to flee the country before his arrest in Alaska in May.In a criminal complaint unsealed on Thursday, the Justice Department accuses Song Guo Zheng, the Ronald L. Whisler MD Chair in Rheumatology and Immunology at Ohio State’s medical school, of fraudulently obtaining federal grant funds from the National Institutes of Health and making false statements to investigators.Zheng, prosecutors say, obtained nearly $5 million in federal research grants without disclosing ties to Chinese entities and additional grant funds provided by them. The complaint and other filings in a federal court in Ohio indicate that Zheng has long been affiliated with Chinese research efforts called “Talent Plans” that U.S. officials have alleged are integral to Chinese government efforts to boost scientific and technological advancement in the country by having experts train and conduct research in the United States and elsewhere.According to prosecutors, Ohio State placed Zheng on administrative leave while it conducted its own investigation into those alleged omissions. Zheng, they say, quickly began making plans to return to his native China.Zheng’s attorneys have not directly responded to the allegations in court. But the transcript of his arraignment indicates that Zheng, a U.S. permanent resident, has denied the charges against him. “I understand” the charges, Zheng told the court through a translator, “but I disagree with all of them.”Ohio State confirmed that Zheng was an employee and said he’d been placed on unpaid leave, but declined to comment further. “Ohio State has been and continues to assist federal law enforcement authorities in every way possible,” a university spokesperson told The Daily Beast in an email. “We cannot comment further at this time due to the ongoing law enforcement investigation.”The U.S. Attorney’s office in the Southern District of Ohio declined to comment when The Daily Beast first inquired about the Alaska arrest in late May. However, they provided a statement on Thursday after the criminal complaint was unsealed.“We allege that Zheng was preparing to flee the country after he learned that his employer had begun an administrative process into whether or not he was complying with rules governing taxpayer-funded grants,” said David M. DeVillers, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. “This is our office’s third recent case involving the illegal transfer of intellectual property and research to China. This underscores our commitment to work with the FBI, the Department of Health and Human Services, and our research institutions to protect our country’s position as a global leader in research and innovation, and to punish those who try to exploit and undermine that position.”  A lawyer for Zheng did not respond to repeated requests for information. Efforts to reach Zheng personally were not successful.Zheng’s case is just the latest federal prosecution of a U.S. academic whom the DOJ alleges had undisclosed ties to Chinese interests or funders. The department has also recently gone after researchers at Harvard University and the University of Kansas. In public remarks this week, the FBI Director Chris Wray stated, “We’ve now reached the point where the FBI is opening a new China-related counterintelligence case about every 10 hours.”Prosecutors say Zheng’s case revolves around a failure to disclose Chinese funding in grant applications during his time at OSU and at two previous jobs at the University of Southern California and Pennsylvania State University.Zheng “had received numerous admonishments from both NIH and OSU regarding conflicts of interest, and I believe he failed to disclose his overseas activities because he knew they placed his NIH funding at risk,” an FBI agent investigating the case told the court. According to prosecutors, Zheng gave conflicting answers when asked if he was involved with China’s Talent Plan programs. Zheng told a law enforcement interviewed that he “had been recruited into the PRC talent plans but he did not accept the position because he did not want to spend nine months of the year in the PRC.” But later in the interview, he appeared to acknowledge his participation, saying “he did not know he had to report his affiliation with talent plans.”According to the criminal complaint, OSU notified Zheng of its administrative investigation in mid-May. Six days later, prosecutors say, he left Columbus, “contacted a friend and was afforded a seat on a charter flight back to the PRC and packed up numerous electronic devices and a significant amount of personal items.” Prosecutors also presented evidence that Zheng and his wife planned to sell their house in Ohio.Prosecutors characterized that as an attempt by Zheng to flee the country. He was stopped at the Ted Stevens airport in Alaska. Zheng allegedly used his Chinese passport to board the flight and when the plane was deboarded, he quickly gave his carry-on luggage to a passenger he did not know. “When confronted,” prosecutors said, “Zheng initially indicated he was moving permanently, then changed his story to indicate he was visiting a sick relative and later added he was looking for a job in the PRC.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college

Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college	Raw video: Pam Shriver says her late husband met Trump after he was already enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania.


Explosion heard in western Tehran: Iran state media
Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in Florida

Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in FloridaVice President Mike Pence on Wednesday said the White House coronavirus task force sees signs COVID-19 prevention measures are working in Florida.


The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet

The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet"I'm obviously deeply concerned about...the ability of our healthcare system to respond to this increase in cases," Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said.


Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'

Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'An Ohio sheriff said he won't enforce Governor Mike DeWine's order making face masks mandatory in states with high rates of Covid-19 infections.Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones appeared on CNN Wednesday and told anchor Brianna Keilar that while he wears a mask and is "good with that," he has no plans on enforcing the governor's mask order.


'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job

'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job"He absolutely does not represent our values and no longer works at our agency," the CEO of Ted Todd Insurance said Tuesday.


15 Platform Beds to Elevate Your Bedroom Style
Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden

Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden"Whoah," the host said after a Trump spokesman claimed Biden "coaxed children up onto his porch during quarantine" and "children love his leg hair."


Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man

Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man
      Two men, one from Philadelphia and another from Delaware County, were killed during a lightning storm in northern Pennsylvania.


The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’

The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’The leader of Florida’s biggest sham “church” network peddling bleach as a miracle drug says he’s camped out in Colombia while his sons face arrest for allegedly selling a fake COVID-19 cure and threatening a judge with a “Waco”-style standoff.For years, the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing has been at the center of a lucrative, world-wide network that claims—falsely—that drinking glorified Clorox can cure you of virtually any illness. The “church” (which is not religious, by its own admission) has raked in the cash promoting “Miracle Mineral Solution,” a bleach solution first popularized in 2006 by an ex-Scientologist who claimed to be an alien god. Ludicrous as the scheme sounds, it’s seen a recent surge in visibility, gaining endorsements from conspiracy theorists and well-known conservatives. Now, four members of the family behind Genesis II are facing criminal charges for allegedly flouting an order to stop marketing MMS as a COVID-19 cure. Two have been arrested, while the family patriarch says he’s out of the country.Genesis II isn’t a real church. You can’t worship at a physical location, and its leader, “Archbishop” Mark Grenon, is not actually ordained. Instead, it’s a network of people peddling sodium chlorite, a bleach compound that the Food and Drug Administration warned in 2019 “can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration.” Nevertheless, Genesis II has thrived in recent years. The church’s founder, Jim Humble, is a former Scientologist who claims to be a billion-year-old space god from another galaxy. Humble worked with Genesis II for years, before appearing to back away from the church after an ABC News investigation. QAnon-ers’ Magic Cure for Coronavirus: Just Drink Bleach!"There are certainly times I have said some things that I probably should have said differently,” he wrote in a 2016 blog post. “For lack of a better way to express things at the time— or because others put words in my mouth, in the past I have stated that MMS cures most of all diseases. Today, I say that MMS cures nothing!"The revelation didn’t stop Mark Grenon and his sons Joseph, Jordan, and Jonathan from peddling bleach. The family and their “church” raked it in for years, media investigations and criminal charges show. In one investigation, an undercover news crew attended one of Grenon’s $450 MMS seminars in a California hotel. There, Grenon hinted at the church’s lack of real religious convictions.“Everybody start a church and do it from there. You can sell them anything! Tell them Jesus heals you while you drink this,” Grenon said.Federal investigators apparently pursued those claims as the basis of a fraud charge. In a February 2020 interview, cited in the criminal complaint, Grenon told investigators he’d started a church in order to sell MMS.“Everything you do commercially is under the Universal Commercial code, okay?” Grenon said, according to the complaint. “A church is completely separate from that code, statutes, and laws. That’s why a priest can give a kid wine in church publicly and not get arrested. Because it’s a sacrament.[…] I knew this because . . . they tried to arrest us for proclaiming stuff on the street in Boston. They threw it out of court because we’re a church. You can’t arrest us from doing one of our sacraments, and I knew this. So that’s why . . . I said let’s do a church. We could have done temple. We could have done synagogue. We could have done mosque.” “So [the founding of Genesis] wasn’t really about religion?” the investigator asked. “It was in order to – to in a way, legalize the use of MMS?”“Right,” Grenon replied. “It wasn’t at all religious.” (On its website, Genesis II claims to be “non-religious but spiritual.”)Although the criminal complaint indicates Genesis II and the Grenons were under investigation by at least October 2019 (when they allegedly gave an undercover FDA investigator terrible cancer treatment advice), federal scrutiny on the church intensified when it started promoting MMS as a coronavirus cure. The FDA sent Genesis II an injunction, telling them to please stop doing that. But the church allegedly continued, advertising “testimonials” that promoted potentially virus-spreading activity. One reviewer, featured in a Genesis II newsletter, claimed to have “traveled to the Philippines and had to pass through Seoul, Korea and Tokyo, Japan airports where just about everyone was wearing the masks for coronavirus. We had no fear (and no masks) because we had MMS protection. We are back home and everyone is still healthy.”The Grenons also allegedly made violent threats against the judge who signed the injunction. In an April podcast, Mark Grenon and his son Joseph stated that they would not obey the restraining order.“You’ve got the 2nd [Amendment]. Right? When Congress does immoral things, passes immoral laws, that’s when you pick up guns, right?,” one said. “You want a Waco? Do they want a Waco?” In a later podcast, Grenon accused the judge of “treason,” and in a third podcast warned that the judge “could be taken out.”Grenon and his three sons were charged with “conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.” Their Bradenton, Florida headquarters were raided on Wednesday, and Jordan and Johnathan arrested. It was not immediately clear whether either had lawyers.Mark Grenon, meanwhile, was at large as of Thursday morning. Genesis II has associates worldwide, particularly in Africa and South America. (Genesis II and other bleach sellers have faced particular scrutiny for giving bleach to African children.) None of the seven Genesis II chapters in the U.S., Canada, or Colombia that listed their phone numbers online answered the phone or returned The Daily Beast’s calls.In an “emergency” interview with the founder of a conspiracy theory-laden “health news” site after the raid, Grenon revealed that he was in Colombia, where he expected to be arrested and extradited.Questioned by an interviewer who called the FDA a “terrorist organization,” Grenon stuck to his old argument that Genesis II was a legitimate religious organization.“The FDA says we should stop giving our sacraments to the world. We just basically said no, we have the First Amendment,” he said. “It says we have free exercise of our religious beliefs.”Asked about his bleach’s medical validity, Grenon described MMS as “so real. I had projectile vomiting from bad sushi. I took it and within a couple of minutes, gone.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over police

New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over policeNew York Attorney General Letitia James recommended that New York City's mayor give up sole control over the city police commissioner's hiring, in a preliminary report released on Wednesday on her investigation into the policing of recent protests. "There should be an entirely new accountability structure for NYPD," James said in her report, which also recommended giving more power to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, a city agency that reviews police misconduct.


Wisconsin police officer rescues dog from burning house
US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buy

US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buyJapan is set to become the fourth operator of the F-35B short takeoff and landing variant.


Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-ahead

Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-aheadTexas has executed its first death row inmate since it first confirmed a case of coronavirus after a Supreme Court ruling allowed his execution to go ahead.Billy Joe Wardlow, 45, was sentenced to death in 1993 for a robbery and murder in which he and his girlfriend tried to rob 82-year-old Carl Cole of his truck using a .45-calibre gun. Mr Wardlow fired the gun in a struggle, and Cole was killed; the couple were arrested two days later.


If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollars

If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollarsSix states had half the international student enrollment.


Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentence

Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentenceA former Indian naval officer on death row in Pakistan for alleged spying has refused to lodge an appeal against his conviction and will try instead for a military pardon, an official said Wednesday. Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav was arrested in 2016 in Pakistan's restive southwestern province of Balochistan -- a region where Islamabad has long accused New Delhi of backing separatist rebels.


Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say

Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say“Some people are very passionate about their opinions.”


Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leaders

Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leadersThe Confederacy "was an act of treason at the time against the Union, against the Stars and Stripes, against the US Constitution," Gen. Mark Milley said.


El Salvador murder rate plummets; study says gangs may have informal pact with government
University of California names first Black president

University of California names first Black presidentMichael Drake will be the first black president in the university system's 152-year history.


Virginia eliminates huge backlog of untested rape kits
GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ Proposal

GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ ProposalRepublican senators are piecing together an additional coronavirus aid package to counter House Democrats' phase-4 aid proposal.The GOP bill in its current form will provide an additional $1.3 trillion in economic aid to U.S. taxpayers and businesses, CNN reported on Wednesday evening. House Democrats have already proposed their own $3 trillion aid package, however Senate Republicans have pushed back on the high price tag."It won’t be $3 trillion. That bill is not going anywhere," Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said on Wednesday. The GOP proposal will likely include aid to schools, hospitals, and businesses, along with liability protections for companies.The Republican caucus has urged caution when passing additional aid packages, preferring to study the effects of previous legislation to make sure the aid is effective in keeping the U.S. economy afloat. McConnell said that talks with Democrats on a new round of aid would be more difficult "because of the proximity to the election.""It is unclear to me right now how we will resolve several contentious issues," Senator Chris Coons (D., Conn.) told CNN, echoing McConnell. "It's going to be a rough road. There are a lot of competing interests. A lot."House Democrats may also piece together an infrastructure spending bill to offset some of the economic effects of the pandemic. The idea for an infrastructure bill has received support from Republicans including President Trump, as well as Senators Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), Roy Blunt (R., Mo.), and Roger Wicker (R., Miss.).


NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quit

NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quitThe New York Police Department (NYPD) has reportedly limited the number of retirement applications it will allow, after it saw a surge in requests in the last couple of months.The NYPD announced on Wednesday that 179 officers filed for retirement between 29 June and 6 July – a 411 per cent increase on the 35 who retired in the same time period in 2019.


These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.

These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.An Arizona teacher is dead after contracting COVID-19. Two others tested positive after teaching in the same classroom. They hope schools stay closed.


Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker

Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker'The biggest determining factor of whether you live around toxicity is the color of your skin'


DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissal

DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissalThe U.S. District Court judge who oversaw the criminal case of President Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn has requested a full appeals court review after a three-judge panel ordered him to dismiss it. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan made the highly unusual the request Thursday. A three-judge panel last month ordered Sullivan to dismiss the case against Flynn, following the Justice Department's extraordinary decision to drop the prosecution.


Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump

Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump	New York Times opinion writer Tom Friedman says Biden should refuse to debate Trump unless he releases his tax returns; Jacqui Heinrich reports.


Bosnian Serb government indoctrinating children over Srebrenica, U.N. tribunal head says
The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on Amazon

The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on AmazonA minor nuisance that comes with U.S. sanctions is having to say goodbye to buying on Amazon.


Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for life

Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for lifeAn opposition governor was detained and several activists had their homes raided by the police on Thursday as Russia’s latest crackdown on dissent gathers momentum. The flurry of arrests and criminal inquiries follow last week’s vote in which nearly 78 percent endorsed constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay as president at least until 2036 when he turns 83. Sergei Furgal, the governor of the Khabarovsk region in Russia’s Far East who beat a Kremlin candidate at the 2018 election, was arrested by camouflaged agents of Russia’s top investigative body on Thursday morning and put on a plane to Moscow. The popular governor whose landslide win at the polls embarrassed the pro-Kremlin party, is accused of organising two contract killings as well as an attempted murder 15 years ago, according to the Investigative Committee, Russia's main federal investigating authority. Mr Furgal has not been charged with any crime. An unnamed source claiming to be linked to Mr Furgal says he has denied the allegations. Mr Furgal had been in Russian parliament for more than a decade before he won the Khabarovsk election in 2018, which has raised questions about the timing of the charges brought against him.


Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education system

Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education systemThe US needs an education system that informs students about the world around them, retired Navy Adm. William McRaven said.


'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returns

'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returnsThe pandemic is creating the social conditions – no jobs, isolation, despair – that helped enable the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place. Now it’s backIn West Virginia, they are bracing for the second wave.The epidemic that hit the Appalachian state harder than any other in the US finally looked to be in retreat. Now it’s advancing again. Not coronavirus but opioid overdoses, with one scourge driving a resurgence of the other.Covid-19 has claimed 93 lives in West Virginia over the past three months. That is only a fraction of those killed by drug overdoses, which caused nearly 1,000 deaths in the state in 2018 alone, mostly from opioids but also methamphetamine (also known as meth).That year was better than the one before as the Appalachian state appeared to turn the tide on an epidemic that has ravaged the region for two decades, destroying lives, tearing apart families and dragging down local economies.Now coronavirus looks to be undoing the advances made against a drug epidemic that has claimed close to 600,000 lives in the US over the past two decades. Worse, it is also laying the ground for a long-term resurgence of addiction by exacerbating many of the conditions, including unemployment, low incomes and isolation, that contributed to the rise of the opioid epidemic and “deaths of despair”.“The number of opioid overdoses is skyrocketing and I don’t think it will be easily turned back,” said Dr Mike Brumage, former director of the West Virginia office of drug control policy.“Once the tsunami of Covid-19 finally recedes, we’re going to be left with the social conditions that enabled the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place, and those are not going to go away.”To Brumage and others, coronavirus has also shown what can happen when the government takes a public health emergency seriously, unlike the opioid epidemic, which was largely ignored even as the death toll climbed into the hundreds of thousands.The American Medical Association said it was “greatly concerned” at reported increases in opioid overdoses in more than 30 states although it will be months before hard data is available.> Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection> > Dr Mike BrumagePublic health officials from Kentucky to Florida, Texas and Colorado have recorded surges in opioid deaths as the economic and social anxieties created by the Covid-19 pandemic prove fertile ground for addiction. In addition, Brumage said significant numbers of people have fallen out of treatment programmes as support networks have been yanked away by social distancing orders.“I’m a firm adherent to the idea that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, the opposite of addiction is connection. Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection,” he said.“Many of the people who were using the programme either didn’t have broadband or they didn’t have cellphone service, especially those who were homeless. They just fell out of the programme,” he said.The resurgence was not unforeseen. In March, as Covid-19 escalated, Donald Trump warned about the human toll beyond lives claimed by the virus. “You’re going to have tremendous suicides, but you know what you’re going to have more than anything else? Drug addiction. You will see drugs being used like nobody has ever used them before. And people are going to be dying all over the place from drug addiction,” he said.Brumage and others who spoke to the Guardian were at pains to say they believed the scale of the government’s response to Covid-19 is necessary. But they saw the mobilisation of financial resources and political will to cope with the virus in stark contrast to the response of successive administrations to the opioid epidemic.Emily Walden lost her son to an opioid overdose and now heads Fed Up!, a group campaigning to reduce the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing levels.“Congress immediately acted with coronavirus to help those that lost their jobs, to make sure that people were taken care of and it was addressed properly,” she said. “Look at the difference with the opioid epidemic, which has largely been ignored by our federal government for 20 years.”While the US government has thrown $6tn at coronavirus, the Trump administration dedicated just $6bn to directly dealing with opioid addiction over his first two years in office even though about the same number of people died of drug overdoses in that period as have now been lost to Covid-19.Brumage said federal health institutions have shifted their focus to coronavirus, including freezing a $1bn research project to find less addictive pain treatments.> You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous> > Dr Mike Brumage“It’s robbed the oxygen out of the room and made it the sole focus of what’s happening,” said Brumage. “There’s also a fatigue about the opioid crisis. You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous, but it’s not happening at the same speed and scale as the coronavirus is having right now.” Brumage attributes the difference in response in part to attitudes toward drug addiction.“The difference between getting Covid and dying of an overdose is stigma around drug use. This has been ingrained across the United States – that people using drugs are somehow seen as morally deficient and so it becomes easier then to other and alienate those people,” he said.Walden does not accept that explanation. Like many whose families have been devastated by opioids, she sees a personal and public health catastrophe perpetuated by the financial and political power of the pharmaceutical industry to drive the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing rates which were a major factor in driving the epidemic.“This comes down to lobbyists and money. People say it’s stigma and it’s not. There is stigma but it’s about profits and greed,” she said.Dr Raeford Brown, a former chair of the Food and Drug Administration’s opioid advisory committee, is a longstanding critic of drug industry influence over opioid medical policy and the government’s response to the epidemic. He sees a parallel with coronavirus with US states lifting strong social distancing orders too early under corporate pressure.“The United States is not good at doing public health,” he said. “It failed the test with opioids and it failed the test with viral pandemics. But coronavirus and pandemics, and the things like the opioid crisis, are much more likely to get us than the Russians or the Chinese are.”


Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow Republican

Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow RepublicanPro-Trump internet personality Omar Navarro emerged from a six-month stint in jail on a stalking charge last month, and immediately registered to run for Congress. Navarro, a perennial challenger to Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), has registered to run for her seat again in 2022—assuming, perhaps logically, that Waters will once again prevail in her re-election request this November. But Navarro, who had nearly $50,000 in his campaign bank account as of March 31 even while he served his jail term, is not going to wait for those results before getting involved. He told The Daily Beast that he’s going to send out mailers this election cycle denouncing Joe Collins, the Republican nominee currently running against Waters.“Hey, I don’t agree with him,” Navarro told The Daily Beast. “I believe Maxine Waters is better than him.”Asked for comment on Navarro’s sour-grapes scheme to ruin Collins’s already slim chances of winning this fall, Collins responded  by accusing Navarro of having “daddy issues” without elaborating. "Omar Navarro is a joke,” Collins told The Daily Beast. “He has the mentality of a four year old child throwing a temper tantrum and the testicular fortitude of a mouse.” A Perennial Congressional Candidate Beloved by Trump World Was Just Arrested on Stalking ChargesThe scrapping between Collins and Navarro for the chance to lose to Waters highlights the odd incentives facing Republican challengers taking on famous incumbents in heavily Democratic districts. Running against Waters as a Republican would be a poor choice for anyone who actually wants to win. Indeed, Navarro has tried twice already, losing by more than 50 percentage points in 2016 and 2018. But for a GOPer interested in raising millions off of Waters’s notoriety as a devoted Trump foe, and increasing his profile in the pro-Trump mediasphere, it works out great. Navarro raked in donations from low-dollar contributors and saw his stature on the online Trump right explode thanks to his quixotic earlier campaigns. Even the candidates themselves acknowledge the money that’s at stake for whoever wins the right to face off against Waters. “The main reason Navarro is upset is because he's used to living off of his campaign donations and now he's facing the realization that, after being beaten by a real candidate with a shot at winning, he has to find a real job,” Collins said in his email. For Navarro, that time in the bright lights of online Trumpy fame came to a halt when he was arrested in December in San Francisco after stalking ex-girlfriend and fellow Republican personality DeAnna Lorraine Tesoriero, who herself was running a doomed campaign against Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Navarro eventually pleaded guilty to a stalking charge, and was sentenced to six months in San Francisco’s jail, where he claims to have lost 30 pounds. Even while imprisoned in San Francisco, Navarro kept up his political profile. And he stayed on the ballot, losing the March Republican primary to Collins by a mere 250 votes—a 0.3 percent difference in the vote total. Undeterred by that loss, Navarro has tried to recast himself since being released from jail as the latest victim of deep-state prosecutors. While other Trump supporters who faced criminal charges were involved in international intrigue, however, Navarro has been faced with claiming that he was arrested on a local stalking charge because of some secret government scheme. “Full disclosure with you guys: in the past six months, yes, I have been in a county jail,” Navarro told his more than 250,000 Twitter followers after being released from jail. Despite overwhelming evidence that Navarro violated Tesoriero’s restraining order against him, including the fact that Navarro bashed Tesoriero to The Daily Beast in apparent violation of the order, Navarro claims that he only pleaded guilty because he would have become a “political prisoner” if he hadn’t.“I wouldn’t have been judged by a jury of my peers, I would’ve been judged by a bunch of liberals, and they would have kept me locked up in there as a political prisoner,” Navarro said in his Twitter video. “And that’s not OK.” While it might seem strange for the recently imprisoned Navarro to be confident he can win the 2022 primary to challenge Waters, he is aided by the fact that Collins has a bizarre history of his own.A Navy veteran, Collins has continuously switched parties since 2016, cycling between being a Democrat, a Republican, a member of the Green Party, and a member of the “Millennial Political Party.” Collins has also filed a lawsuit over child support payments that is riddled with language echoing the nonsense legal language used by members of the far-right sovereign citizen movement. At one point in his lawsuit, in an apparent attempt to deploy a fringe legal theory, Collins claimed that his bodily fluids were worth $15 million—a bizarre detail Navarro has seized on in his campaign to bring down his rival.   “You’re the guy that’s gonna take down Maxine Waters?” Navarro said in a video taunting Collins that he released in late June. “I’m sorry, but you’re not gonna do that. And by the way, your bodily fluids are not worth $15 million.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changed

I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changedThe hardest part of the challenge turned out to be mental instead of physical, senior lifestyle reporter Rachel Hosie found.


César Duarte: Fugitive Mexican ex-governor arrested in Miami

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Philadelphia waives 100s of protest-related code violations
India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign students

India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign studentsIndia has conveyed its concerns to the United States about a new immigration order that could force a large number of Indian students to return home, the foreign ministry said on Thursday. U.S. President Donald Trump's administration issued a new rule this week that would bar foreign students from remaining in the United States if their universities are not holding in-person classes during the upcoming fall semester because of coronavirus. "We have urged the U.S. side that we need to keep in mind the role that educational exchanges and people to people relations have played in the development of our relations," Anurag Srivastava, spokesman at India's foreign ministry told a news conference.


Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops say

Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops sayPolice said one of the suspects tried to flee the scene.


In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rights

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As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in Jacksonville

As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in JacksonvilleWith coronavirus cases exploding in Florida, the president now says he is “flexible” on plans to hold a large-scale, indoor Republican National Convention next month.


An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violation

An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violationThe Austin Police Department defended the officer's conduct, saying he followed the department's regulations and that no female officer was available.


Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'

Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'Mexico on Wednesday posted a fresh record for new coronavirus cases reported on a single day, with 6,995 infections, overtaking Spain to register the world's eighth highest case count, according to a Reuters tally. Despite the soaring figures, Mexico's coronavirus czar, Hugo Lopez-Gatell, said the pandemic was "slowing." The figures pushed Mexico's overall tally of infections to 275,003 cases.


Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China fury

Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China furyAustralia offered pathways to permanent residency for thousands of people from Hong Kong on Thursday in response to China's crackdown on dissent, drawing a furious reply from Beijing. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said his government was suspending its extradition agreement with the city and, in addition to extending the visas of 10,000 Hong Kongers already in the country, threw open the door to thousands more wanting to start a new life Down Under. Morrison said the decisions were taken in response to China's imposition last week of a tough new security law in Hong Kong, which he said "constitutes a fundamental change of circumstances" for the semi-autonomous territory.


Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school says

Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school saysThe new cases could impact the fall semester.


Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million people

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Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of it

Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of itA man who flies a Nazi flag on the back of his car to show his opposition to Black Lives Matter protests and gay people, claims he was attacked last month because of it.Jesus Seineke, who lives in Alpine, San Diego, flies a Nazi flag on the back of his SUV when he drives around his local area.


Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'

Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'"It has been several weeks since Israel's compass for handling the pandemic has lost its bearings," wrote the public health director in her resignation.


Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in Kashmir

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Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unity

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Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research Groups

Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research GroupsFederal prosecutors allege that a top immunologist at Ohio State University illegally concealed Chinese funding for his research and attempted to flee the country before his arrest in Alaska in May.In a criminal complaint unsealed on Thursday, the Justice Department accuses Song Guo Zheng, the Ronald L. Whisler MD Chair in Rheumatology and Immunology at Ohio State’s medical school, of fraudulently obtaining federal grant funds from the National Institutes of Health and making false statements to investigators.Zheng, prosecutors say, obtained nearly $5 million in federal research grants without disclosing ties to Chinese entities and additional grant funds provided by them. The complaint and other filings in a federal court in Ohio indicate that Zheng has long been affiliated with Chinese research efforts called “Talent Plans” that U.S. officials have alleged are integral to Chinese government efforts to boost scientific and technological advancement in the country by having experts train and conduct research in the United States and elsewhere.According to prosecutors, Ohio State placed Zheng on administrative leave while it conducted its own investigation into those alleged omissions. Zheng, they say, quickly began making plans to return to his native China.Zheng’s attorneys have not directly responded to the allegations in court. But the transcript of his arraignment indicates that Zheng, a U.S. permanent resident, has denied the charges against him. “I understand” the charges, Zheng told the court through a translator, “but I disagree with all of them.”Ohio State confirmed that Zheng was an employee and said he’d been placed on unpaid leave, but declined to comment further. “Ohio State has been and continues to assist federal law enforcement authorities in every way possible,” a university spokesperson told The Daily Beast in an email. “We cannot comment further at this time due to the ongoing law enforcement investigation.”The U.S. Attorney’s office in the Southern District of Ohio declined to comment when The Daily Beast first inquired about the Alaska arrest in late May. However, they provided a statement on Thursday after the criminal complaint was unsealed.“We allege that Zheng was preparing to flee the country after he learned that his employer had begun an administrative process into whether or not he was complying with rules governing taxpayer-funded grants,” said David M. DeVillers, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. “This is our office’s third recent case involving the illegal transfer of intellectual property and research to China. This underscores our commitment to work with the FBI, the Department of Health and Human Services, and our research institutions to protect our country’s position as a global leader in research and innovation, and to punish those who try to exploit and undermine that position.”  A lawyer for Zheng did not respond to repeated requests for information. Efforts to reach Zheng personally were not successful.Zheng’s case is just the latest federal prosecution of a U.S. academic whom the DOJ alleges had undisclosed ties to Chinese interests or funders. The department has also recently gone after researchers at Harvard University and the University of Kansas. In public remarks this week, the FBI Director Chris Wray stated, “We’ve now reached the point where the FBI is opening a new China-related counterintelligence case about every 10 hours.”Prosecutors say Zheng’s case revolves around a failure to disclose Chinese funding in grant applications during his time at OSU and at two previous jobs at the University of Southern California and Pennsylvania State University.Zheng “had received numerous admonishments from both NIH and OSU regarding conflicts of interest, and I believe he failed to disclose his overseas activities because he knew they placed his NIH funding at risk,” an FBI agent investigating the case told the court. According to prosecutors, Zheng gave conflicting answers when asked if he was involved with China’s Talent Plan programs. Zheng told a law enforcement interviewed that he “had been recruited into the PRC talent plans but he did not accept the position because he did not want to spend nine months of the year in the PRC.” But later in the interview, he appeared to acknowledge his participation, saying “he did not know he had to report his affiliation with talent plans.”According to the criminal complaint, OSU notified Zheng of its administrative investigation in mid-May. Six days later, prosecutors say, he left Columbus, “contacted a friend and was afforded a seat on a charter flight back to the PRC and packed up numerous electronic devices and a significant amount of personal items.” Prosecutors also presented evidence that Zheng and his wife planned to sell their house in Ohio.Prosecutors characterized that as an attempt by Zheng to flee the country. He was stopped at the Ted Stevens airport in Alaska. Zheng allegedly used his Chinese passport to board the flight and when the plane was deboarded, he quickly gave his carry-on luggage to a passenger he did not know. “When confronted,” prosecutors said, “Zheng initially indicated he was moving permanently, then changed his story to indicate he was visiting a sick relative and later added he was looking for a job in the PRC.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college

Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college	Raw video: Pam Shriver says her late husband met Trump after he was already enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania.


Explosion heard in western Tehran: Iran state media
Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in Florida

Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in FloridaVice President Mike Pence on Wednesday said the White House coronavirus task force sees signs COVID-19 prevention measures are working in Florida.


The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet

The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet"I'm obviously deeply concerned about...the ability of our healthcare system to respond to this increase in cases," Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said.


Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'

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'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job

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15 Platform Beds to Elevate Your Bedroom Style
Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden

Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden"Whoah," the host said after a Trump spokesman claimed Biden "coaxed children up onto his porch during quarantine" and "children love his leg hair."


Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man

Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man
      Two men, one from Philadelphia and another from Delaware County, were killed during a lightning storm in northern Pennsylvania.


The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’

The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’The leader of Florida’s biggest sham “church” network peddling bleach as a miracle drug says he’s camped out in Colombia while his sons face arrest for allegedly selling a fake COVID-19 cure and threatening a judge with a “Waco”-style standoff.For years, the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing has been at the center of a lucrative, world-wide network that claims—falsely—that drinking glorified Clorox can cure you of virtually any illness. The “church” (which is not religious, by its own admission) has raked in the cash promoting “Miracle Mineral Solution,” a bleach solution first popularized in 2006 by an ex-Scientologist who claimed to be an alien god. Ludicrous as the scheme sounds, it’s seen a recent surge in visibility, gaining endorsements from conspiracy theorists and well-known conservatives. Now, four members of the family behind Genesis II are facing criminal charges for allegedly flouting an order to stop marketing MMS as a COVID-19 cure. Two have been arrested, while the family patriarch says he’s out of the country.Genesis II isn’t a real church. You can’t worship at a physical location, and its leader, “Archbishop” Mark Grenon, is not actually ordained. Instead, it’s a network of people peddling sodium chlorite, a bleach compound that the Food and Drug Administration warned in 2019 “can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration.” Nevertheless, Genesis II has thrived in recent years. The church’s founder, Jim Humble, is a former Scientologist who claims to be a billion-year-old space god from another galaxy. Humble worked with Genesis II for years, before appearing to back away from the church after an ABC News investigation. QAnon-ers’ Magic Cure for Coronavirus: Just Drink Bleach!"There are certainly times I have said some things that I probably should have said differently,” he wrote in a 2016 blog post. “For lack of a better way to express things at the time— or because others put words in my mouth, in the past I have stated that MMS cures most of all diseases. Today, I say that MMS cures nothing!"The revelation didn’t stop Mark Grenon and his sons Joseph, Jordan, and Jonathan from peddling bleach. The family and their “church” raked it in for years, media investigations and criminal charges show. In one investigation, an undercover news crew attended one of Grenon’s $450 MMS seminars in a California hotel. There, Grenon hinted at the church’s lack of real religious convictions.“Everybody start a church and do it from there. You can sell them anything! Tell them Jesus heals you while you drink this,” Grenon said.Federal investigators apparently pursued those claims as the basis of a fraud charge. In a February 2020 interview, cited in the criminal complaint, Grenon told investigators he’d started a church in order to sell MMS.“Everything you do commercially is under the Universal Commercial code, okay?” Grenon said, according to the complaint. “A church is completely separate from that code, statutes, and laws. That’s why a priest can give a kid wine in church publicly and not get arrested. Because it’s a sacrament.[…] I knew this because . . . they tried to arrest us for proclaiming stuff on the street in Boston. They threw it out of court because we’re a church. You can’t arrest us from doing one of our sacraments, and I knew this. So that’s why . . . I said let’s do a church. We could have done temple. We could have done synagogue. We could have done mosque.” “So [the founding of Genesis] wasn’t really about religion?” the investigator asked. “It was in order to – to in a way, legalize the use of MMS?”“Right,” Grenon replied. “It wasn’t at all religious.” (On its website, Genesis II claims to be “non-religious but spiritual.”)Although the criminal complaint indicates Genesis II and the Grenons were under investigation by at least October 2019 (when they allegedly gave an undercover FDA investigator terrible cancer treatment advice), federal scrutiny on the church intensified when it started promoting MMS as a coronavirus cure. The FDA sent Genesis II an injunction, telling them to please stop doing that. But the church allegedly continued, advertising “testimonials” that promoted potentially virus-spreading activity. One reviewer, featured in a Genesis II newsletter, claimed to have “traveled to the Philippines and had to pass through Seoul, Korea and Tokyo, Japan airports where just about everyone was wearing the masks for coronavirus. We had no fear (and no masks) because we had MMS protection. We are back home and everyone is still healthy.”The Grenons also allegedly made violent threats against the judge who signed the injunction. In an April podcast, Mark Grenon and his son Joseph stated that they would not obey the restraining order.“You’ve got the 2nd [Amendment]. Right? When Congress does immoral things, passes immoral laws, that’s when you pick up guns, right?,” one said. “You want a Waco? Do they want a Waco?” In a later podcast, Grenon accused the judge of “treason,” and in a third podcast warned that the judge “could be taken out.”Grenon and his three sons were charged with “conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.” Their Bradenton, Florida headquarters were raided on Wednesday, and Jordan and Johnathan arrested. It was not immediately clear whether either had lawyers.Mark Grenon, meanwhile, was at large as of Thursday morning. Genesis II has associates worldwide, particularly in Africa and South America. (Genesis II and other bleach sellers have faced particular scrutiny for giving bleach to African children.) None of the seven Genesis II chapters in the U.S., Canada, or Colombia that listed their phone numbers online answered the phone or returned The Daily Beast’s calls.In an “emergency” interview with the founder of a conspiracy theory-laden “health news” site after the raid, Grenon revealed that he was in Colombia, where he expected to be arrested and extradited.Questioned by an interviewer who called the FDA a “terrorist organization,” Grenon stuck to his old argument that Genesis II was a legitimate religious organization.“The FDA says we should stop giving our sacraments to the world. We just basically said no, we have the First Amendment,” he said. “It says we have free exercise of our religious beliefs.”Asked about his bleach’s medical validity, Grenon described MMS as “so real. I had projectile vomiting from bad sushi. I took it and within a couple of minutes, gone.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over police

New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over policeNew York Attorney General Letitia James recommended that New York City's mayor give up sole control over the city police commissioner's hiring, in a preliminary report released on Wednesday on her investigation into the policing of recent protests. "There should be an entirely new accountability structure for NYPD," James said in her report, which also recommended giving more power to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, a city agency that reviews police misconduct.


Wisconsin police officer rescues dog from burning house
US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buy

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Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-ahead

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If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollars

If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollarsSix states had half the international student enrollment.


Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentence

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Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say

Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say“Some people are very passionate about their opinions.”


Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leaders

Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leadersThe Confederacy "was an act of treason at the time against the Union, against the Stars and Stripes, against the US Constitution," Gen. Mark Milley said.


El Salvador murder rate plummets; study says gangs may have informal pact with government
University of California names first Black president

University of California names first Black presidentMichael Drake will be the first black president in the university system's 152-year history.


Virginia eliminates huge backlog of untested rape kits
GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ Proposal

GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ ProposalRepublican senators are piecing together an additional coronavirus aid package to counter House Democrats' phase-4 aid proposal.The GOP bill in its current form will provide an additional $1.3 trillion in economic aid to U.S. taxpayers and businesses, CNN reported on Wednesday evening. House Democrats have already proposed their own $3 trillion aid package, however Senate Republicans have pushed back on the high price tag."It won’t be $3 trillion. That bill is not going anywhere," Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said on Wednesday. The GOP proposal will likely include aid to schools, hospitals, and businesses, along with liability protections for companies.The Republican caucus has urged caution when passing additional aid packages, preferring to study the effects of previous legislation to make sure the aid is effective in keeping the U.S. economy afloat. McConnell said that talks with Democrats on a new round of aid would be more difficult "because of the proximity to the election.""It is unclear to me right now how we will resolve several contentious issues," Senator Chris Coons (D., Conn.) told CNN, echoing McConnell. "It's going to be a rough road. There are a lot of competing interests. A lot."House Democrats may also piece together an infrastructure spending bill to offset some of the economic effects of the pandemic. The idea for an infrastructure bill has received support from Republicans including President Trump, as well as Senators Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), Roy Blunt (R., Mo.), and Roger Wicker (R., Miss.).


NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quit

NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quitThe New York Police Department (NYPD) has reportedly limited the number of retirement applications it will allow, after it saw a surge in requests in the last couple of months.The NYPD announced on Wednesday that 179 officers filed for retirement between 29 June and 6 July – a 411 per cent increase on the 35 who retired in the same time period in 2019.


These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.

These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.An Arizona teacher is dead after contracting COVID-19. Two others tested positive after teaching in the same classroom. They hope schools stay closed.


Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker

Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker'The biggest determining factor of whether you live around toxicity is the color of your skin'


DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissal

DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissalThe U.S. District Court judge who oversaw the criminal case of President Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn has requested a full appeals court review after a three-judge panel ordered him to dismiss it. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan made the highly unusual the request Thursday. A three-judge panel last month ordered Sullivan to dismiss the case against Flynn, following the Justice Department's extraordinary decision to drop the prosecution.


Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump

Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump	New York Times opinion writer Tom Friedman says Biden should refuse to debate Trump unless he releases his tax returns; Jacqui Heinrich reports.


Bosnian Serb government indoctrinating children over Srebrenica, U.N. tribunal head says
The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on Amazon

The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on AmazonA minor nuisance that comes with U.S. sanctions is having to say goodbye to buying on Amazon.


Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for life

Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for lifeAn opposition governor was detained and several activists had their homes raided by the police on Thursday as Russia’s latest crackdown on dissent gathers momentum. The flurry of arrests and criminal inquiries follow last week’s vote in which nearly 78 percent endorsed constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay as president at least until 2036 when he turns 83. Sergei Furgal, the governor of the Khabarovsk region in Russia’s Far East who beat a Kremlin candidate at the 2018 election, was arrested by camouflaged agents of Russia’s top investigative body on Thursday morning and put on a plane to Moscow. The popular governor whose landslide win at the polls embarrassed the pro-Kremlin party, is accused of organising two contract killings as well as an attempted murder 15 years ago, according to the Investigative Committee, Russia's main federal investigating authority. Mr Furgal has not been charged with any crime. An unnamed source claiming to be linked to Mr Furgal says he has denied the allegations. Mr Furgal had been in Russian parliament for more than a decade before he won the Khabarovsk election in 2018, which has raised questions about the timing of the charges brought against him.


Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education system

Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education systemThe US needs an education system that informs students about the world around them, retired Navy Adm. William McRaven said.


'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returns

'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returnsThe pandemic is creating the social conditions – no jobs, isolation, despair – that helped enable the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place. Now it’s backIn West Virginia, they are bracing for the second wave.The epidemic that hit the Appalachian state harder than any other in the US finally looked to be in retreat. Now it’s advancing again. Not coronavirus but opioid overdoses, with one scourge driving a resurgence of the other.Covid-19 has claimed 93 lives in West Virginia over the past three months. That is only a fraction of those killed by drug overdoses, which caused nearly 1,000 deaths in the state in 2018 alone, mostly from opioids but also methamphetamine (also known as meth).That year was better than the one before as the Appalachian state appeared to turn the tide on an epidemic that has ravaged the region for two decades, destroying lives, tearing apart families and dragging down local economies.Now coronavirus looks to be undoing the advances made against a drug epidemic that has claimed close to 600,000 lives in the US over the past two decades. Worse, it is also laying the ground for a long-term resurgence of addiction by exacerbating many of the conditions, including unemployment, low incomes and isolation, that contributed to the rise of the opioid epidemic and “deaths of despair”.“The number of opioid overdoses is skyrocketing and I don’t think it will be easily turned back,” said Dr Mike Brumage, former director of the West Virginia office of drug control policy.“Once the tsunami of Covid-19 finally recedes, we’re going to be left with the social conditions that enabled the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place, and those are not going to go away.”To Brumage and others, coronavirus has also shown what can happen when the government takes a public health emergency seriously, unlike the opioid epidemic, which was largely ignored even as the death toll climbed into the hundreds of thousands.The American Medical Association said it was “greatly concerned” at reported increases in opioid overdoses in more than 30 states although it will be months before hard data is available.> Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection> > Dr Mike BrumagePublic health officials from Kentucky to Florida, Texas and Colorado have recorded surges in opioid deaths as the economic and social anxieties created by the Covid-19 pandemic prove fertile ground for addiction. In addition, Brumage said significant numbers of people have fallen out of treatment programmes as support networks have been yanked away by social distancing orders.“I’m a firm adherent to the idea that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, the opposite of addiction is connection. Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection,” he said.“Many of the people who were using the programme either didn’t have broadband or they didn’t have cellphone service, especially those who were homeless. They just fell out of the programme,” he said.The resurgence was not unforeseen. In March, as Covid-19 escalated, Donald Trump warned about the human toll beyond lives claimed by the virus. “You’re going to have tremendous suicides, but you know what you’re going to have more than anything else? Drug addiction. You will see drugs being used like nobody has ever used them before. And people are going to be dying all over the place from drug addiction,” he said.Brumage and others who spoke to the Guardian were at pains to say they believed the scale of the government’s response to Covid-19 is necessary. But they saw the mobilisation of financial resources and political will to cope with the virus in stark contrast to the response of successive administrations to the opioid epidemic.Emily Walden lost her son to an opioid overdose and now heads Fed Up!, a group campaigning to reduce the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing levels.“Congress immediately acted with coronavirus to help those that lost their jobs, to make sure that people were taken care of and it was addressed properly,” she said. “Look at the difference with the opioid epidemic, which has largely been ignored by our federal government for 20 years.”While the US government has thrown $6tn at coronavirus, the Trump administration dedicated just $6bn to directly dealing with opioid addiction over his first two years in office even though about the same number of people died of drug overdoses in that period as have now been lost to Covid-19.Brumage said federal health institutions have shifted their focus to coronavirus, including freezing a $1bn research project to find less addictive pain treatments.> You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous> > Dr Mike Brumage“It’s robbed the oxygen out of the room and made it the sole focus of what’s happening,” said Brumage. “There’s also a fatigue about the opioid crisis. You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous, but it’s not happening at the same speed and scale as the coronavirus is having right now.” Brumage attributes the difference in response in part to attitudes toward drug addiction.“The difference between getting Covid and dying of an overdose is stigma around drug use. This has been ingrained across the United States – that people using drugs are somehow seen as morally deficient and so it becomes easier then to other and alienate those people,” he said.Walden does not accept that explanation. Like many whose families have been devastated by opioids, she sees a personal and public health catastrophe perpetuated by the financial and political power of the pharmaceutical industry to drive the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing rates which were a major factor in driving the epidemic.“This comes down to lobbyists and money. People say it’s stigma and it’s not. There is stigma but it’s about profits and greed,” she said.Dr Raeford Brown, a former chair of the Food and Drug Administration’s opioid advisory committee, is a longstanding critic of drug industry influence over opioid medical policy and the government’s response to the epidemic. He sees a parallel with coronavirus with US states lifting strong social distancing orders too early under corporate pressure.“The United States is not good at doing public health,” he said. “It failed the test with opioids and it failed the test with viral pandemics. But coronavirus and pandemics, and the things like the opioid crisis, are much more likely to get us than the Russians or the Chinese are.”


Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow Republican

Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow RepublicanPro-Trump internet personality Omar Navarro emerged from a six-month stint in jail on a stalking charge last month, and immediately registered to run for Congress. Navarro, a perennial challenger to Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), has registered to run for her seat again in 2022—assuming, perhaps logically, that Waters will once again prevail in her re-election request this November. But Navarro, who had nearly $50,000 in his campaign bank account as of March 31 even while he served his jail term, is not going to wait for those results before getting involved. He told The Daily Beast that he’s going to send out mailers this election cycle denouncing Joe Collins, the Republican nominee currently running against Waters.“Hey, I don’t agree with him,” Navarro told The Daily Beast. “I believe Maxine Waters is better than him.”Asked for comment on Navarro’s sour-grapes scheme to ruin Collins’s already slim chances of winning this fall, Collins responded  by accusing Navarro of having “daddy issues” without elaborating. "Omar Navarro is a joke,” Collins told The Daily Beast. “He has the mentality of a four year old child throwing a temper tantrum and the testicular fortitude of a mouse.” A Perennial Congressional Candidate Beloved by Trump World Was Just Arrested on Stalking ChargesThe scrapping between Collins and Navarro for the chance to lose to Waters highlights the odd incentives facing Republican challengers taking on famous incumbents in heavily Democratic districts. Running against Waters as a Republican would be a poor choice for anyone who actually wants to win. Indeed, Navarro has tried twice already, losing by more than 50 percentage points in 2016 and 2018. But for a GOPer interested in raising millions off of Waters’s notoriety as a devoted Trump foe, and increasing his profile in the pro-Trump mediasphere, it works out great. Navarro raked in donations from low-dollar contributors and saw his stature on the online Trump right explode thanks to his quixotic earlier campaigns. Even the candidates themselves acknowledge the money that’s at stake for whoever wins the right to face off against Waters. “The main reason Navarro is upset is because he's used to living off of his campaign donations and now he's facing the realization that, after being beaten by a real candidate with a shot at winning, he has to find a real job,” Collins said in his email. For Navarro, that time in the bright lights of online Trumpy fame came to a halt when he was arrested in December in San Francisco after stalking ex-girlfriend and fellow Republican personality DeAnna Lorraine Tesoriero, who herself was running a doomed campaign against Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Navarro eventually pleaded guilty to a stalking charge, and was sentenced to six months in San Francisco’s jail, where he claims to have lost 30 pounds. Even while imprisoned in San Francisco, Navarro kept up his political profile. And he stayed on the ballot, losing the March Republican primary to Collins by a mere 250 votes—a 0.3 percent difference in the vote total. Undeterred by that loss, Navarro has tried to recast himself since being released from jail as the latest victim of deep-state prosecutors. While other Trump supporters who faced criminal charges were involved in international intrigue, however, Navarro has been faced with claiming that he was arrested on a local stalking charge because of some secret government scheme. “Full disclosure with you guys: in the past six months, yes, I have been in a county jail,” Navarro told his more than 250,000 Twitter followers after being released from jail. Despite overwhelming evidence that Navarro violated Tesoriero’s restraining order against him, including the fact that Navarro bashed Tesoriero to The Daily Beast in apparent violation of the order, Navarro claims that he only pleaded guilty because he would have become a “political prisoner” if he hadn’t.“I wouldn’t have been judged by a jury of my peers, I would’ve been judged by a bunch of liberals, and they would have kept me locked up in there as a political prisoner,” Navarro said in his Twitter video. “And that’s not OK.” While it might seem strange for the recently imprisoned Navarro to be confident he can win the 2022 primary to challenge Waters, he is aided by the fact that Collins has a bizarre history of his own.A Navy veteran, Collins has continuously switched parties since 2016, cycling between being a Democrat, a Republican, a member of the Green Party, and a member of the “Millennial Political Party.” Collins has also filed a lawsuit over child support payments that is riddled with language echoing the nonsense legal language used by members of the far-right sovereign citizen movement. At one point in his lawsuit, in an apparent attempt to deploy a fringe legal theory, Collins claimed that his bodily fluids were worth $15 million—a bizarre detail Navarro has seized on in his campaign to bring down his rival.   “You’re the guy that’s gonna take down Maxine Waters?” Navarro said in a video taunting Collins that he released in late June. “I’m sorry, but you’re not gonna do that. And by the way, your bodily fluids are not worth $15 million.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changed

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In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rights

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As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in Jacksonville

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An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violation

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Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China fury

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Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school says

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Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million people

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Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of it

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Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research Groups

Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research GroupsFederal prosecutors allege that a top immunologist at Ohio State University illegally concealed Chinese funding for his research and attempted to flee the country before his arrest in Alaska in May.In a criminal complaint unsealed on Thursday, the Justice Department accuses Song Guo Zheng, the Ronald L. Whisler MD Chair in Rheumatology and Immunology at Ohio State’s medical school, of fraudulently obtaining federal grant funds from the National Institutes of Health and making false statements to investigators.Zheng, prosecutors say, obtained nearly $5 million in federal research grants without disclosing ties to Chinese entities and additional grant funds provided by them. The complaint and other filings in a federal court in Ohio indicate that Zheng has long been affiliated with Chinese research efforts called “Talent Plans” that U.S. officials have alleged are integral to Chinese government efforts to boost scientific and technological advancement in the country by having experts train and conduct research in the United States and elsewhere.According to prosecutors, Ohio State placed Zheng on administrative leave while it conducted its own investigation into those alleged omissions. Zheng, they say, quickly began making plans to return to his native China.Zheng’s attorneys have not directly responded to the allegations in court. But the transcript of his arraignment indicates that Zheng, a U.S. permanent resident, has denied the charges against him. “I understand” the charges, Zheng told the court through a translator, “but I disagree with all of them.”Ohio State confirmed that Zheng was an employee and said he’d been placed on unpaid leave, but declined to comment further. “Ohio State has been and continues to assist federal law enforcement authorities in every way possible,” a university spokesperson told The Daily Beast in an email. “We cannot comment further at this time due to the ongoing law enforcement investigation.”The U.S. Attorney’s office in the Southern District of Ohio declined to comment when The Daily Beast first inquired about the Alaska arrest in late May. However, they provided a statement on Thursday after the criminal complaint was unsealed.“We allege that Zheng was preparing to flee the country after he learned that his employer had begun an administrative process into whether or not he was complying with rules governing taxpayer-funded grants,” said David M. DeVillers, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. “This is our office’s third recent case involving the illegal transfer of intellectual property and research to China. This underscores our commitment to work with the FBI, the Department of Health and Human Services, and our research institutions to protect our country’s position as a global leader in research and innovation, and to punish those who try to exploit and undermine that position.”  A lawyer for Zheng did not respond to repeated requests for information. Efforts to reach Zheng personally were not successful.Zheng’s case is just the latest federal prosecution of a U.S. academic whom the DOJ alleges had undisclosed ties to Chinese interests or funders. The department has also recently gone after researchers at Harvard University and the University of Kansas. In public remarks this week, the FBI Director Chris Wray stated, “We’ve now reached the point where the FBI is opening a new China-related counterintelligence case about every 10 hours.”Prosecutors say Zheng’s case revolves around a failure to disclose Chinese funding in grant applications during his time at OSU and at two previous jobs at the University of Southern California and Pennsylvania State University.Zheng “had received numerous admonishments from both NIH and OSU regarding conflicts of interest, and I believe he failed to disclose his overseas activities because he knew they placed his NIH funding at risk,” an FBI agent investigating the case told the court. According to prosecutors, Zheng gave conflicting answers when asked if he was involved with China’s Talent Plan programs. Zheng told a law enforcement interviewed that he “had been recruited into the PRC talent plans but he did not accept the position because he did not want to spend nine months of the year in the PRC.” But later in the interview, he appeared to acknowledge his participation, saying “he did not know he had to report his affiliation with talent plans.”According to the criminal complaint, OSU notified Zheng of its administrative investigation in mid-May. Six days later, prosecutors say, he left Columbus, “contacted a friend and was afforded a seat on a charter flight back to the PRC and packed up numerous electronic devices and a significant amount of personal items.” Prosecutors also presented evidence that Zheng and his wife planned to sell their house in Ohio.Prosecutors characterized that as an attempt by Zheng to flee the country. He was stopped at the Ted Stevens airport in Alaska. Zheng allegedly used his Chinese passport to board the flight and when the plane was deboarded, he quickly gave his carry-on luggage to a passenger he did not know. “When confronted,” prosecutors said, “Zheng initially indicated he was moving permanently, then changed his story to indicate he was visiting a sick relative and later added he was looking for a job in the PRC.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college

Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college	Raw video: Pam Shriver says her late husband met Trump after he was already enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania.


Explosion heard in western Tehran: Iran state media
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The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’

The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’The leader of Florida’s biggest sham “church” network peddling bleach as a miracle drug says he’s camped out in Colombia while his sons face arrest for allegedly selling a fake COVID-19 cure and threatening a judge with a “Waco”-style standoff.For years, the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing has been at the center of a lucrative, world-wide network that claims—falsely—that drinking glorified Clorox can cure you of virtually any illness. The “church” (which is not religious, by its own admission) has raked in the cash promoting “Miracle Mineral Solution,” a bleach solution first popularized in 2006 by an ex-Scientologist who claimed to be an alien god. Ludicrous as the scheme sounds, it’s seen a recent surge in visibility, gaining endorsements from conspiracy theorists and well-known conservatives. Now, four members of the family behind Genesis II are facing criminal charges for allegedly flouting an order to stop marketing MMS as a COVID-19 cure. Two have been arrested, while the family patriarch says he’s out of the country.Genesis II isn’t a real church. You can’t worship at a physical location, and its leader, “Archbishop” Mark Grenon, is not actually ordained. Instead, it’s a network of people peddling sodium chlorite, a bleach compound that the Food and Drug Administration warned in 2019 “can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration.” Nevertheless, Genesis II has thrived in recent years. The church’s founder, Jim Humble, is a former Scientologist who claims to be a billion-year-old space god from another galaxy. Humble worked with Genesis II for years, before appearing to back away from the church after an ABC News investigation. QAnon-ers’ Magic Cure for Coronavirus: Just Drink Bleach!"There are certainly times I have said some things that I probably should have said differently,” he wrote in a 2016 blog post. “For lack of a better way to express things at the time— or because others put words in my mouth, in the past I have stated that MMS cures most of all diseases. Today, I say that MMS cures nothing!"The revelation didn’t stop Mark Grenon and his sons Joseph, Jordan, and Jonathan from peddling bleach. The family and their “church” raked it in for years, media investigations and criminal charges show. In one investigation, an undercover news crew attended one of Grenon’s $450 MMS seminars in a California hotel. There, Grenon hinted at the church’s lack of real religious convictions.“Everybody start a church and do it from there. You can sell them anything! Tell them Jesus heals you while you drink this,” Grenon said.Federal investigators apparently pursued those claims as the basis of a fraud charge. In a February 2020 interview, cited in the criminal complaint, Grenon told investigators he’d started a church in order to sell MMS.“Everything you do commercially is under the Universal Commercial code, okay?” Grenon said, according to the complaint. “A church is completely separate from that code, statutes, and laws. That’s why a priest can give a kid wine in church publicly and not get arrested. Because it’s a sacrament.[…] I knew this because . . . they tried to arrest us for proclaiming stuff on the street in Boston. They threw it out of court because we’re a church. You can’t arrest us from doing one of our sacraments, and I knew this. So that’s why . . . I said let’s do a church. We could have done temple. We could have done synagogue. We could have done mosque.” “So [the founding of Genesis] wasn’t really about religion?” the investigator asked. “It was in order to – to in a way, legalize the use of MMS?”“Right,” Grenon replied. “It wasn’t at all religious.” (On its website, Genesis II claims to be “non-religious but spiritual.”)Although the criminal complaint indicates Genesis II and the Grenons were under investigation by at least October 2019 (when they allegedly gave an undercover FDA investigator terrible cancer treatment advice), federal scrutiny on the church intensified when it started promoting MMS as a coronavirus cure. The FDA sent Genesis II an injunction, telling them to please stop doing that. But the church allegedly continued, advertising “testimonials” that promoted potentially virus-spreading activity. One reviewer, featured in a Genesis II newsletter, claimed to have “traveled to the Philippines and had to pass through Seoul, Korea and Tokyo, Japan airports where just about everyone was wearing the masks for coronavirus. We had no fear (and no masks) because we had MMS protection. We are back home and everyone is still healthy.”The Grenons also allegedly made violent threats against the judge who signed the injunction. In an April podcast, Mark Grenon and his son Joseph stated that they would not obey the restraining order.“You’ve got the 2nd [Amendment]. Right? When Congress does immoral things, passes immoral laws, that’s when you pick up guns, right?,” one said. “You want a Waco? Do they want a Waco?” In a later podcast, Grenon accused the judge of “treason,” and in a third podcast warned that the judge “could be taken out.”Grenon and his three sons were charged with “conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.” Their Bradenton, Florida headquarters were raided on Wednesday, and Jordan and Johnathan arrested. It was not immediately clear whether either had lawyers.Mark Grenon, meanwhile, was at large as of Thursday morning. Genesis II has associates worldwide, particularly in Africa and South America. (Genesis II and other bleach sellers have faced particular scrutiny for giving bleach to African children.) None of the seven Genesis II chapters in the U.S., Canada, or Colombia that listed their phone numbers online answered the phone or returned The Daily Beast’s calls.In an “emergency” interview with the founder of a conspiracy theory-laden “health news” site after the raid, Grenon revealed that he was in Colombia, where he expected to be arrested and extradited.Questioned by an interviewer who called the FDA a “terrorist organization,” Grenon stuck to his old argument that Genesis II was a legitimate religious organization.“The FDA says we should stop giving our sacraments to the world. We just basically said no, we have the First Amendment,” he said. “It says we have free exercise of our religious beliefs.”Asked about his bleach’s medical validity, Grenon described MMS as “so real. I had projectile vomiting from bad sushi. I took it and within a couple of minutes, gone.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over police

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Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leadersThe Confederacy "was an act of treason at the time against the Union, against the Stars and Stripes, against the US Constitution," Gen. Mark Milley said.


El Salvador murder rate plummets; study says gangs may have informal pact with government
University of California names first Black president

University of California names first Black presidentMichael Drake will be the first black president in the university system's 152-year history.


Virginia eliminates huge backlog of untested rape kits
GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ Proposal

GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ ProposalRepublican senators are piecing together an additional coronavirus aid package to counter House Democrats' phase-4 aid proposal.The GOP bill in its current form will provide an additional $1.3 trillion in economic aid to U.S. taxpayers and businesses, CNN reported on Wednesday evening. House Democrats have already proposed their own $3 trillion aid package, however Senate Republicans have pushed back on the high price tag."It won’t be $3 trillion. That bill is not going anywhere," Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said on Wednesday. The GOP proposal will likely include aid to schools, hospitals, and businesses, along with liability protections for companies.The Republican caucus has urged caution when passing additional aid packages, preferring to study the effects of previous legislation to make sure the aid is effective in keeping the U.S. economy afloat. McConnell said that talks with Democrats on a new round of aid would be more difficult "because of the proximity to the election.""It is unclear to me right now how we will resolve several contentious issues," Senator Chris Coons (D., Conn.) told CNN, echoing McConnell. "It's going to be a rough road. There are a lot of competing interests. A lot."House Democrats may also piece together an infrastructure spending bill to offset some of the economic effects of the pandemic. The idea for an infrastructure bill has received support from Republicans including President Trump, as well as Senators Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), Roy Blunt (R., Mo.), and Roger Wicker (R., Miss.).


NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quit

NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quitThe New York Police Department (NYPD) has reportedly limited the number of retirement applications it will allow, after it saw a surge in requests in the last couple of months.The NYPD announced on Wednesday that 179 officers filed for retirement between 29 June and 6 July – a 411 per cent increase on the 35 who retired in the same time period in 2019.


These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.

These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.An Arizona teacher is dead after contracting COVID-19. Two others tested positive after teaching in the same classroom. They hope schools stay closed.


Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker

Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker'The biggest determining factor of whether you live around toxicity is the color of your skin'


DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissal

DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissalThe U.S. District Court judge who oversaw the criminal case of President Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn has requested a full appeals court review after a three-judge panel ordered him to dismiss it. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan made the highly unusual the request Thursday. A three-judge panel last month ordered Sullivan to dismiss the case against Flynn, following the Justice Department's extraordinary decision to drop the prosecution.


Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump

Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump	New York Times opinion writer Tom Friedman says Biden should refuse to debate Trump unless he releases his tax returns; Jacqui Heinrich reports.


Bosnian Serb government indoctrinating children over Srebrenica, U.N. tribunal head says
The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on Amazon

The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on AmazonA minor nuisance that comes with U.S. sanctions is having to say goodbye to buying on Amazon.


Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for life

Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for lifeAn opposition governor was detained and several activists had their homes raided by the police on Thursday as Russia’s latest crackdown on dissent gathers momentum. The flurry of arrests and criminal inquiries follow last week’s vote in which nearly 78 percent endorsed constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay as president at least until 2036 when he turns 83. Sergei Furgal, the governor of the Khabarovsk region in Russia’s Far East who beat a Kremlin candidate at the 2018 election, was arrested by camouflaged agents of Russia’s top investigative body on Thursday morning and put on a plane to Moscow. The popular governor whose landslide win at the polls embarrassed the pro-Kremlin party, is accused of organising two contract killings as well as an attempted murder 15 years ago, according to the Investigative Committee, Russia's main federal investigating authority. Mr Furgal has not been charged with any crime. An unnamed source claiming to be linked to Mr Furgal says he has denied the allegations. Mr Furgal had been in Russian parliament for more than a decade before he won the Khabarovsk election in 2018, which has raised questions about the timing of the charges brought against him.


Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education system

Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education systemThe US needs an education system that informs students about the world around them, retired Navy Adm. William McRaven said.


'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returns

'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returnsThe pandemic is creating the social conditions – no jobs, isolation, despair – that helped enable the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place. Now it’s backIn West Virginia, they are bracing for the second wave.The epidemic that hit the Appalachian state harder than any other in the US finally looked to be in retreat. Now it’s advancing again. Not coronavirus but opioid overdoses, with one scourge driving a resurgence of the other.Covid-19 has claimed 93 lives in West Virginia over the past three months. That is only a fraction of those killed by drug overdoses, which caused nearly 1,000 deaths in the state in 2018 alone, mostly from opioids but also methamphetamine (also known as meth).That year was better than the one before as the Appalachian state appeared to turn the tide on an epidemic that has ravaged the region for two decades, destroying lives, tearing apart families and dragging down local economies.Now coronavirus looks to be undoing the advances made against a drug epidemic that has claimed close to 600,000 lives in the US over the past two decades. Worse, it is also laying the ground for a long-term resurgence of addiction by exacerbating many of the conditions, including unemployment, low incomes and isolation, that contributed to the rise of the opioid epidemic and “deaths of despair”.“The number of opioid overdoses is skyrocketing and I don’t think it will be easily turned back,” said Dr Mike Brumage, former director of the West Virginia office of drug control policy.“Once the tsunami of Covid-19 finally recedes, we’re going to be left with the social conditions that enabled the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place, and those are not going to go away.”To Brumage and others, coronavirus has also shown what can happen when the government takes a public health emergency seriously, unlike the opioid epidemic, which was largely ignored even as the death toll climbed into the hundreds of thousands.The American Medical Association said it was “greatly concerned” at reported increases in opioid overdoses in more than 30 states although it will be months before hard data is available.> Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection> > Dr Mike BrumagePublic health officials from Kentucky to Florida, Texas and Colorado have recorded surges in opioid deaths as the economic and social anxieties created by the Covid-19 pandemic prove fertile ground for addiction. In addition, Brumage said significant numbers of people have fallen out of treatment programmes as support networks have been yanked away by social distancing orders.“I’m a firm adherent to the idea that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, the opposite of addiction is connection. Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection,” he said.“Many of the people who were using the programme either didn’t have broadband or they didn’t have cellphone service, especially those who were homeless. They just fell out of the programme,” he said.The resurgence was not unforeseen. In March, as Covid-19 escalated, Donald Trump warned about the human toll beyond lives claimed by the virus. “You’re going to have tremendous suicides, but you know what you’re going to have more than anything else? Drug addiction. You will see drugs being used like nobody has ever used them before. And people are going to be dying all over the place from drug addiction,” he said.Brumage and others who spoke to the Guardian were at pains to say they believed the scale of the government’s response to Covid-19 is necessary. But they saw the mobilisation of financial resources and political will to cope with the virus in stark contrast to the response of successive administrations to the opioid epidemic.Emily Walden lost her son to an opioid overdose and now heads Fed Up!, a group campaigning to reduce the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing levels.“Congress immediately acted with coronavirus to help those that lost their jobs, to make sure that people were taken care of and it was addressed properly,” she said. “Look at the difference with the opioid epidemic, which has largely been ignored by our federal government for 20 years.”While the US government has thrown $6tn at coronavirus, the Trump administration dedicated just $6bn to directly dealing with opioid addiction over his first two years in office even though about the same number of people died of drug overdoses in that period as have now been lost to Covid-19.Brumage said federal health institutions have shifted their focus to coronavirus, including freezing a $1bn research project to find less addictive pain treatments.> You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous> > Dr Mike Brumage“It’s robbed the oxygen out of the room and made it the sole focus of what’s happening,” said Brumage. “There’s also a fatigue about the opioid crisis. You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous, but it’s not happening at the same speed and scale as the coronavirus is having right now.” Brumage attributes the difference in response in part to attitudes toward drug addiction.“The difference between getting Covid and dying of an overdose is stigma around drug use. This has been ingrained across the United States – that people using drugs are somehow seen as morally deficient and so it becomes easier then to other and alienate those people,” he said.Walden does not accept that explanation. Like many whose families have been devastated by opioids, she sees a personal and public health catastrophe perpetuated by the financial and political power of the pharmaceutical industry to drive the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing rates which were a major factor in driving the epidemic.“This comes down to lobbyists and money. People say it’s stigma and it’s not. There is stigma but it’s about profits and greed,” she said.Dr Raeford Brown, a former chair of the Food and Drug Administration’s opioid advisory committee, is a longstanding critic of drug industry influence over opioid medical policy and the government’s response to the epidemic. He sees a parallel with coronavirus with US states lifting strong social distancing orders too early under corporate pressure.“The United States is not good at doing public health,” he said. “It failed the test with opioids and it failed the test with viral pandemics. But coronavirus and pandemics, and the things like the opioid crisis, are much more likely to get us than the Russians or the Chinese are.”


Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow Republican

Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow RepublicanPro-Trump internet personality Omar Navarro emerged from a six-month stint in jail on a stalking charge last month, and immediately registered to run for Congress. Navarro, a perennial challenger to Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), has registered to run for her seat again in 2022—assuming, perhaps logically, that Waters will once again prevail in her re-election request this November. But Navarro, who had nearly $50,000 in his campaign bank account as of March 31 even while he served his jail term, is not going to wait for those results before getting involved. He told The Daily Beast that he’s going to send out mailers this election cycle denouncing Joe Collins, the Republican nominee currently running against Waters.“Hey, I don’t agree with him,” Navarro told The Daily Beast. “I believe Maxine Waters is better than him.”Asked for comment on Navarro’s sour-grapes scheme to ruin Collins’s already slim chances of winning this fall, Collins responded  by accusing Navarro of having “daddy issues” without elaborating. "Omar Navarro is a joke,” Collins told The Daily Beast. “He has the mentality of a four year old child throwing a temper tantrum and the testicular fortitude of a mouse.” A Perennial Congressional Candidate Beloved by Trump World Was Just Arrested on Stalking ChargesThe scrapping between Collins and Navarro for the chance to lose to Waters highlights the odd incentives facing Republican challengers taking on famous incumbents in heavily Democratic districts. Running against Waters as a Republican would be a poor choice for anyone who actually wants to win. Indeed, Navarro has tried twice already, losing by more than 50 percentage points in 2016 and 2018. But for a GOPer interested in raising millions off of Waters’s notoriety as a devoted Trump foe, and increasing his profile in the pro-Trump mediasphere, it works out great. Navarro raked in donations from low-dollar contributors and saw his stature on the online Trump right explode thanks to his quixotic earlier campaigns. Even the candidates themselves acknowledge the money that’s at stake for whoever wins the right to face off against Waters. “The main reason Navarro is upset is because he's used to living off of his campaign donations and now he's facing the realization that, after being beaten by a real candidate with a shot at winning, he has to find a real job,” Collins said in his email. For Navarro, that time in the bright lights of online Trumpy fame came to a halt when he was arrested in December in San Francisco after stalking ex-girlfriend and fellow Republican personality DeAnna Lorraine Tesoriero, who herself was running a doomed campaign against Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Navarro eventually pleaded guilty to a stalking charge, and was sentenced to six months in San Francisco’s jail, where he claims to have lost 30 pounds. Even while imprisoned in San Francisco, Navarro kept up his political profile. And he stayed on the ballot, losing the March Republican primary to Collins by a mere 250 votes—a 0.3 percent difference in the vote total. Undeterred by that loss, Navarro has tried to recast himself since being released from jail as the latest victim of deep-state prosecutors. While other Trump supporters who faced criminal charges were involved in international intrigue, however, Navarro has been faced with claiming that he was arrested on a local stalking charge because of some secret government scheme. “Full disclosure with you guys: in the past six months, yes, I have been in a county jail,” Navarro told his more than 250,000 Twitter followers after being released from jail. Despite overwhelming evidence that Navarro violated Tesoriero’s restraining order against him, including the fact that Navarro bashed Tesoriero to The Daily Beast in apparent violation of the order, Navarro claims that he only pleaded guilty because he would have become a “political prisoner” if he hadn’t.“I wouldn’t have been judged by a jury of my peers, I would’ve been judged by a bunch of liberals, and they would have kept me locked up in there as a political prisoner,” Navarro said in his Twitter video. “And that’s not OK.” While it might seem strange for the recently imprisoned Navarro to be confident he can win the 2022 primary to challenge Waters, he is aided by the fact that Collins has a bizarre history of his own.A Navy veteran, Collins has continuously switched parties since 2016, cycling between being a Democrat, a Republican, a member of the Green Party, and a member of the “Millennial Political Party.” Collins has also filed a lawsuit over child support payments that is riddled with language echoing the nonsense legal language used by members of the far-right sovereign citizen movement. At one point in his lawsuit, in an apparent attempt to deploy a fringe legal theory, Collins claimed that his bodily fluids were worth $15 million—a bizarre detail Navarro has seized on in his campaign to bring down his rival.   “You’re the guy that’s gonna take down Maxine Waters?” Navarro said in a video taunting Collins that he released in late June. “I’m sorry, but you’re not gonna do that. And by the way, your bodily fluids are not worth $15 million.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changed

I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changedThe hardest part of the challenge turned out to be mental instead of physical, senior lifestyle reporter Rachel Hosie found.


César Duarte: Fugitive Mexican ex-governor arrested in Miami

César Duarte: Fugitive Mexican ex-governor arrested in MiamiCésar Duarte fled Mexico in 2018 after being accused of embezzling millions to fund a lavish lifestyle.


Philadelphia waives 100s of protest-related code violations
India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign students

India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign studentsIndia has conveyed its concerns to the United States about a new immigration order that could force a large number of Indian students to return home, the foreign ministry said on Thursday. U.S. President Donald Trump's administration issued a new rule this week that would bar foreign students from remaining in the United States if their universities are not holding in-person classes during the upcoming fall semester because of coronavirus. "We have urged the U.S. side that we need to keep in mind the role that educational exchanges and people to people relations have played in the development of our relations," Anurag Srivastava, spokesman at India's foreign ministry told a news conference.


Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops say

Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops sayPolice said one of the suspects tried to flee the scene.


In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rights

In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rightsThe United States on Thursday took its first major action to stop "horrific" abuses against China's Uighurs and other Turkic Muslims, slapping sanctions on several senior officials. Three officials will be refused US visas and see any US-based assets frozen including Chen Quanguo, the Chinese Communist Party chief for the Xinjiang region and architect of Beijing's hardline policies against restive minorities. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the United States was acting against "horrific and systematic abuses" in the western region including forced labor, mass detention and involuntary population control.


As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in Jacksonville

As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in JacksonvilleWith coronavirus cases exploding in Florida, the president now says he is “flexible” on plans to hold a large-scale, indoor Republican National Convention next month.


An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violation

An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violationThe Austin Police Department defended the officer's conduct, saying he followed the department's regulations and that no female officer was available.


Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'

Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'Mexico on Wednesday posted a fresh record for new coronavirus cases reported on a single day, with 6,995 infections, overtaking Spain to register the world's eighth highest case count, according to a Reuters tally. Despite the soaring figures, Mexico's coronavirus czar, Hugo Lopez-Gatell, said the pandemic was "slowing." The figures pushed Mexico's overall tally of infections to 275,003 cases.


Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China fury

Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China furyAustralia offered pathways to permanent residency for thousands of people from Hong Kong on Thursday in response to China's crackdown on dissent, drawing a furious reply from Beijing. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said his government was suspending its extradition agreement with the city and, in addition to extending the visas of 10,000 Hong Kongers already in the country, threw open the door to thousands more wanting to start a new life Down Under. Morrison said the decisions were taken in response to China's imposition last week of a tough new security law in Hong Kong, which he said "constitutes a fundamental change of circumstances" for the semi-autonomous territory.


Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school says

Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school saysThe new cases could impact the fall semester.


Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million people

Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million peopleJack Dorsey's fellow Silicon Valley billionaires Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg think a universal basic income could help poor Americans, too.


Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of it

Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of itA man who flies a Nazi flag on the back of his car to show his opposition to Black Lives Matter protests and gay people, claims he was attacked last month because of it.Jesus Seineke, who lives in Alpine, San Diego, flies a Nazi flag on the back of his SUV when he drives around his local area.


Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'

Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'"It has been several weeks since Israel's compass for handling the pandemic has lost its bearings," wrote the public health director in her resignation.


Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in Kashmir

Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in KashmirA Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party politician was killed along with his brother and father in Indian administered Kashmir, officials said on Thursday. Wasim Bari, 38, and his family were attacked by militants at his residence in north Kashmir's Bandipora district on Wednesday night. All three were shot at point-blank range and died on the way to hospital. Authorities have arrested all 11 police personnel who were guarding him for dereliction of duties. Mr Bari's residence is a few meters away from the police station. This is the first attack on BJP workers in Kashmir after abrogation of Article 370 on August 5, 2019, when India stripped off the disputed region's autonomy. The killing of Mr Bari, who is survived by his wife and sister, has sent shock waves across political circles in Kashmir. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has condemned the attack.


Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unity

Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unityPolitical task forces Joe Biden formed with onetime rival Bernie Sanders to solidify support among the Democratic Party's progressive wing recommended Wednesday that the former vice president embrace major proposals to combat climate change and institutional racism while expanding health care coverage and rebuilding a coronavirus-ravaged economy. The groups, formed in May to tackle health care, immigration, education, criminal justice reform, climate change and the economy, sought to hammer out a policy road map to best defeat President Donald Trump.


Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research Groups

Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research GroupsFederal prosecutors allege that a top immunologist at Ohio State University illegally concealed Chinese funding for his research and attempted to flee the country before his arrest in Alaska in May.In a criminal complaint unsealed on Thursday, the Justice Department accuses Song Guo Zheng, the Ronald L. Whisler MD Chair in Rheumatology and Immunology at Ohio State’s medical school, of fraudulently obtaining federal grant funds from the National Institutes of Health and making false statements to investigators.Zheng, prosecutors say, obtained nearly $5 million in federal research grants without disclosing ties to Chinese entities and additional grant funds provided by them. The complaint and other filings in a federal court in Ohio indicate that Zheng has long been affiliated with Chinese research efforts called “Talent Plans” that U.S. officials have alleged are integral to Chinese government efforts to boost scientific and technological advancement in the country by having experts train and conduct research in the United States and elsewhere.According to prosecutors, Ohio State placed Zheng on administrative leave while it conducted its own investigation into those alleged omissions. Zheng, they say, quickly began making plans to return to his native China.Zheng’s attorneys have not directly responded to the allegations in court. But the transcript of his arraignment indicates that Zheng, a U.S. permanent resident, has denied the charges against him. “I understand” the charges, Zheng told the court through a translator, “but I disagree with all of them.”Ohio State confirmed that Zheng was an employee and said he’d been placed on unpaid leave, but declined to comment further. “Ohio State has been and continues to assist federal law enforcement authorities in every way possible,” a university spokesperson told The Daily Beast in an email. “We cannot comment further at this time due to the ongoing law enforcement investigation.”The U.S. Attorney’s office in the Southern District of Ohio declined to comment when The Daily Beast first inquired about the Alaska arrest in late May. However, they provided a statement on Thursday after the criminal complaint was unsealed.“We allege that Zheng was preparing to flee the country after he learned that his employer had begun an administrative process into whether or not he was complying with rules governing taxpayer-funded grants,” said David M. DeVillers, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. “This is our office’s third recent case involving the illegal transfer of intellectual property and research to China. This underscores our commitment to work with the FBI, the Department of Health and Human Services, and our research institutions to protect our country’s position as a global leader in research and innovation, and to punish those who try to exploit and undermine that position.”  A lawyer for Zheng did not respond to repeated requests for information. Efforts to reach Zheng personally were not successful.Zheng’s case is just the latest federal prosecution of a U.S. academic whom the DOJ alleges had undisclosed ties to Chinese interests or funders. The department has also recently gone after researchers at Harvard University and the University of Kansas. In public remarks this week, the FBI Director Chris Wray stated, “We’ve now reached the point where the FBI is opening a new China-related counterintelligence case about every 10 hours.”Prosecutors say Zheng’s case revolves around a failure to disclose Chinese funding in grant applications during his time at OSU and at two previous jobs at the University of Southern California and Pennsylvania State University.Zheng “had received numerous admonishments from both NIH and OSU regarding conflicts of interest, and I believe he failed to disclose his overseas activities because he knew they placed his NIH funding at risk,” an FBI agent investigating the case told the court. According to prosecutors, Zheng gave conflicting answers when asked if he was involved with China’s Talent Plan programs. Zheng told a law enforcement interviewed that he “had been recruited into the PRC talent plans but he did not accept the position because he did not want to spend nine months of the year in the PRC.” But later in the interview, he appeared to acknowledge his participation, saying “he did not know he had to report his affiliation with talent plans.”According to the criminal complaint, OSU notified Zheng of its administrative investigation in mid-May. Six days later, prosecutors say, he left Columbus, “contacted a friend and was afforded a seat on a charter flight back to the PRC and packed up numerous electronic devices and a significant amount of personal items.” Prosecutors also presented evidence that Zheng and his wife planned to sell their house in Ohio.Prosecutors characterized that as an attempt by Zheng to flee the country. He was stopped at the Ted Stevens airport in Alaska. Zheng allegedly used his Chinese passport to board the flight and when the plane was deboarded, he quickly gave his carry-on luggage to a passenger he did not know. “When confronted,” prosecutors said, “Zheng initially indicated he was moving permanently, then changed his story to indicate he was visiting a sick relative and later added he was looking for a job in the PRC.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college

Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college	Raw video: Pam Shriver says her late husband met Trump after he was already enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania.


Explosion heard in western Tehran: Iran state media
Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in Florida

Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in FloridaVice President Mike Pence on Wednesday said the White House coronavirus task force sees signs COVID-19 prevention measures are working in Florida.


The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet

The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet"I'm obviously deeply concerned about...the ability of our healthcare system to respond to this increase in cases," Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said.


Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'

Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'An Ohio sheriff said he won't enforce Governor Mike DeWine's order making face masks mandatory in states with high rates of Covid-19 infections.Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones appeared on CNN Wednesday and told anchor Brianna Keilar that while he wears a mask and is "good with that," he has no plans on enforcing the governor's mask order.


'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job

'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job"He absolutely does not represent our values and no longer works at our agency," the CEO of Ted Todd Insurance said Tuesday.


15 Platform Beds to Elevate Your Bedroom Style
Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden

Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden"Whoah," the host said after a Trump spokesman claimed Biden "coaxed children up onto his porch during quarantine" and "children love his leg hair."


Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man

Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man
      Two men, one from Philadelphia and another from Delaware County, were killed during a lightning storm in northern Pennsylvania.


The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’

The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’The leader of Florida’s biggest sham “church” network peddling bleach as a miracle drug says he’s camped out in Colombia while his sons face arrest for allegedly selling a fake COVID-19 cure and threatening a judge with a “Waco”-style standoff.For years, the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing has been at the center of a lucrative, world-wide network that claims—falsely—that drinking glorified Clorox can cure you of virtually any illness. The “church” (which is not religious, by its own admission) has raked in the cash promoting “Miracle Mineral Solution,” a bleach solution first popularized in 2006 by an ex-Scientologist who claimed to be an alien god. Ludicrous as the scheme sounds, it’s seen a recent surge in visibility, gaining endorsements from conspiracy theorists and well-known conservatives. Now, four members of the family behind Genesis II are facing criminal charges for allegedly flouting an order to stop marketing MMS as a COVID-19 cure. Two have been arrested, while the family patriarch says he’s out of the country.Genesis II isn’t a real church. You can’t worship at a physical location, and its leader, “Archbishop” Mark Grenon, is not actually ordained. Instead, it’s a network of people peddling sodium chlorite, a bleach compound that the Food and Drug Administration warned in 2019 “can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration.” Nevertheless, Genesis II has thrived in recent years. The church’s founder, Jim Humble, is a former Scientologist who claims to be a billion-year-old space god from another galaxy. Humble worked with Genesis II for years, before appearing to back away from the church after an ABC News investigation. QAnon-ers’ Magic Cure for Coronavirus: Just Drink Bleach!"There are certainly times I have said some things that I probably should have said differently,” he wrote in a 2016 blog post. “For lack of a better way to express things at the time— or because others put words in my mouth, in the past I have stated that MMS cures most of all diseases. Today, I say that MMS cures nothing!"The revelation didn’t stop Mark Grenon and his sons Joseph, Jordan, and Jonathan from peddling bleach. The family and their “church” raked it in for years, media investigations and criminal charges show. In one investigation, an undercover news crew attended one of Grenon’s $450 MMS seminars in a California hotel. There, Grenon hinted at the church’s lack of real religious convictions.“Everybody start a church and do it from there. You can sell them anything! Tell them Jesus heals you while you drink this,” Grenon said.Federal investigators apparently pursued those claims as the basis of a fraud charge. In a February 2020 interview, cited in the criminal complaint, Grenon told investigators he’d started a church in order to sell MMS.“Everything you do commercially is under the Universal Commercial code, okay?” Grenon said, according to the complaint. “A church is completely separate from that code, statutes, and laws. That’s why a priest can give a kid wine in church publicly and not get arrested. Because it’s a sacrament.[…] I knew this because . . . they tried to arrest us for proclaiming stuff on the street in Boston. They threw it out of court because we’re a church. You can’t arrest us from doing one of our sacraments, and I knew this. So that’s why . . . I said let’s do a church. We could have done temple. We could have done synagogue. We could have done mosque.” “So [the founding of Genesis] wasn’t really about religion?” the investigator asked. “It was in order to – to in a way, legalize the use of MMS?”“Right,” Grenon replied. “It wasn’t at all religious.” (On its website, Genesis II claims to be “non-religious but spiritual.”)Although the criminal complaint indicates Genesis II and the Grenons were under investigation by at least October 2019 (when they allegedly gave an undercover FDA investigator terrible cancer treatment advice), federal scrutiny on the church intensified when it started promoting MMS as a coronavirus cure. The FDA sent Genesis II an injunction, telling them to please stop doing that. But the church allegedly continued, advertising “testimonials” that promoted potentially virus-spreading activity. One reviewer, featured in a Genesis II newsletter, claimed to have “traveled to the Philippines and had to pass through Seoul, Korea and Tokyo, Japan airports where just about everyone was wearing the masks for coronavirus. We had no fear (and no masks) because we had MMS protection. We are back home and everyone is still healthy.”The Grenons also allegedly made violent threats against the judge who signed the injunction. In an April podcast, Mark Grenon and his son Joseph stated that they would not obey the restraining order.“You’ve got the 2nd [Amendment]. Right? When Congress does immoral things, passes immoral laws, that’s when you pick up guns, right?,” one said. “You want a Waco? Do they want a Waco?” In a later podcast, Grenon accused the judge of “treason,” and in a third podcast warned that the judge “could be taken out.”Grenon and his three sons were charged with “conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.” Their Bradenton, Florida headquarters were raided on Wednesday, and Jordan and Johnathan arrested. It was not immediately clear whether either had lawyers.Mark Grenon, meanwhile, was at large as of Thursday morning. Genesis II has associates worldwide, particularly in Africa and South America. (Genesis II and other bleach sellers have faced particular scrutiny for giving bleach to African children.) None of the seven Genesis II chapters in the U.S., Canada, or Colombia that listed their phone numbers online answered the phone or returned The Daily Beast’s calls.In an “emergency” interview with the founder of a conspiracy theory-laden “health news” site after the raid, Grenon revealed that he was in Colombia, where he expected to be arrested and extradited.Questioned by an interviewer who called the FDA a “terrorist organization,” Grenon stuck to his old argument that Genesis II was a legitimate religious organization.“The FDA says we should stop giving our sacraments to the world. We just basically said no, we have the First Amendment,” he said. “It says we have free exercise of our religious beliefs.”Asked about his bleach’s medical validity, Grenon described MMS as “so real. I had projectile vomiting from bad sushi. I took it and within a couple of minutes, gone.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over police

New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over policeNew York Attorney General Letitia James recommended that New York City's mayor give up sole control over the city police commissioner's hiring, in a preliminary report released on Wednesday on her investigation into the policing of recent protests. "There should be an entirely new accountability structure for NYPD," James said in her report, which also recommended giving more power to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, a city agency that reviews police misconduct.


Wisconsin police officer rescues dog from burning house
US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buy

US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buyJapan is set to become the fourth operator of the F-35B short takeoff and landing variant.


Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-ahead

Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-aheadTexas has executed its first death row inmate since it first confirmed a case of coronavirus after a Supreme Court ruling allowed his execution to go ahead.Billy Joe Wardlow, 45, was sentenced to death in 1993 for a robbery and murder in which he and his girlfriend tried to rob 82-year-old Carl Cole of his truck using a .45-calibre gun. Mr Wardlow fired the gun in a struggle, and Cole was killed; the couple were arrested two days later.


If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollars

If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollarsSix states had half the international student enrollment.


Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentence

Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentenceA former Indian naval officer on death row in Pakistan for alleged spying has refused to lodge an appeal against his conviction and will try instead for a military pardon, an official said Wednesday. Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav was arrested in 2016 in Pakistan's restive southwestern province of Balochistan -- a region where Islamabad has long accused New Delhi of backing separatist rebels.


Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say

Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say“Some people are very passionate about their opinions.”


Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leaders

Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leadersThe Confederacy "was an act of treason at the time against the Union, against the Stars and Stripes, against the US Constitution," Gen. Mark Milley said.


El Salvador murder rate plummets; study says gangs may have informal pact with government
University of California names first Black president

University of California names first Black presidentMichael Drake will be the first black president in the university system's 152-year history.


Virginia eliminates huge backlog of untested rape kits
GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ Proposal

GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ ProposalRepublican senators are piecing together an additional coronavirus aid package to counter House Democrats' phase-4 aid proposal.The GOP bill in its current form will provide an additional $1.3 trillion in economic aid to U.S. taxpayers and businesses, CNN reported on Wednesday evening. House Democrats have already proposed their own $3 trillion aid package, however Senate Republicans have pushed back on the high price tag."It won’t be $3 trillion. That bill is not going anywhere," Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said on Wednesday. The GOP proposal will likely include aid to schools, hospitals, and businesses, along with liability protections for companies.The Republican caucus has urged caution when passing additional aid packages, preferring to study the effects of previous legislation to make sure the aid is effective in keeping the U.S. economy afloat. McConnell said that talks with Democrats on a new round of aid would be more difficult "because of the proximity to the election.""It is unclear to me right now how we will resolve several contentious issues," Senator Chris Coons (D., Conn.) told CNN, echoing McConnell. "It's going to be a rough road. There are a lot of competing interests. A lot."House Democrats may also piece together an infrastructure spending bill to offset some of the economic effects of the pandemic. The idea for an infrastructure bill has received support from Republicans including President Trump, as well as Senators Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), Roy Blunt (R., Mo.), and Roger Wicker (R., Miss.).


NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quit

NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quitThe New York Police Department (NYPD) has reportedly limited the number of retirement applications it will allow, after it saw a surge in requests in the last couple of months.The NYPD announced on Wednesday that 179 officers filed for retirement between 29 June and 6 July – a 411 per cent increase on the 35 who retired in the same time period in 2019.


These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.

These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.An Arizona teacher is dead after contracting COVID-19. Two others tested positive after teaching in the same classroom. They hope schools stay closed.


Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker

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DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissal

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Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump

Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump	New York Times opinion writer Tom Friedman says Biden should refuse to debate Trump unless he releases his tax returns; Jacqui Heinrich reports.


Bosnian Serb government indoctrinating children over Srebrenica, U.N. tribunal head says
The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on Amazon

The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on AmazonA minor nuisance that comes with U.S. sanctions is having to say goodbye to buying on Amazon.


Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for life

Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for lifeAn opposition governor was detained and several activists had their homes raided by the police on Thursday as Russia’s latest crackdown on dissent gathers momentum. The flurry of arrests and criminal inquiries follow last week’s vote in which nearly 78 percent endorsed constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay as president at least until 2036 when he turns 83. Sergei Furgal, the governor of the Khabarovsk region in Russia’s Far East who beat a Kremlin candidate at the 2018 election, was arrested by camouflaged agents of Russia’s top investigative body on Thursday morning and put on a plane to Moscow. The popular governor whose landslide win at the polls embarrassed the pro-Kremlin party, is accused of organising two contract killings as well as an attempted murder 15 years ago, according to the Investigative Committee, Russia's main federal investigating authority. Mr Furgal has not been charged with any crime. An unnamed source claiming to be linked to Mr Furgal says he has denied the allegations. Mr Furgal had been in Russian parliament for more than a decade before he won the Khabarovsk election in 2018, which has raised questions about the timing of the charges brought against him.


Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education system

Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education systemThe US needs an education system that informs students about the world around them, retired Navy Adm. William McRaven said.


'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returns

'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returnsThe pandemic is creating the social conditions – no jobs, isolation, despair – that helped enable the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place. Now it’s backIn West Virginia, they are bracing for the second wave.The epidemic that hit the Appalachian state harder than any other in the US finally looked to be in retreat. Now it’s advancing again. Not coronavirus but opioid overdoses, with one scourge driving a resurgence of the other.Covid-19 has claimed 93 lives in West Virginia over the past three months. That is only a fraction of those killed by drug overdoses, which caused nearly 1,000 deaths in the state in 2018 alone, mostly from opioids but also methamphetamine (also known as meth).That year was better than the one before as the Appalachian state appeared to turn the tide on an epidemic that has ravaged the region for two decades, destroying lives, tearing apart families and dragging down local economies.Now coronavirus looks to be undoing the advances made against a drug epidemic that has claimed close to 600,000 lives in the US over the past two decades. Worse, it is also laying the ground for a long-term resurgence of addiction by exacerbating many of the conditions, including unemployment, low incomes and isolation, that contributed to the rise of the opioid epidemic and “deaths of despair”.“The number of opioid overdoses is skyrocketing and I don’t think it will be easily turned back,” said Dr Mike Brumage, former director of the West Virginia office of drug control policy.“Once the tsunami of Covid-19 finally recedes, we’re going to be left with the social conditions that enabled the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place, and those are not going to go away.”To Brumage and others, coronavirus has also shown what can happen when the government takes a public health emergency seriously, unlike the opioid epidemic, which was largely ignored even as the death toll climbed into the hundreds of thousands.The American Medical Association said it was “greatly concerned” at reported increases in opioid overdoses in more than 30 states although it will be months before hard data is available.> Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection> > Dr Mike BrumagePublic health officials from Kentucky to Florida, Texas and Colorado have recorded surges in opioid deaths as the economic and social anxieties created by the Covid-19 pandemic prove fertile ground for addiction. In addition, Brumage said significant numbers of people have fallen out of treatment programmes as support networks have been yanked away by social distancing orders.“I’m a firm adherent to the idea that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, the opposite of addiction is connection. Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection,” he said.“Many of the people who were using the programme either didn’t have broadband or they didn’t have cellphone service, especially those who were homeless. They just fell out of the programme,” he said.The resurgence was not unforeseen. In March, as Covid-19 escalated, Donald Trump warned about the human toll beyond lives claimed by the virus. “You’re going to have tremendous suicides, but you know what you’re going to have more than anything else? Drug addiction. You will see drugs being used like nobody has ever used them before. And people are going to be dying all over the place from drug addiction,” he said.Brumage and others who spoke to the Guardian were at pains to say they believed the scale of the government’s response to Covid-19 is necessary. But they saw the mobilisation of financial resources and political will to cope with the virus in stark contrast to the response of successive administrations to the opioid epidemic.Emily Walden lost her son to an opioid overdose and now heads Fed Up!, a group campaigning to reduce the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing levels.“Congress immediately acted with coronavirus to help those that lost their jobs, to make sure that people were taken care of and it was addressed properly,” she said. “Look at the difference with the opioid epidemic, which has largely been ignored by our federal government for 20 years.”While the US government has thrown $6tn at coronavirus, the Trump administration dedicated just $6bn to directly dealing with opioid addiction over his first two years in office even though about the same number of people died of drug overdoses in that period as have now been lost to Covid-19.Brumage said federal health institutions have shifted their focus to coronavirus, including freezing a $1bn research project to find less addictive pain treatments.> You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous> > Dr Mike Brumage“It’s robbed the oxygen out of the room and made it the sole focus of what’s happening,” said Brumage. “There’s also a fatigue about the opioid crisis. You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous, but it’s not happening at the same speed and scale as the coronavirus is having right now.” Brumage attributes the difference in response in part to attitudes toward drug addiction.“The difference between getting Covid and dying of an overdose is stigma around drug use. This has been ingrained across the United States – that people using drugs are somehow seen as morally deficient and so it becomes easier then to other and alienate those people,” he said.Walden does not accept that explanation. Like many whose families have been devastated by opioids, she sees a personal and public health catastrophe perpetuated by the financial and political power of the pharmaceutical industry to drive the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing rates which were a major factor in driving the epidemic.“This comes down to lobbyists and money. People say it’s stigma and it’s not. There is stigma but it’s about profits and greed,” she said.Dr Raeford Brown, a former chair of the Food and Drug Administration’s opioid advisory committee, is a longstanding critic of drug industry influence over opioid medical policy and the government’s response to the epidemic. He sees a parallel with coronavirus with US states lifting strong social distancing orders too early under corporate pressure.“The United States is not good at doing public health,” he said. “It failed the test with opioids and it failed the test with viral pandemics. But coronavirus and pandemics, and the things like the opioid crisis, are much more likely to get us than the Russians or the Chinese are.”


Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow Republican

Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow RepublicanPro-Trump internet personality Omar Navarro emerged from a six-month stint in jail on a stalking charge last month, and immediately registered to run for Congress. Navarro, a perennial challenger to Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), has registered to run for her seat again in 2022—assuming, perhaps logically, that Waters will once again prevail in her re-election request this November. But Navarro, who had nearly $50,000 in his campaign bank account as of March 31 even while he served his jail term, is not going to wait for those results before getting involved. He told The Daily Beast that he’s going to send out mailers this election cycle denouncing Joe Collins, the Republican nominee currently running against Waters.“Hey, I don’t agree with him,” Navarro told The Daily Beast. “I believe Maxine Waters is better than him.”Asked for comment on Navarro’s sour-grapes scheme to ruin Collins’s already slim chances of winning this fall, Collins responded  by accusing Navarro of having “daddy issues” without elaborating. "Omar Navarro is a joke,” Collins told The Daily Beast. “He has the mentality of a four year old child throwing a temper tantrum and the testicular fortitude of a mouse.” A Perennial Congressional Candidate Beloved by Trump World Was Just Arrested on Stalking ChargesThe scrapping between Collins and Navarro for the chance to lose to Waters highlights the odd incentives facing Republican challengers taking on famous incumbents in heavily Democratic districts. Running against Waters as a Republican would be a poor choice for anyone who actually wants to win. Indeed, Navarro has tried twice already, losing by more than 50 percentage points in 2016 and 2018. But for a GOPer interested in raising millions off of Waters’s notoriety as a devoted Trump foe, and increasing his profile in the pro-Trump mediasphere, it works out great. Navarro raked in donations from low-dollar contributors and saw his stature on the online Trump right explode thanks to his quixotic earlier campaigns. Even the candidates themselves acknowledge the money that’s at stake for whoever wins the right to face off against Waters. “The main reason Navarro is upset is because he's used to living off of his campaign donations and now he's facing the realization that, after being beaten by a real candidate with a shot at winning, he has to find a real job,” Collins said in his email. For Navarro, that time in the bright lights of online Trumpy fame came to a halt when he was arrested in December in San Francisco after stalking ex-girlfriend and fellow Republican personality DeAnna Lorraine Tesoriero, who herself was running a doomed campaign against Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Navarro eventually pleaded guilty to a stalking charge, and was sentenced to six months in San Francisco’s jail, where he claims to have lost 30 pounds. Even while imprisoned in San Francisco, Navarro kept up his political profile. And he stayed on the ballot, losing the March Republican primary to Collins by a mere 250 votes—a 0.3 percent difference in the vote total. Undeterred by that loss, Navarro has tried to recast himself since being released from jail as the latest victim of deep-state prosecutors. While other Trump supporters who faced criminal charges were involved in international intrigue, however, Navarro has been faced with claiming that he was arrested on a local stalking charge because of some secret government scheme. “Full disclosure with you guys: in the past six months, yes, I have been in a county jail,” Navarro told his more than 250,000 Twitter followers after being released from jail. Despite overwhelming evidence that Navarro violated Tesoriero’s restraining order against him, including the fact that Navarro bashed Tesoriero to The Daily Beast in apparent violation of the order, Navarro claims that he only pleaded guilty because he would have become a “political prisoner” if he hadn’t.“I wouldn’t have been judged by a jury of my peers, I would’ve been judged by a bunch of liberals, and they would have kept me locked up in there as a political prisoner,” Navarro said in his Twitter video. “And that’s not OK.” While it might seem strange for the recently imprisoned Navarro to be confident he can win the 2022 primary to challenge Waters, he is aided by the fact that Collins has a bizarre history of his own.A Navy veteran, Collins has continuously switched parties since 2016, cycling between being a Democrat, a Republican, a member of the Green Party, and a member of the “Millennial Political Party.” Collins has also filed a lawsuit over child support payments that is riddled with language echoing the nonsense legal language used by members of the far-right sovereign citizen movement. At one point in his lawsuit, in an apparent attempt to deploy a fringe legal theory, Collins claimed that his bodily fluids were worth $15 million—a bizarre detail Navarro has seized on in his campaign to bring down his rival.   “You’re the guy that’s gonna take down Maxine Waters?” Navarro said in a video taunting Collins that he released in late June. “I’m sorry, but you’re not gonna do that. And by the way, your bodily fluids are not worth $15 million.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changed

I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changedThe hardest part of the challenge turned out to be mental instead of physical, senior lifestyle reporter Rachel Hosie found.


César Duarte: Fugitive Mexican ex-governor arrested in Miami

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Philadelphia waives 100s of protest-related code violations
India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign students

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Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops say

Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops sayPolice said one of the suspects tried to flee the scene.


In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rights

In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rightsThe United States on Thursday took its first major action to stop "horrific" abuses against China's Uighurs and other Turkic Muslims, slapping sanctions on several senior officials. Three officials will be refused US visas and see any US-based assets frozen including Chen Quanguo, the Chinese Communist Party chief for the Xinjiang region and architect of Beijing's hardline policies against restive minorities. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the United States was acting against "horrific and systematic abuses" in the western region including forced labor, mass detention and involuntary population control.


As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in Jacksonville

As COVID cases spike in Florida, Trump now says he's 'flexible' on convention format in JacksonvilleWith coronavirus cases exploding in Florida, the president now says he is “flexible” on plans to hold a large-scale, indoor Republican National Convention next month.


An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violation

An Austin police officer appeared to grope a woman's breast after pulling her over for a traffic violationThe Austin Police Department defended the officer's conduct, saying he followed the department's regulations and that no female officer was available.


Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'

Mexico posts new case record to overtake Spain; official says virus 'slowing'Mexico on Wednesday posted a fresh record for new coronavirus cases reported on a single day, with 6,995 infections, overtaking Spain to register the world's eighth highest case count, according to a Reuters tally. Despite the soaring figures, Mexico's coronavirus czar, Hugo Lopez-Gatell, said the pandemic was "slowing." The figures pushed Mexico's overall tally of infections to 275,003 cases.


Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China fury

Australia offers safe haven to Hong Kongers, sparking China furyAustralia offered pathways to permanent residency for thousands of people from Hong Kong on Thursday in response to China's crackdown on dissent, drawing a furious reply from Beijing. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said his government was suspending its extradition agreement with the city and, in addition to extending the visas of 10,000 Hong Kongers already in the country, threw open the door to thousands more wanting to start a new life Down Under. Morrison said the decisions were taken in response to China's imposition last week of a tough new security law in Hong Kong, which he said "constitutes a fundamental change of circumstances" for the semi-autonomous territory.


Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school says

Frat parties to blame for surge in coronavirus cases at UC Berkeley, school saysThe new cases could impact the fall semester.


Twitter billionaire Jack Dorsey just announced he will be funding a universal basic income experiment that could affect up to 7 million people

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Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of it

Man who flies Nazi flag from his car to show he is in ‘total opposition of Black Lives Matter’ claims he was attacked because of itA man who flies a Nazi flag on the back of his car to show his opposition to Black Lives Matter protests and gay people, claims he was attacked last month because of it.Jesus Seineke, who lives in Alpine, San Diego, flies a Nazi flag on the back of his SUV when he drives around his local area.


Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'

Israel looked like a model for halting coronavirus. Here's how it 'lost its bearings.'"It has been several weeks since Israel's compass for handling the pandemic has lost its bearings," wrote the public health director in her resignation.


Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in Kashmir

Militants kill BJP politician Wasim Bari and his family in KashmirA Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party politician was killed along with his brother and father in Indian administered Kashmir, officials said on Thursday. Wasim Bari, 38, and his family were attacked by militants at his residence in north Kashmir's Bandipora district on Wednesday night. All three were shot at point-blank range and died on the way to hospital. Authorities have arrested all 11 police personnel who were guarding him for dereliction of duties. Mr Bari's residence is a few meters away from the police station. This is the first attack on BJP workers in Kashmir after abrogation of Article 370 on August 5, 2019, when India stripped off the disputed region's autonomy. The killing of Mr Bari, who is survived by his wife and sister, has sent shock waves across political circles in Kashmir. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has condemned the attack.


Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unity

Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unityPolitical task forces Joe Biden formed with onetime rival Bernie Sanders to solidify support among the Democratic Party's progressive wing recommended Wednesday that the former vice president embrace major proposals to combat climate change and institutional racism while expanding health care coverage and rebuilding a coronavirus-ravaged economy. The groups, formed in May to tackle health care, immigration, education, criminal justice reform, climate change and the economy, sought to hammer out a policy road map to best defeat President Donald Trump.


Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research Groups

Feds: Top Ohio State Immunologist Lied About Chinese Funding and Ties to Research GroupsFederal prosecutors allege that a top immunologist at Ohio State University illegally concealed Chinese funding for his research and attempted to flee the country before his arrest in Alaska in May.In a criminal complaint unsealed on Thursday, the Justice Department accuses Song Guo Zheng, the Ronald L. Whisler MD Chair in Rheumatology and Immunology at Ohio State’s medical school, of fraudulently obtaining federal grant funds from the National Institutes of Health and making false statements to investigators.Zheng, prosecutors say, obtained nearly $5 million in federal research grants without disclosing ties to Chinese entities and additional grant funds provided by them. The complaint and other filings in a federal court in Ohio indicate that Zheng has long been affiliated with Chinese research efforts called “Talent Plans” that U.S. officials have alleged are integral to Chinese government efforts to boost scientific and technological advancement in the country by having experts train and conduct research in the United States and elsewhere.According to prosecutors, Ohio State placed Zheng on administrative leave while it conducted its own investigation into those alleged omissions. Zheng, they say, quickly began making plans to return to his native China.Zheng’s attorneys have not directly responded to the allegations in court. But the transcript of his arraignment indicates that Zheng, a U.S. permanent resident, has denied the charges against him. “I understand” the charges, Zheng told the court through a translator, “but I disagree with all of them.”Ohio State confirmed that Zheng was an employee and said he’d been placed on unpaid leave, but declined to comment further. “Ohio State has been and continues to assist federal law enforcement authorities in every way possible,” a university spokesperson told The Daily Beast in an email. “We cannot comment further at this time due to the ongoing law enforcement investigation.”The U.S. Attorney’s office in the Southern District of Ohio declined to comment when The Daily Beast first inquired about the Alaska arrest in late May. However, they provided a statement on Thursday after the criminal complaint was unsealed.“We allege that Zheng was preparing to flee the country after he learned that his employer had begun an administrative process into whether or not he was complying with rules governing taxpayer-funded grants,” said David M. DeVillers, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. “This is our office’s third recent case involving the illegal transfer of intellectual property and research to China. This underscores our commitment to work with the FBI, the Department of Health and Human Services, and our research institutions to protect our country’s position as a global leader in research and innovation, and to punish those who try to exploit and undermine that position.”  A lawyer for Zheng did not respond to repeated requests for information. Efforts to reach Zheng personally were not successful.Zheng’s case is just the latest federal prosecution of a U.S. academic whom the DOJ alleges had undisclosed ties to Chinese interests or funders. The department has also recently gone after researchers at Harvard University and the University of Kansas. In public remarks this week, the FBI Director Chris Wray stated, “We’ve now reached the point where the FBI is opening a new China-related counterintelligence case about every 10 hours.”Prosecutors say Zheng’s case revolves around a failure to disclose Chinese funding in grant applications during his time at OSU and at two previous jobs at the University of Southern California and Pennsylvania State University.Zheng “had received numerous admonishments from both NIH and OSU regarding conflicts of interest, and I believe he failed to disclose his overseas activities because he knew they placed his NIH funding at risk,” an FBI agent investigating the case told the court. According to prosecutors, Zheng gave conflicting answers when asked if he was involved with China’s Talent Plan programs. Zheng told a law enforcement interviewed that he “had been recruited into the PRC talent plans but he did not accept the position because he did not want to spend nine months of the year in the PRC.” But later in the interview, he appeared to acknowledge his participation, saying “he did not know he had to report his affiliation with talent plans.”According to the criminal complaint, OSU notified Zheng of its administrative investigation in mid-May. Six days later, prosecutors say, he left Columbus, “contacted a friend and was afforded a seat on a charter flight back to the PRC and packed up numerous electronic devices and a significant amount of personal items.” Prosecutors also presented evidence that Zheng and his wife planned to sell their house in Ohio.Prosecutors characterized that as an attempt by Zheng to flee the country. He was stopped at the Ted Stevens airport in Alaska. Zheng allegedly used his Chinese passport to board the flight and when the plane was deboarded, he quickly gave his carry-on luggage to a passenger he did not know. “When confronted,” prosecutors said, “Zheng initially indicated he was moving permanently, then changed his story to indicate he was visiting a sick relative and later added he was looking for a job in the PRC.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college

Joe Shapiro's widow says her late husband met Donald Trump in college	Raw video: Pam Shriver says her late husband met Trump after he was already enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania.


Explosion heard in western Tehran: Iran state media
Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in Florida

Pence says ‘early indications’ show COVID-19 prevention measures working in FloridaVice President Mike Pence on Wednesday said the White House coronavirus task force sees signs COVID-19 prevention measures are working in Florida.


The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet

The Mayor of Phoenix said she only found out the city was getting a 'significant' federal coronavirus testing site from a tweet"I'm obviously deeply concerned about...the ability of our healthcare system to respond to this increase in cases," Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego said.


Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'

Ohio sheriff refuses to enforce governor's mask order: 'I'm not going to be the mask police'An Ohio sheriff said he won't enforce Governor Mike DeWine's order making face masks mandatory in states with high rates of Covid-19 infections.Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones appeared on CNN Wednesday and told anchor Brianna Keilar that while he wears a mask and is "good with that," he has no plans on enforcing the governor's mask order.


'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job

'I feel threatened': Unmasked Florida man's viral Costco outburst cost him his job"He absolutely does not represent our values and no longer works at our agency," the CEO of Ted Todd Insurance said Tuesday.


15 Platform Beds to Elevate Your Bedroom Style
Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden

Fox News host refuses to listen to the Trump campaign's latest attack on Biden"Whoah," the host said after a Trump spokesman claimed Biden "coaxed children up onto his porch during quarantine" and "children love his leg hair."


Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man

Lightning strike kills Delaware County man, Philadelphia man
      Two men, one from Philadelphia and another from Delaware County, were killed during a lightning storm in northern Pennsylvania.


The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’

The Fall of Florida’s Biggest Sham ‘Church’ Peddling Bleach as a ‘Sacrament’The leader of Florida’s biggest sham “church” network peddling bleach as a miracle drug says he’s camped out in Colombia while his sons face arrest for allegedly selling a fake COVID-19 cure and threatening a judge with a “Waco”-style standoff.For years, the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing has been at the center of a lucrative, world-wide network that claims—falsely—that drinking glorified Clorox can cure you of virtually any illness. The “church” (which is not religious, by its own admission) has raked in the cash promoting “Miracle Mineral Solution,” a bleach solution first popularized in 2006 by an ex-Scientologist who claimed to be an alien god. Ludicrous as the scheme sounds, it’s seen a recent surge in visibility, gaining endorsements from conspiracy theorists and well-known conservatives. Now, four members of the family behind Genesis II are facing criminal charges for allegedly flouting an order to stop marketing MMS as a COVID-19 cure. Two have been arrested, while the family patriarch says he’s out of the country.Genesis II isn’t a real church. You can’t worship at a physical location, and its leader, “Archbishop” Mark Grenon, is not actually ordained. Instead, it’s a network of people peddling sodium chlorite, a bleach compound that the Food and Drug Administration warned in 2019 “can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration.” Nevertheless, Genesis II has thrived in recent years. The church’s founder, Jim Humble, is a former Scientologist who claims to be a billion-year-old space god from another galaxy. Humble worked with Genesis II for years, before appearing to back away from the church after an ABC News investigation. QAnon-ers’ Magic Cure for Coronavirus: Just Drink Bleach!"There are certainly times I have said some things that I probably should have said differently,” he wrote in a 2016 blog post. “For lack of a better way to express things at the time— or because others put words in my mouth, in the past I have stated that MMS cures most of all diseases. Today, I say that MMS cures nothing!"The revelation didn’t stop Mark Grenon and his sons Joseph, Jordan, and Jonathan from peddling bleach. The family and their “church” raked it in for years, media investigations and criminal charges show. In one investigation, an undercover news crew attended one of Grenon’s $450 MMS seminars in a California hotel. There, Grenon hinted at the church’s lack of real religious convictions.“Everybody start a church and do it from there. You can sell them anything! Tell them Jesus heals you while you drink this,” Grenon said.Federal investigators apparently pursued those claims as the basis of a fraud charge. In a February 2020 interview, cited in the criminal complaint, Grenon told investigators he’d started a church in order to sell MMS.“Everything you do commercially is under the Universal Commercial code, okay?” Grenon said, according to the complaint. “A church is completely separate from that code, statutes, and laws. That’s why a priest can give a kid wine in church publicly and not get arrested. Because it’s a sacrament.[…] I knew this because . . . they tried to arrest us for proclaiming stuff on the street in Boston. They threw it out of court because we’re a church. You can’t arrest us from doing one of our sacraments, and I knew this. So that’s why . . . I said let’s do a church. We could have done temple. We could have done synagogue. We could have done mosque.” “So [the founding of Genesis] wasn’t really about religion?” the investigator asked. “It was in order to – to in a way, legalize the use of MMS?”“Right,” Grenon replied. “It wasn’t at all religious.” (On its website, Genesis II claims to be “non-religious but spiritual.”)Although the criminal complaint indicates Genesis II and the Grenons were under investigation by at least October 2019 (when they allegedly gave an undercover FDA investigator terrible cancer treatment advice), federal scrutiny on the church intensified when it started promoting MMS as a coronavirus cure. The FDA sent Genesis II an injunction, telling them to please stop doing that. But the church allegedly continued, advertising “testimonials” that promoted potentially virus-spreading activity. One reviewer, featured in a Genesis II newsletter, claimed to have “traveled to the Philippines and had to pass through Seoul, Korea and Tokyo, Japan airports where just about everyone was wearing the masks for coronavirus. We had no fear (and no masks) because we had MMS protection. We are back home and everyone is still healthy.”The Grenons also allegedly made violent threats against the judge who signed the injunction. In an April podcast, Mark Grenon and his son Joseph stated that they would not obey the restraining order.“You’ve got the 2nd [Amendment]. Right? When Congress does immoral things, passes immoral laws, that’s when you pick up guns, right?,” one said. “You want a Waco? Do they want a Waco?” In a later podcast, Grenon accused the judge of “treason,” and in a third podcast warned that the judge “could be taken out.”Grenon and his three sons were charged with “conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.” Their Bradenton, Florida headquarters were raided on Wednesday, and Jordan and Johnathan arrested. It was not immediately clear whether either had lawyers.Mark Grenon, meanwhile, was at large as of Thursday morning. Genesis II has associates worldwide, particularly in Africa and South America. (Genesis II and other bleach sellers have faced particular scrutiny for giving bleach to African children.) None of the seven Genesis II chapters in the U.S., Canada, or Colombia that listed their phone numbers online answered the phone or returned The Daily Beast’s calls.In an “emergency” interview with the founder of a conspiracy theory-laden “health news” site after the raid, Grenon revealed that he was in Colombia, where he expected to be arrested and extradited.Questioned by an interviewer who called the FDA a “terrorist organization,” Grenon stuck to his old argument that Genesis II was a legitimate religious organization.“The FDA says we should stop giving our sacraments to the world. We just basically said no, we have the First Amendment,” he said. “It says we have free exercise of our religious beliefs.”Asked about his bleach’s medical validity, Grenon described MMS as “so real. I had projectile vomiting from bad sushi. I took it and within a couple of minutes, gone.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over police

New York attorney general recommends reducing mayor's power over policeNew York Attorney General Letitia James recommended that New York City's mayor give up sole control over the city police commissioner's hiring, in a preliminary report released on Wednesday on her investigation into the policing of recent protests. "There should be an entirely new accountability structure for NYPD," James said in her report, which also recommended giving more power to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, a city agency that reviews police misconduct.


Wisconsin police officer rescues dog from burning house
US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buy

US gives the green light to Japan’s massive $23B F-35 buyJapan is set to become the fourth operator of the F-35B short takeoff and landing variant.


Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-ahead

Texas carries out its first execution during pandemic after Supreme Court gives go-aheadTexas has executed its first death row inmate since it first confirmed a case of coronavirus after a Supreme Court ruling allowed his execution to go ahead.Billy Joe Wardlow, 45, was sentenced to death in 1993 for a robbery and murder in which he and his girlfriend tried to rob 82-year-old Carl Cole of his truck using a .45-calibre gun. Mr Wardlow fired the gun in a struggle, and Cole was killed; the couple were arrested two days later.


If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollars

If Trump strips international student visas, these states will lose hundreds of millions of dollarsSix states had half the international student enrollment.


Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentence

Former India navy officer refuses to appeal spying death sentenceA former Indian naval officer on death row in Pakistan for alleged spying has refused to lodge an appeal against his conviction and will try instead for a military pardon, an official said Wednesday. Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav was arrested in 2016 in Pakistan's restive southwestern province of Balochistan -- a region where Islamabad has long accused New Delhi of backing separatist rebels.


Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say

Trump flag angered man so he dumped trash on resident’s lawn for months, NJ cops say“Some people are very passionate about their opinions.”


Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leaders

Top US general slams Confederacy as 'an act of treason' and says the country needs to take 'hard look' at bases honoring its leadersThe Confederacy "was an act of treason at the time against the Union, against the Stars and Stripes, against the US Constitution," Gen. Mark Milley said.


El Salvador murder rate plummets; study says gangs may have informal pact with government
University of California names first Black president

University of California names first Black presidentMichael Drake will be the first black president in the university system's 152-year history.


Virginia eliminates huge backlog of untested rape kits
GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ Proposal

GOP Senators Preparing $1.3 Trillion Coronavirus Aid Package to Counter House Dems’ ProposalRepublican senators are piecing together an additional coronavirus aid package to counter House Democrats' phase-4 aid proposal.The GOP bill in its current form will provide an additional $1.3 trillion in economic aid to U.S. taxpayers and businesses, CNN reported on Wednesday evening. House Democrats have already proposed their own $3 trillion aid package, however Senate Republicans have pushed back on the high price tag."It won’t be $3 trillion. That bill is not going anywhere," Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said on Wednesday. The GOP proposal will likely include aid to schools, hospitals, and businesses, along with liability protections for companies.The Republican caucus has urged caution when passing additional aid packages, preferring to study the effects of previous legislation to make sure the aid is effective in keeping the U.S. economy afloat. McConnell said that talks with Democrats on a new round of aid would be more difficult "because of the proximity to the election.""It is unclear to me right now how we will resolve several contentious issues," Senator Chris Coons (D., Conn.) told CNN, echoing McConnell. "It's going to be a rough road. There are a lot of competing interests. A lot."House Democrats may also piece together an infrastructure spending bill to offset some of the economic effects of the pandemic. The idea for an infrastructure bill has received support from Republicans including President Trump, as well as Senators Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), Roy Blunt (R., Mo.), and Roger Wicker (R., Miss.).


NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quit

NYPD forced to impose limit on officers filing for retirement amid 400% surge of personnel trying to quitThe New York Police Department (NYPD) has reportedly limited the number of retirement applications it will allow, after it saw a surge in requests in the last couple of months.The NYPD announced on Wednesday that 179 officers filed for retirement between 29 June and 6 July – a 411 per cent increase on the 35 who retired in the same time period in 2019.


These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.

These Arizona teachers shared a classroom for summer school. All 3 contracted COVID-19. 1 died.An Arizona teacher is dead after contracting COVID-19. Two others tested positive after teaching in the same classroom. They hope schools stay closed.


Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker

Environmental Injustice Is Another Form of 'Assault on Black Bodies,' Says Sen. Cory Booker'The biggest determining factor of whether you live around toxicity is the color of your skin'


DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissal

DC judge asks for full appeal review of Flynn dismissalThe U.S. District Court judge who oversaw the criminal case of President Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn has requested a full appeals court review after a three-judge panel ordered him to dismiss it. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan made the highly unusual the request Thursday. A three-judge panel last month ordered Sullivan to dismiss the case against Flynn, following the Justice Department's extraordinary decision to drop the prosecution.


Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump

Left urges Joe Biden to limit debates against President Trump	New York Times opinion writer Tom Friedman says Biden should refuse to debate Trump unless he releases his tax returns; Jacqui Heinrich reports.


Bosnian Serb government indoctrinating children over Srebrenica, U.N. tribunal head says
The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on Amazon

The United States does not want Cuba and Venezuela to buy on AmazonA minor nuisance that comes with U.S. sanctions is having to say goodbye to buying on Amazon.


Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for life

Arrests and police raids follow Russia's vote to let Putin rule for lifeAn opposition governor was detained and several activists had their homes raided by the police on Thursday as Russia’s latest crackdown on dissent gathers momentum. The flurry of arrests and criminal inquiries follow last week’s vote in which nearly 78 percent endorsed constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay as president at least until 2036 when he turns 83. Sergei Furgal, the governor of the Khabarovsk region in Russia’s Far East who beat a Kremlin candidate at the 2018 election, was arrested by camouflaged agents of Russia’s top investigative body on Thursday morning and put on a plane to Moscow. The popular governor whose landslide win at the polls embarrassed the pro-Kremlin party, is accused of organising two contract killings as well as an attempted murder 15 years ago, according to the Investigative Committee, Russia's main federal investigating authority. Mr Furgal has not been charged with any crime. An unnamed source claiming to be linked to Mr Furgal says he has denied the allegations. Mr Furgal had been in Russian parliament for more than a decade before he won the Khabarovsk election in 2018, which has raised questions about the timing of the charges brought against him.


Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education system

Navy SEAL who oversaw bin Laden raid says America's biggest national security issue is the K-12 education systemThe US needs an education system that informs students about the world around them, retired Navy Adm. William McRaven said.


'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returns

'Opioid overdoses are skyrocketing': as Covid-19 sweeps across US an old epidemic returnsThe pandemic is creating the social conditions – no jobs, isolation, despair – that helped enable the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place. Now it’s backIn West Virginia, they are bracing for the second wave.The epidemic that hit the Appalachian state harder than any other in the US finally looked to be in retreat. Now it’s advancing again. Not coronavirus but opioid overdoses, with one scourge driving a resurgence of the other.Covid-19 has claimed 93 lives in West Virginia over the past three months. That is only a fraction of those killed by drug overdoses, which caused nearly 1,000 deaths in the state in 2018 alone, mostly from opioids but also methamphetamine (also known as meth).That year was better than the one before as the Appalachian state appeared to turn the tide on an epidemic that has ravaged the region for two decades, destroying lives, tearing apart families and dragging down local economies.Now coronavirus looks to be undoing the advances made against a drug epidemic that has claimed close to 600,000 lives in the US over the past two decades. Worse, it is also laying the ground for a long-term resurgence of addiction by exacerbating many of the conditions, including unemployment, low incomes and isolation, that contributed to the rise of the opioid epidemic and “deaths of despair”.“The number of opioid overdoses is skyrocketing and I don’t think it will be easily turned back,” said Dr Mike Brumage, former director of the West Virginia office of drug control policy.“Once the tsunami of Covid-19 finally recedes, we’re going to be left with the social conditions that enabled the opioid crisis to emerge in the first place, and those are not going to go away.”To Brumage and others, coronavirus has also shown what can happen when the government takes a public health emergency seriously, unlike the opioid epidemic, which was largely ignored even as the death toll climbed into the hundreds of thousands.The American Medical Association said it was “greatly concerned” at reported increases in opioid overdoses in more than 30 states although it will be months before hard data is available.> Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection> > Dr Mike BrumagePublic health officials from Kentucky to Florida, Texas and Colorado have recorded surges in opioid deaths as the economic and social anxieties created by the Covid-19 pandemic prove fertile ground for addiction. In addition, Brumage said significant numbers of people have fallen out of treatment programmes as support networks have been yanked away by social distancing orders.“I’m a firm adherent to the idea that the opposite of addiction is not sobriety, the opposite of addiction is connection. Clearly, what we have lost with the pandemic is a loss of connection,” he said.“Many of the people who were using the programme either didn’t have broadband or they didn’t have cellphone service, especially those who were homeless. They just fell out of the programme,” he said.The resurgence was not unforeseen. In March, as Covid-19 escalated, Donald Trump warned about the human toll beyond lives claimed by the virus. “You’re going to have tremendous suicides, but you know what you’re going to have more than anything else? Drug addiction. You will see drugs being used like nobody has ever used them before. And people are going to be dying all over the place from drug addiction,” he said.Brumage and others who spoke to the Guardian were at pains to say they believed the scale of the government’s response to Covid-19 is necessary. But they saw the mobilisation of financial resources and political will to cope with the virus in stark contrast to the response of successive administrations to the opioid epidemic.Emily Walden lost her son to an opioid overdose and now heads Fed Up!, a group campaigning to reduce the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing levels.“Congress immediately acted with coronavirus to help those that lost their jobs, to make sure that people were taken care of and it was addressed properly,” she said. “Look at the difference with the opioid epidemic, which has largely been ignored by our federal government for 20 years.”While the US government has thrown $6tn at coronavirus, the Trump administration dedicated just $6bn to directly dealing with opioid addiction over his first two years in office even though about the same number of people died of drug overdoses in that period as have now been lost to Covid-19.Brumage said federal health institutions have shifted their focus to coronavirus, including freezing a $1bn research project to find less addictive pain treatments.> You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous> > Dr Mike Brumage“It’s robbed the oxygen out of the room and made it the sole focus of what’s happening,” said Brumage. “There’s also a fatigue about the opioid crisis. You can think of Covid-19 as a hurricane whereas the opioid crisis is more like global warming. It’s happening, it’s slow, it’s dangerous, but it’s not happening at the same speed and scale as the coronavirus is having right now.” Brumage attributes the difference in response in part to attitudes toward drug addiction.“The difference between getting Covid and dying of an overdose is stigma around drug use. This has been ingrained across the United States – that people using drugs are somehow seen as morally deficient and so it becomes easier then to other and alienate those people,” he said.Walden does not accept that explanation. Like many whose families have been devastated by opioids, she sees a personal and public health catastrophe perpetuated by the financial and political power of the pharmaceutical industry to drive the US’s exceptionally high opioid prescribing rates which were a major factor in driving the epidemic.“This comes down to lobbyists and money. People say it’s stigma and it’s not. There is stigma but it’s about profits and greed,” she said.Dr Raeford Brown, a former chair of the Food and Drug Administration’s opioid advisory committee, is a longstanding critic of drug industry influence over opioid medical policy and the government’s response to the epidemic. He sees a parallel with coronavirus with US states lifting strong social distancing orders too early under corporate pressure.“The United States is not good at doing public health,” he said. “It failed the test with opioids and it failed the test with viral pandemics. But coronavirus and pandemics, and the things like the opioid crisis, are much more likely to get us than the Russians or the Chinese are.”


Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow Republican

Maxine Waters Foe Omar Navarro Gets Out of Jail And Attempts to Destroy Fellow RepublicanPro-Trump internet personality Omar Navarro emerged from a six-month stint in jail on a stalking charge last month, and immediately registered to run for Congress. Navarro, a perennial challenger to Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), has registered to run for her seat again in 2022—assuming, perhaps logically, that Waters will once again prevail in her re-election request this November. But Navarro, who had nearly $50,000 in his campaign bank account as of March 31 even while he served his jail term, is not going to wait for those results before getting involved. He told The Daily Beast that he’s going to send out mailers this election cycle denouncing Joe Collins, the Republican nominee currently running against Waters.“Hey, I don’t agree with him,” Navarro told The Daily Beast. “I believe Maxine Waters is better than him.”Asked for comment on Navarro’s sour-grapes scheme to ruin Collins’s already slim chances of winning this fall, Collins responded  by accusing Navarro of having “daddy issues” without elaborating. "Omar Navarro is a joke,” Collins told The Daily Beast. “He has the mentality of a four year old child throwing a temper tantrum and the testicular fortitude of a mouse.” A Perennial Congressional Candidate Beloved by Trump World Was Just Arrested on Stalking ChargesThe scrapping between Collins and Navarro for the chance to lose to Waters highlights the odd incentives facing Republican challengers taking on famous incumbents in heavily Democratic districts. Running against Waters as a Republican would be a poor choice for anyone who actually wants to win. Indeed, Navarro has tried twice already, losing by more than 50 percentage points in 2016 and 2018. But for a GOPer interested in raising millions off of Waters’s notoriety as a devoted Trump foe, and increasing his profile in the pro-Trump mediasphere, it works out great. Navarro raked in donations from low-dollar contributors and saw his stature on the online Trump right explode thanks to his quixotic earlier campaigns. Even the candidates themselves acknowledge the money that’s at stake for whoever wins the right to face off against Waters. “The main reason Navarro is upset is because he's used to living off of his campaign donations and now he's facing the realization that, after being beaten by a real candidate with a shot at winning, he has to find a real job,” Collins said in his email. For Navarro, that time in the bright lights of online Trumpy fame came to a halt when he was arrested in December in San Francisco after stalking ex-girlfriend and fellow Republican personality DeAnna Lorraine Tesoriero, who herself was running a doomed campaign against Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA). Navarro eventually pleaded guilty to a stalking charge, and was sentenced to six months in San Francisco’s jail, where he claims to have lost 30 pounds. Even while imprisoned in San Francisco, Navarro kept up his political profile. And he stayed on the ballot, losing the March Republican primary to Collins by a mere 250 votes—a 0.3 percent difference in the vote total. Undeterred by that loss, Navarro has tried to recast himself since being released from jail as the latest victim of deep-state prosecutors. While other Trump supporters who faced criminal charges were involved in international intrigue, however, Navarro has been faced with claiming that he was arrested on a local stalking charge because of some secret government scheme. “Full disclosure with you guys: in the past six months, yes, I have been in a county jail,” Navarro told his more than 250,000 Twitter followers after being released from jail. Despite overwhelming evidence that Navarro violated Tesoriero’s restraining order against him, including the fact that Navarro bashed Tesoriero to The Daily Beast in apparent violation of the order, Navarro claims that he only pleaded guilty because he would have become a “political prisoner” if he hadn’t.“I wouldn’t have been judged by a jury of my peers, I would’ve been judged by a bunch of liberals, and they would have kept me locked up in there as a political prisoner,” Navarro said in his Twitter video. “And that’s not OK.” While it might seem strange for the recently imprisoned Navarro to be confident he can win the 2022 primary to challenge Waters, he is aided by the fact that Collins has a bizarre history of his own.A Navy veteran, Collins has continuously switched parties since 2016, cycling between being a Democrat, a Republican, a member of the Green Party, and a member of the “Millennial Political Party.” Collins has also filed a lawsuit over child support payments that is riddled with language echoing the nonsense legal language used by members of the far-right sovereign citizen movement. At one point in his lawsuit, in an apparent attempt to deploy a fringe legal theory, Collins claimed that his bodily fluids were worth $15 million—a bizarre detail Navarro has seized on in his campaign to bring down his rival.   “You’re the guy that’s gonna take down Maxine Waters?” Navarro said in a video taunting Collins that he released in late June. “I’m sorry, but you’re not gonna do that. And by the way, your bodily fluids are not worth $15 million.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changed

I did 100 push-ups a day for 100 days in lockdown and was amazed by how my body changedThe hardest part of the challenge turned out to be mental instead of physical, senior lifestyle reporter Rachel Hosie found.


César Duarte: Fugitive Mexican ex-governor arrested in Miami

César Duarte: Fugitive Mexican ex-governor arrested in MiamiCésar Duarte fled Mexico in 2018 after being accused of embezzling millions to fund a lavish lifestyle.


Philadelphia waives 100s of protest-related code violations
India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign students

India raises concerns with U.S. over new rules for foreign studentsIndia has conveyed its concerns to the United States about a new immigration order that could force a large number of Indian students to return home, the foreign ministry said on Thursday. U.S. President Donald Trump's administration issued a new rule this week that would bar foreign students from remaining in the United States if their universities are not holding in-person classes during the upcoming fall semester because of coronavirus. "We have urged the U.S. side that we need to keep in mind the role that educational exchanges and people to people relations have played in the development of our relations," Anurag Srivastava, spokesman at India's foreign ministry told a news conference.


Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops say

Two arrested after coughing on Walmart employees, refusing to wear masks, AZ cops sayPolice said one of the suspects tried to flee the scene.


In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rights

In first, US punishes senior Chinese officials over Uighur rightsThe United States on Thursday took its first major action to stop "horrific" abuses against China's Uighurs and other Turkic Muslims, slapping sanctions on several senior officials. Three officials will be refused US visas and see any US-based assets frozen including Chen Quanguo, the Chinese Communist Party chief for the Xinjiang region and architect of Beijing's hardline policies against restive minorities. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the United States was acting against "horrific and systematic abuses" in the western region including forced labor, mass detention and involuntary population control.