Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdownTrump repeated a favorite refrain of some conservatives, who have said that the coronavirus “cure”—that is, a nationwide shutdown—cannot be worse than the disease itself.


Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News ExplainsCoronavirus patients are showing a wide range of symptoms and the exact reason why is still a mystery — but we do have some clues as to what factors can influence the severity of the disease.


Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-ed

Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-edTweed Roosevelt, in a New York Times op-ed, said his great-grandfather would have done the same thing as Crozier.


Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital

Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital“We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,” the queen said, echoing a World War II-era song.


3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.

3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.Lockdown measures in Italy, Spain and France appear to be bearing fruit after three weeks, with daily death tolls beginning to decline.


'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.

'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.A doctor treating COVID-19 patients sits down with her husband to make a will.


U.K. Virus Deaths Slow as Government Mulls Tighter Lockdown
Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisis

Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisisCoronavirus crisis proves communism is still a grave threat to the entire world. If Beijing had just been honest, the pandemic could be preventable.


Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugees

Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugeesMalaysian authorities said they have arrested a boatload of 202 people believed to be minority Muslim Rohingya refugees after their boat was found adrift Sunday morning near the northern resort island of Langkawi. A Northern District maritime official, Capt. Zulinda Ramly, said the refugees included 152 men, 45 women and five children. Zulinda said maritime officials have taken precautionary measures to prevent any possible transmission of the COVID-19 virus while handling the group.


Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?

Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?While the term “warfare” is a useful metaphor for the kind of mobilization necessary to save lives in this crisis, it’s not a useful way to think about the primary responsibility of ordinary citizens right now, which is to stay at home.


Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDP

Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDPJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged on Monday to roll out an unprecedented economic stimulus package, equal to 20% of economic output, as his government vowed to take "all steps" to battle deepening fallout from the coronavirus. The package, to be confirmed by the cabinet on Tuesday, will total 108 trillion yen ($989 billion), far exceeding one compiled in the wake of the 2009 financial crisis totalling 56 trillion yen in size, with fiscal spending of 15 trillion yen. "We decided to carry out an unprecedentedly massive scale of economic package worth 108 trillion yen, or 20% of GDP, following the immense damage to the economy from the novel coronavirus," Abe told reporters after a meeting with senior ruling party lawmakers.


Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19

Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19The Bronx Zoo in New York says this case of human-to-animal transmission appears to be unique.


U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come

U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come"It's going to be the hardest moment for many Americans in their entire lives," Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on MSNBC's Meet the Press.


An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears

An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fearsExperts predicted the stresses of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns could lead to an uptick in domestic violence.


Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsens

Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsensWith most elective surgeries cancelled during the pandemic, hospitals experiencing revenue loss are furloughing staff members in the middle of the pandemic


‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic Drowning

‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic DrowningMaeve Kennedy Townsend McKean’s husband has posted a heartbreaking tribute to his wife—the granddaughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy—and the couple’s child, who went missing in the Chesapeake Bay Thursday afternoon.The Kennedy family announced Friday that the Coast Guard suspended the rescue effort for McKean, 40, and son Gideon, 8, who disappeared after paddling a canoe out into the bay. The effort to recover their remains is ongoing.“The search that began yesterday afternoon went on throughout the night and continued all day today,” McKean’s husband, David McKean, wrote in a Facebook post late Friday. “It is now dark again. It has been more than 24 hours, and the chances they have survived are impossibly small. It is clear that Maeve and Gideon have passed away.”The family had been self-quarantining from the novel coronavirus in a house on the bay owned by McKean’s mother, former Maryland Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, according to her husband’s post. The largely empty house provided them with more space to ride out the pandemic than their D.C. home, he said.McKean and her son were playing on a beach in a small, shallow cove behind the house at around 4 p.m. when one of them accidentally kicked a ball into the water. The two attempted to retrieve the ball by paddling a canoe into the protected cove, but ended up in the open bay where strong winds during the day had whipped up vicious currents.“The cove is protected, with much calmer wind and water than in the greater Chesapeake,” David McKean wrote. “They got into a canoe, intending simply to retrieve the ball, and somehow got pushed by wind or tide into the open bay.”About 30 minutes later, an onlooker called emergency services to report seeing the pair struggling to paddle to the shore. That was the last anyone saw of them. The Coast Guard recovered their capsized canoe miles away from the beach at 7 p.m. Friday.David McKean wrote tenderly of his late son, recalling his love of sports and strong morals.“He was deeply compassionate, declining to sing children’s songs if they contained a hint of animals or people being treated cruelly,” he wrote. “And he was brave, leading his friends in games, standing up to people who he thought were wrong (including his parents), and relishing opportunities to go on adventures with friends, even those he’d just met.”“I used to marvel at him as a toddler and worry that he was too perfect to exist in this world,” he added. “It seems to me now that he was.”His wife, McKean wrote, was “magical,” with “endless energy” and a laugh you could hear a block away.“Maeve turned 40 in November, and she was my everything,” he wrote. “She was my best friend and my soulmate. I have already thought many times over today that I need to remember to tell Maeve about something that’s happening. I am terrified by the idea that this will fade over time.”The couple met while working for Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and were married in 2003. Maeve served in the Peace Corp, with the State Department’s global AIDS program, and in the Obama administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, before signing on as executive director of the Georgetown University Global Health Initiative.“Maeve was vivid,” her mother, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, said in a statement Friday night. “You always knew when she was in a room. Her laughter was loud, unabashed and infectious.” McKean’s cousin, Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), posted on Twitter: “We love you Maeve. We love you Gideon. Our family has lost two of the brightest lights.”McKean is survived by her 7-year-old daughter, Gabriella, and 2-year-old son, Toby. “I know soon he will start to ask for Maeve and Gideon,” her husband wrote of Toby. “It breaks my heart that he will not get to have them as a mother and brother.”In his Facebook post, David McKean asked friends and family to share photos of his late wife and son.“As Gabriella and Toby lay sleeping next to me last night, I promised them that I would do my best to be the parent that Maeve was, and to be the person that Gideon clearly would have grown up to be,” he wrote. “Part of that is keeping their memories alive.”The Kennedy family has endured an extraordinary amount of tragedy over several generations, from the high-profile assassinations of McKean’s grandfather and great-uncle to the fatal plane crash that killed John F. Kennedy Jr., to the heart attack that killed Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s niece, Kara, in 2011 and the death by suicide of his ex-wife, Mary, in 2012.Just last year, McKean’s cousin, Saoirse Roisin Kennedy Hill, died of an accidental drug overdose at the Kennedy family compound in Cape Cod.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers

Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippersThe largest maritime operation ever undertaken in Sydney Harbour was completed on Sunday with the successful restocking and refuelling of five cruise ships, Australian police said. It was part of government efforts since mid-March to force vessels to leave the country's waters to prevent any further spread of the coronavirus in Australia. Cruise ship guests have so far accounted for almost 10 percent of Australia's more than 5,500 infections.


Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.


Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirusJust a little over a month after saying there was no need for the community at large to wear masks in public, the CDC has changed its mind, recommending that all Americans should wear some sort of face covering when venturing outside.


Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly

Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly“As an Inspector General, I was legally obligated to ensure that whistleblowers had an effective and authorized means to disclose urgent matter.”


Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price war

Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price warSaudi Arabia is taking unprecedented action in delaying the release of its international crude selling prices by five days, a senior Saudi source familiar with the matter said on Sunday, as the kingdom and other major producers seek to halt the free-fall in worldwide crude prices. A month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic, has cut the price of crude to $34 a barrel from $65.


Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar

Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soarThe measures aim to avert a major outbreak in its major cities but fall short of a lockdown.


Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank

Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bankAt least five children ate candy containing high THC doses after the Utah Food Bank distributed it as part of their food donations, police said.


A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up there

A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up thereThe Princess Cruises ship was one of several cruise ships stuck at sea seeking a port, and was turned away several times before reaching Miami.


Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month

Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month(Bloomberg) -- The deadly coronavirus may infect as many as 95,000 people in Indonesia by next month before easing, a minister said, as authorities ordered people to wear face masks to contain the pandemic.The dire forecast, which came as the country reported its biggest daily spike in confirmed cases, is based on a projection by the nation’s intelligence agency, University of Indonesia and Bandung Institute of Technology, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told lawmakers in Jakarta. The estimate was discussed at a cabinet meeting held by President Joko Widodo earlier on Monday, she said.Indonesia has seen a surge in infections in recent weeks after reporting its first cases only in early March. While the death toll from the pandemic at 209 is the highest in Asia after China, confirmed cases at 2,491 in a country of almost 270 million people is fewer than those reported in smaller countries such as Malaysia and the Philippines. Authorities reported 218 new Covid-19 cases on Monday. “The situation is very dynamic,” Indrawati said. “The government continues to monitor and take more steps as estimates show that the cases may peak in April and May.”Jokowi, as Widodo is known, has declared a national health emergency and ordered large scale social distancing to contain the spread of the virus that has infected almost 1.3 million people worldwide. On Monday, the president ordered authorities to ensure availability of face masks for every household as he appealed to citizens to cover their faces to contain the pandemic.The world’s fourth-most populous nation, along with India and the Philippines, could soon become the next Covid-19 hot spots given their large populations, weak health care infrastructure and social security net, according to Nomura Holdings Inc.Mortality RateThe highest mortality rate in Asia may signal the actual number of infections may be much higher than reported in Indonesia, reflecting a lack of Covid-19 testing capacity, Nomura said in a report last week. The country may eventually be forced to implement a complete lockdown in April and possibly for an extended period, Nomura said.The president has rejected calls to lock down cities and regions to fight the virus, saying such harsh steps would hurt the poor the most. But the surge in cases has overwhelmed the country’s health care system, with authorities struggling to procure enough personal protection equipment, hazmat suits and ventilators for medical workers.Some local administrations have sought permission to impose large scale social distancing measures under a new rule issued by the Health Ministry, Doni Monardo, chief of the government’s task force on coronavirus said Monday. The steps will allow police and other law enforcement agencies to take “measurable actions”, according to officials.Indonesia Slashes Growth Forecast by More Than Half on Virus The police will step up a crackdown on gathering of people across the archipelago to aid the government efforts to break the virus chain, national police spokesman Argo Yuwono said in a televised briefing Monday. Law enforcement agencies have also investigated more than a dozen cases of hoarding of food, masks and other essential supplies and price gouging, he said.Jokowi said a plan to release prisoners from the nation’s crowded jails should be limited to those serving terms for general crimes and not those convicted for corruption and other serious offenses. The president also ordered speedier reallocation of budget to tackle the health and economic impact of the pandemic, his office said in a statement.(Updates with latest coronavirus data in third paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Washington state returns ventilators for use in New York

Washington state returns ventilators for use in New YorkWashington Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that the state will return more than 400 ventilators of the 500 it has received from the federal government so they can go to New York and other states hit harder by the coronavirus. The Democratic governor said Sunday that his statewide stay-at-home order and weeks of social distancing have led to slower rates of infections and deaths in Washington. Washington state has 7,666 confirmed cases of the virus and 322 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday afternoon.


US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospital

US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospitalThe coronavirus threatened Americans with their hardest week in memory on Monday and put Britain's prime minister in hospital, despite early signs that some of Europe's hardest-hit countries may be turning a corner. Japan announced an imminent state of emergency and a trillion-dollar stimulus package, after the US surgeon general compared the likely impact of the epidemic in the week ahead to 9/11 or Pearl Harbor. In London, virus-stricken Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent the night in hospital for tests, after Queen Elizabeth II delivered a rare emergency address in a 68-year reign to urge Britain to "remain united and resolute".


'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisis

'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisisQueen Elizabeth II delivered a brief speech on Sunday during the growing coronavirus crisis.


Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus

Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not CoronavirusThe idea that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks—especially one who’s been rewarded for bad behavior—is particularly poignant when we consider President Trump’s firing Friday of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the Intelligence Community. Trump has a track record of firing and retaliating against officials who don’t blindly follow his orders and mimic his mood swings, no matter how unethical, illegal, dangerous, or irresponsible.At the same time, Trump has a track record of decimating our intelligence agencies. His history of insulting the intelligence community, cherry-picking intelligence to suit his personal narratives, prioritizing loyalty over experience, and rooting out anyone who speaks truth (a core mission of the intelligence community) that he doesn’t like have been the key themes underlining his relationship with the intelligence community.Plus, Trump has never supported oversight, unless of course it’s focused on Democrats. The impetus for Atkinson’s firing—namely his work to fulfill his statutory obligations to pass on what he judged to be an urgent and credible whistleblower complaint about the president’s call with Ukrainian President Zelensky—didn’t jibe with Trump’s personal desire to avoid oversight. Team Trump Stirs Up Completely Bogus Claim About WhistleblowerHis political cronies, House Republicans on the intelligence community, even started investigating Atkinson. The inspector general’s job is largely to detect fraud, waste, and mismanagement, not to be complicit in it. The IC IG’s mandate is to do so with integrity, professionalism, and independence. Atkinson fulfilled those responsibilities, and he was fired for doing so.But, Trump has largely escaped paying any price for his actions. The Republican Party for the most part has stayed silent about his degradation of intelligence and manipulation of oversight to shield himself.While Atkinson’s firing comes as no surprise in light of the president’s habitual misuse and abuse of the intelligence community, coupled with his disdain for oversight more broadly, it will have costs for U.S. national security today, tomorrow, and further down the road.The timing of Atkinson’s removal could not be worse. Trump’s decision to fire Atkinson in the midst of an unprecedented national crisis signals what his priorities are: his personal insecurity trumps national security. His need to settle a perceived vendetta and to remove someone who he perceives to have wronged him is putting additional pressure on an already strained IC. This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for the US government. The coronavirus crisis has introduced myriad new threats for the IC to analyze while concurrently straining resources as the workforce tries to protect itself through measures like social distancing, working from home, and shift work. This is not the time when the intelligence community needs any fewer competent officials on board. Nor is it the time to put more pressure on intelligence officials by introducing an unnecessary transition in IG leadership. That is a drain of resources as staff scramble to brief up the new acting IG. It’s undoubtedly a further blow to morale.And, Trump didn’t just fire Atkinson and allow him to serve out his statutorily outlined 30-day transition period. Atkinson reportedly didn’t know about his removal in advance and has now been placed on administration leave. The relevant statute requires that both intelligence committees be notified 30 days before the inspector general can be dismissed. By putting Atkinson on leave and not giving him the time to brief up his successor and transition his work there’s a real chance that someone drops the ball, somewhere, on critical work. But, then again, maybe that’s what the President is hoping for - that oversight is damaged. This may be an operational bonus for POTUS.An actual leader—a responsible president—would minimize pressure on the IC right now because they have critical national security work to do and cycling out one of the president’s perceived enemies doesn’t fall within that necessary for national security to do list. Atkinson’s removal is about retribution but it’s also about sending a message to the intel community at large and to everyone considering throwing their name in the mix as a nominee to fill Atkinson’s shoes. Trump’s letter to Congress regarding Atkinson’s firing noted that Atkinson no longer has his “fullest confidence.” However, there is no indication that Atkinson did not perform his job. In fact, the chairman of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency—an independent executive branch agency—and the IG of the Justice Department reacted to Atkinson’s removal in saying that “Inspector General Atkinson is known throughout the Inspector General community for his integrity, professionalism, and commitment to the rule of law and independent oversight.” Atkinson lost Trump’s confidence because he wouldn’t become a partisan tool when both as an IG and as a member of the intelligence community, objective, non-partisan work is part of the job description. Because of Trump’s actions, however, anyone considering taking the job will have to be willing not to uphold the law but to bend it to please POTUS.The broader and longer-term impact on recruitment and retention in the IC is that Trump has changed the cost benefit analysis associated with serving in the intelligence community right now. In the short term, at least, the IG’s office is hamstrung in its ability to fully function at a time when it is sorely needed for whistleblowers, for efficiency, and for oversight of critical intelligence-related issues impacting our national security, including coronavirus.Trump’s narcissism—his prioritization of self over country—is on full display. He’s never been known for his intelligence, but this latest move in a litany of dangerous behavior is going to cost us.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land borders

China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land bordersMainland China reported 39 new coronavirus cases as of Sunday, up from 30 a day earlier, and the number of asymptomatic cases also surged as the government vowed tighter controls at land borders. The National Health Commission said on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of Sunday, compared with 47 the day before. Imported cases and asymptomatic patients, who show no symptoms but can still pass the virus on, have become China's chief concern after draconian containment measures succeeded in slashing the overall infection rate.


Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understatedPublic health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said.There are many reasons why the numbers are underreported. Strict criteria in the beginning of the outbreak kept many people from getting tested for coronavirus, and it's still difficult to get tested in some areas, for example. There's also the matter of false negatives, and not all medical examiners have tests or believe they should conduct postmortem testing, even on people who died at home or in nursing homes where there were outbreaks. Experts also believe some February and early March deaths that were attributed to influenza or pneumonia were likely due to coronavirus.The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths. The Post, other media outlets, and university researchers update their numbers more frequently, with the Post reporting on Sunday night that 9,633 people have died from coronavirus in the U.S., and at least 337,000 cases have been confirmed.More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers

Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakersThe man attacked local officials with a scythe after they told him to wear a face mask, according to a police report.


Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.

Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon."We are suffering very much. It's a devastating pain," Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said on Sunday.


Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump

Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump(Bloomberg) -- Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is set to declare a state of emergency, media reports said, after coronavirus cases in Tokyo jumped over the weekend to top 1,000, raising worries of a more explosive surge.After last week saying the situation didn’t yet call for such a move, Abe changed course and will announce the plan as soon as Monday, media reports said. The formal declaration for the Tokyo area will be coming as early as Tuesday, the Yomiuri newspaper reported without attribution. The declaration could also cover the surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Saitama and Kanagawa, as well as Osaka, and be given a time limit of six months, broadcaster TBS said, citing sources close to the matter.The process for making the declaration picked up pace Monday, with Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura, who is handling the virus response, meeting Abe alongside the government’s top expert adviser on the pandemic. The premier may unveil his plan at a meeting of his virus task force after 6 p.m.The declaration could go into effect as Japan’s biggest-ever stimulus package worth 60 trillion yen ($550 billion) is set to be announced Tuesday.No LockdownThe state of emergency, which comes after pressure from local governors and the medical community, doesn’t enable a European-style lockdown.Declaring a state of emergency hands powers to local governments, including to urge residents to stay at home for a certain span of time during the emergency period. By contrast with some other countries though, there is no legal power to enforce such requests due to civil liberties protections in Japanese law.Abe’s government saw its approval rating slip to its lowest since October 2018 in a poll from broadcaster JNN released Monday with a majority of respondents faulting the way the government has managed the virus crisis. The poll taken April 4-5 showed that about 80% of respondents said the declaration should be made.The governors of Tokyo and Osaka have been pushing for the declaration as the recent spike in cases sparked concerns Japan is headed for a crisis on the levels seen in the U.S. and several countries in Europe.Japan was one of the first countries outside of the original epicenter in neighboring China to confirm a coronavirus infection and it has fared better than most, with about 3,650 reported cases as of Monday -- a jump from less than 500 just a month ago. That’s the lowest tally of any Group of Seven country, although Japan might be finding fewer mild cases because it has conducted a relatively small number of tests.Last week, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo advised American citizens who live in the U.S. but are currently in Japan to return home, “unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.” It added Japan’s low testing rate makes it hard to accurately assess the prevalence of the virus. The Japan Medical Association warned last week that the jump in cases in the nation’s most populous cities is putting more pressure on medical resources and that the government should declare a state of emergency.Tokyo reported 143 new coronavirus infections on Sunday, the largest number in a single day. It marked the second straight day the city’s daily infection tally exceeded 100.Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is already pressing residents to avoid unnecessary outings, and television showed many of the capital’s main shopping areas almost deserted over the weekend. The Tokyo local government is set to begin leasing hotels this week to accommodate mild cases, making room in its hospitals for the seriously ill.(Updates with media reports on area, time period)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled"If I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," said Grace Mitchell.


Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemic

Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemicRoughly 40 million black Americans are deciding whether to put their faith in government and the medical community during the coronavirus pandemic. Historic failures in government responses to disasters and emergencies, medical abuse, neglect and exploitation have jaded generations of black people into a distrust of some public institutions.


Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdown

Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdownFunke Akindele recently appeared in a public health video to raise awareness about coronavirus.


Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online convention

Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online conventionJoe Biden said Sunday that the Democratic National Convention, already delayed until August because of the coronavirus, may need to take place online as the pandemic continues to reshape the race for the White House. The party "may have to do a virtual convention,” the former vice president said. Biden has a commanding lead in the number of delegates needed to secure his party's presidential nomination at a convention in Milwaukee, originally scheduled for mid-July.


Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’

Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’Iranian health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur on Sunday criticized Chinese government statistics on the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, appearing to blame those statistics for other countries' slow response to the emerging pandemic."It seems statistics from China [were] a bitter joke, because many in the world thought this is just like influenza, with fewer deaths," Jahanpur said during a video conference in remarks translated by Radio Farda. "This [impression] were based on reports from China and now it seems China made a bitter joke with the rest of the world."Jahanpur added, "If in China they say an epidemic was controlled in two months, one should really think about it."The remarks caused a spat with Chinese officials, with China's ambassador to Iran saying the country should " show respect to the truths and great efforts of the people of China." Jahanpur took to Twitter to criticize Chinese statistics yet again, but subsequently offered praise of China, an ally of Iran."The support offered by China to the Iranian people in these trying times is unforgettable," Jahanpur wrote on Monday.While Iran has reported over 60,000 cases of coronavirus with more than 3,700 deaths as of Monday, U.S. officials believe the extent of the outbreak is much wider than the government has revealed. In late February, Iranian parliament members criticized their own government for concealing "horrific numbers" of deaths in the country.


Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official

Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: officialIran will never ask the United States for help in the fight against the new coronavirus, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has rejected offers from Washington for humanitarian assistance for Iran, the Middle Eastern country so far worst-affected by the coronavirus, with 3,739 deaths and 60,500 people infected according to the latest figures on Monday. "Iran has never asked and will not ask America to help Tehran in its fight against the outbreak ... But America should lift all its illegal unilateral sanctions on Iran," Mousavi said in a televised news conference.


Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve This

Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve ThisAs states around the U.S. scavenge for ventilators to treat the wave of critically ill coronavirus patients, doctors on the front lines are confronting not just the question of when they will get them, but when they should use them.The grim fact is that most people infected with COVID-19 who are sedated, intubated, and hooked up to a mechanical breathing machine will not survive. This is in part a function of just how sick they are when doctors finally resort to a ventilator, but also due in part to the damage ventilators cause to the lungs. The longer someone is on a ventilator, the lower the odds they will ever breathe again on their own.“It’s just a bridge to keep them going,” Marco Garrone, an emergency-medicine physician in Turin, Italy, told The Daily Beast. “It’s just a sort of last-ditch resort to buy time for them to heal... for the whole body to overcome the illness.”But unlike with some other respiratory diseases, there is no proven treatment for COVID-19. Doctors around the globe have reported survival numbers that show how difficult it is for an intubated patient to outrace the disease. Garrone and his colleagues say only 20 percent make it, while a London study found a slightly larger proportion.“These patients do extremely badly on mechanical vents,” Garrone said. At the same time, ventilators also represent the only hope for those whose oxygen levels continue to plunge—explaining why U.S. governors are so desperate to make sure they have enough.“You need ventilators, that’s for sure,” Garrone emphasized. “I agree 100 percent with what Gov. Cuomo said.”Trump Vows to Send Ventilators to Europe as U.S. Governors Plead for SuppliesThe challenge then is to find something less extreme than a ventilator to act as the bridge and buy patients the time they need to recover—a challenge that is all the more daunting given that doctors and researchers are still learning how the novel coronavirus behaves.“It is a brand-new disease,” Derek Angus, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a renowned authority on intensive care, told The Daily Beast. Before moving to a ventilator, Garrone often uses a mask to administer oxygen via continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP. He compared it to home CPAP machines used to keep open the airways of people with sleep apnea. “Exactly the same,” Garrone said. “Higher pressure.”He added, “I have a good number of people who did really well on CPAP. I’m not saying everybody fares well, [that] CPAP works with everyone. Start them on CPAP and try to keep them on CPAP as much as you can.”Another non-invasive option is a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers oxygen via a two-pronged tube fitted to the nose rather than via a mask as with CPAP. But both methods can potentially aerosolize virus particles, sending them into the air. That is not a threat to COVID-19 patients, but could constitute a considerable danger to those not infected with the disease, including health-care workers and first responders—especially those running short of personal protective equipment.In Kirkland, Washington, county health officials postulated that paramedics may have inadvertently furthered the spread of coronavirus when they employed CPAP machines to treat residents of the Life Care Center nursing home—where dozens eventually died.Angus said on a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) podcast last week that the jury is still out on whether the high-flow nasal cannula could pose a similar problem.“We have not worked out at this point exactly how safe that is,” he said.Further complicating the question of when to intubate is the deceptive and mercurial nature of COVID-19. A bad turn can come just as quickly as a new one.Greg Neyman, an emergency physician in New Jersey, has noted that COVID-19 patients can appear to be in little distress at oxygen levels that ordinarily would have people gasping for breath and maybe tearing off their air mask. Instead, COVID-19 patients can appear to be “just a little fluish.”“It’s something we’re not used to in emergency medicine and critical care,” Neyman told The Daily Beast.President Trump Insists New York Will Be ‘Fine,’ Won’t Need Extra VentilatorsThe coronavirus patient’s lungs continue to function mechanically. But even as they inhale and exhale, inflating and deflating their lungs, they can be hypoxic, or short of oxygen in the blood. The lungs may work, but the oxygen does not reach them.  And there is a concern that an exhausted and overwhelmed medical staff might fail to note ongoing labored breathing. “How safely can we use non-invasive ventilation?” Angus asked the JAMA podcast. “It would be terrible if [a patient] had acute respiratory failure without someone able to get to the bedside and intubate.”Because COVID-19 can worsen so precipitously, doctors may have only a small window in which to make the decision to intubate.When the time comes, Garrone asks the patient—who is generally still conscious and cognizant—for verbal consent before inducing a coma from which they have a painfully low chance of emerging.“I don’t think they are aware of how the odds are against them and it would be very harsh of us, almost cruel, to tell them,” Garrone told The Daily Beast. “Besides, when they are proposed with intubation there is really no other reasonable course of action left.”Doctors are trying to figure out new courses of action in real time, as their ICUs fill up and their ventilator supplies run low. Researchers are racing to analyze the outcomes to better inform the decision-making process.“We don’t know enough yet,” said Angus. “We want more data.”He offered a comparison of the fight we face with brand new COVID-19.“Trench warfare in the First World War,” he said.But in truth, the life-and-death decisions on the battlefield were simple compared to those faced by ICU doctors. Even when hospitals have enough ventilators.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'

Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'Aides have become 'increasingly worried' about prime minister Boris Johnson's health after he tested positive for the coronavirus.


What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?

What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to announce a state of emergency as soon as Tuesday in several parts of the country, including Tokyo, where coronavirus infections are spiking. The declaration is not nationwide. Abe said Monday it would cover Tokyo, as well as neighbouring Chiba, Kanagawa and Saitama, the western hub of Osaka and neighbouring Hyogo, as well as the southwestern region of Fukuoka.


Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'

Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued some dire warnings since the early days of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus, but on Sunday he indicated some steps taken by the U.S. federal government and states might be paying off -- both in terms of curbing the spread and preparing the health-care system for an onslaught of patients.New York City remains the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, and its hospitals are struggling. Gottlieb reiterated the predication made by numerous officials that the city, and New York state, are on the verge of peaking next week, which will undoubtedly stretch the health-care system thin. But he said he, ultimately, he thinks there will be enough ventilators for severe COVID-19 patients thanks to a historic effort to expand their supply, preventing New York from going past its tipping point.> The New York healthcare system "will be right on the brink" \- strained - "but won't go over" @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan . He adds, "I don't think they will run out of ventilators." pic.twitter.com/AhnAanf4rN> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020As for the rest of the country, Gottlieb believes mitigation efforts like social distancing are "clearly working," as case rates slow in northern states, though he's concerned the next set of hot spots will be in the South. > "Mitigation is clearly working," @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan, but notes that states in the Sunbelt - across the south - are going to be the next hotspots in the United States. pic.twitter.com/wD4q1Z5yUf> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judge

1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judgePatrick Jones "spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him," one of his former lawyers said.


Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby Princess

Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby PrincessPassengers from the Ruby Princess disembarked in Sydney without knowing the coronavirus was on board.


Puerto Rico discovers protective supply cache amid COVID-19
Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacy

Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacySince assuming office in January 2017, Mr. Trump has appointed 193 judges to the federal bench, a staggering figure with few recent precedents.


Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlook

Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlookGlobal benchmark oil prices traded as much as $3 a barrel lower as the market opened for Monday's trading session, reflecting fears of oversupply after Saudi Arabia and Russia postponed to Thursday a meeting about a potential pact to cut production. Late last week, prices had surged, with both U.S. and Brent contracts posting their largest weekly percentage gains on record due to hopes that OPEC and its allies would strike a global deal to cut crude supply worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus has cut demand and a month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia has left the market awash in crude.


During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health Workers

During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health WorkersAs hospitals across the country brace for an onslaught of coronavirus patients, doctors, nurses and other health care workers -- even in emerging hot spots -- are being furloughed, reassigned or told they must take pay cuts.The job cuts, which stretch from Massachusetts to Nevada, are a new and possibly urgent problem for a business-oriented health care system whose hospitals must earn revenue even in a national crisis. Hospitals large and small have canceled many elective services -- often under state government orders -- as they prepare for the virus, sending revenues plummeting.That has left trained health care workers sidelined, even in areas around Detroit and Washington, where infection rates are climbing, and even as hard-hit hospitals are pleading for help."I'm 46. I've never been on unemployment in my life," said Casey Cox, who three weeks ago worked two jobs, one conducting sleep research at the University of Michigan and another as a technician at the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Hospital near Ann Arbor, Michigan. Within a week, he had lost both.Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York has begged doctors and other medical workers from around the country to come to the city to help in areas where the coronavirus is overwhelming hospitals."Unless there is a national effort to enlist doctors, nurses, hospital workers of all kinds and get them where they are needed most in the country in time, I don't see, honestly, how we're going to have the professionals we need to get through this crisis," de Blasio said Friday morning on MSNBC.And the Department of Veterans Affairs is scrambling to hire health care workers for its government-run hospitals, especially in hard-hit New Orleans and Detroit, where many staff members have fallen ill. The department moved to get a federal waiver to hire retired medical workers to beef up staff levels.But even as some hospitals are straining to handle the influx of coronavirus patients, empty hospital beds elsewhere carry their own burden."We're in trouble," said Gene Morreale, the chief executive of Oneida Health Hospital in upstate New York, which has not yet seen a surge in coronavirus patients.Governors in dozens of states have delivered executive orders or guidelines directing hospitals to stop nonurgent procedures and surgeries to various degrees. Last month, the U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome M. Adams, also implored hospitals to halt elective procedures.That has left many health systems struggling to survive.Next week, Morreale said, Oneida will announce that it is putting 25% to 30% of its employees on involuntary furlough. They will have access to their health insurance through June. Physicians and senior staff at the hospital have taken a 20% pay cut."We've been here 121 years, and I'm hoping we're still there on the other side of this," Morreale said.Appalachian Regional Healthcare, a 13-hospital system in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, has seen a 30% decrease in its overall business because of a decline in patient volume and services related to the pandemic. Last week, the hospital system announced it would furlough about 8% of its workforce -- around 500 employees.Hospital executives across the country are cutting pay while also trying to repurpose employees for other jobs.At Intermountain Healthcare, which operates 215 clinics and 24 hospitals in Utah, Idaho and Nevada, about 600 of the 2,600 physicians, physicians assistants and registered nurses who are compensated based on volume will see their pay dip by about 15%, said Daron Cowley, a company spokesman.Those reductions are tied to the drop in procedures, which has fallen significantly for some specialties, he said. The organization is working to preserve employment as much as possible, in part by trying to deploy 3,000 staff members into new roles."You have an endoscopy tech right now that may be deployed to be at hospital entrances" where they would take the temperatures of people coming in, Cowley explained.In Boston, a spokesman for Partners HealthCare, with 12 hospitals, including Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's, said staff members whose work has decreased are being deployed to other areas or will be paid for up to eight weeks if no work is available.But redeployment is not always an option. Janet Conway, a spokeswoman for Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said many of the company's operating room nurses trained in specialized procedures have been furloughed because their training did not translate to other roles."Those OR nurses, many have never worked as a floor nurse," she said.Conway said nearly 300 furloughed staff members have the option to use their paid time off, but beyond that, the furlough would be unpaid. Most employees are afforded 25 days per year.Some furloughed hospital workers are likely to be asked to return as the number of coronavirus cases rise in their communities. But the unpredictable virus has offered little clarity and left hospitals, like much of the economy, in a free fall.Many health systems are making direct cuts to their payrolls, eliminating or shrinking performance bonuses and prorating paychecks to mirror reduced workload until operations stabilize.Scott Weavil, a lawyer in California who counsels physicians and other health care workers on employment contracts, said he was hearing from doctors across the country who were being asked to take pay cuts of 20% to 70%.The requests are coming from hospital administrators or private physician groups hired by the hospitals, he said, and are essentially new contracts that doctors are being asked to sign.Many of the contracts do not say when the cuts might end, and are mostly affecting doctors who are not treating coronavirus patients on the front lines, such as urologists, rheumatologists, bariatric surgeons, obstetricians and gynecologists.Such doctors are still being asked to work -- often in a decreased capacity -- yet may be risking their health going into hospitals and clinics."It's just not sitting well," Weavil said, noting that he tells doctors they unfortunately have few options if they want to work for their institution long term."If you fight this pay cut, administration could write your name down and remember that forever," he said he tells them.In other cases, physicians are continuing to find opportunities to practice in a more limited capacity, like telemedicine appointments. But that has not eliminated steep pay cuts."Physicians are only paid in our clinic based on their productivity in the work they do," said Dr. Pam Cutler, the president of Western Montana Clinic in Missoula. "So they're automatically taking a very significant -- usually greater than 50% or 25% -- pay cut just because they don't have any work."In some areas, layoffs have left behind health care workers who worry that they will not be able to find new roles or redeploy their skills.Cox in Michigan said he was briefly reassigned at his hospital, helping screen and process patients coming in with coronavirus symptoms, but eventually the people seeking reassignments outgrew the number of roles.He also expressed concern that inevitable changes in the health care industry after the pandemic -- paired with the possibility of a lengthy period of unemployment -- could make it difficult to get his job back."I'm just concerned that the job I got laid off from may not be there when this is over," Cox said. "The longer you're away, the more you worry, 'Am I going to be able to come back?' So there's a lot of anxiety about it."Even as many of the largest hospital networks grapple with sudden financial uncertainty, much smaller practices and clinics face a more immediate threat.According to a statistical model produced by HealthLandscape and the American Academy of Family Physicians, by the end of April, nearly 20,000 family physicians could be fully out of work, underemployed or reassigned elsewhere, particularly as cities like New York consider large-scale, emergency reassignments of physicians."Many of these smaller practices were living on a financial edge to start with, so they're not entering into this in a good position at all," said Dr. Gary Price, the president of the Physicians Foundation. "Their margins are narrower, their patients don't want to come in, and many of them shouldn't anyway, so their cash flow has been severely impacted and their overhead really hasn't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdownTrump repeated a favorite refrain of some conservatives, who have said that the coronavirus “cure”—that is, a nationwide shutdown—cannot be worse than the disease itself.


Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

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Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-ed

Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-edTweed Roosevelt, in a New York Times op-ed, said his great-grandfather would have done the same thing as Crozier.


Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital

Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital“We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,” the queen said, echoing a World War II-era song.


3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.

3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.Lockdown measures in Italy, Spain and France appear to be bearing fruit after three weeks, with daily death tolls beginning to decline.


'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.

'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.A doctor treating COVID-19 patients sits down with her husband to make a will.


U.K. Virus Deaths Slow as Government Mulls Tighter Lockdown
Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisis

Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisisCoronavirus crisis proves communism is still a grave threat to the entire world. If Beijing had just been honest, the pandemic could be preventable.


Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugees

Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugeesMalaysian authorities said they have arrested a boatload of 202 people believed to be minority Muslim Rohingya refugees after their boat was found adrift Sunday morning near the northern resort island of Langkawi. A Northern District maritime official, Capt. Zulinda Ramly, said the refugees included 152 men, 45 women and five children. Zulinda said maritime officials have taken precautionary measures to prevent any possible transmission of the COVID-19 virus while handling the group.


Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?

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Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDP

Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDPJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged on Monday to roll out an unprecedented economic stimulus package, equal to 20% of economic output, as his government vowed to take "all steps" to battle deepening fallout from the coronavirus. The package, to be confirmed by the cabinet on Tuesday, will total 108 trillion yen ($989 billion), far exceeding one compiled in the wake of the 2009 financial crisis totalling 56 trillion yen in size, with fiscal spending of 15 trillion yen. "We decided to carry out an unprecedentedly massive scale of economic package worth 108 trillion yen, or 20% of GDP, following the immense damage to the economy from the novel coronavirus," Abe told reporters after a meeting with senior ruling party lawmakers.


Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19

Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19The Bronx Zoo in New York says this case of human-to-animal transmission appears to be unique.


U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come

U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come"It's going to be the hardest moment for many Americans in their entire lives," Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on MSNBC's Meet the Press.


An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears

An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fearsExperts predicted the stresses of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns could lead to an uptick in domestic violence.


Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsens

Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsensWith most elective surgeries cancelled during the pandemic, hospitals experiencing revenue loss are furloughing staff members in the middle of the pandemic


‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic Drowning

‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic DrowningMaeve Kennedy Townsend McKean’s husband has posted a heartbreaking tribute to his wife—the granddaughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy—and the couple’s child, who went missing in the Chesapeake Bay Thursday afternoon.The Kennedy family announced Friday that the Coast Guard suspended the rescue effort for McKean, 40, and son Gideon, 8, who disappeared after paddling a canoe out into the bay. The effort to recover their remains is ongoing.“The search that began yesterday afternoon went on throughout the night and continued all day today,” McKean’s husband, David McKean, wrote in a Facebook post late Friday. “It is now dark again. It has been more than 24 hours, and the chances they have survived are impossibly small. It is clear that Maeve and Gideon have passed away.”The family had been self-quarantining from the novel coronavirus in a house on the bay owned by McKean’s mother, former Maryland Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, according to her husband’s post. The largely empty house provided them with more space to ride out the pandemic than their D.C. home, he said.McKean and her son were playing on a beach in a small, shallow cove behind the house at around 4 p.m. when one of them accidentally kicked a ball into the water. The two attempted to retrieve the ball by paddling a canoe into the protected cove, but ended up in the open bay where strong winds during the day had whipped up vicious currents.“The cove is protected, with much calmer wind and water than in the greater Chesapeake,” David McKean wrote. “They got into a canoe, intending simply to retrieve the ball, and somehow got pushed by wind or tide into the open bay.”About 30 minutes later, an onlooker called emergency services to report seeing the pair struggling to paddle to the shore. That was the last anyone saw of them. The Coast Guard recovered their capsized canoe miles away from the beach at 7 p.m. Friday.David McKean wrote tenderly of his late son, recalling his love of sports and strong morals.“He was deeply compassionate, declining to sing children’s songs if they contained a hint of animals or people being treated cruelly,” he wrote. “And he was brave, leading his friends in games, standing up to people who he thought were wrong (including his parents), and relishing opportunities to go on adventures with friends, even those he’d just met.”“I used to marvel at him as a toddler and worry that he was too perfect to exist in this world,” he added. “It seems to me now that he was.”His wife, McKean wrote, was “magical,” with “endless energy” and a laugh you could hear a block away.“Maeve turned 40 in November, and she was my everything,” he wrote. “She was my best friend and my soulmate. I have already thought many times over today that I need to remember to tell Maeve about something that’s happening. I am terrified by the idea that this will fade over time.”The couple met while working for Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and were married in 2003. Maeve served in the Peace Corp, with the State Department’s global AIDS program, and in the Obama administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, before signing on as executive director of the Georgetown University Global Health Initiative.“Maeve was vivid,” her mother, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, said in a statement Friday night. “You always knew when she was in a room. Her laughter was loud, unabashed and infectious.” McKean’s cousin, Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), posted on Twitter: “We love you Maeve. We love you Gideon. Our family has lost two of the brightest lights.”McKean is survived by her 7-year-old daughter, Gabriella, and 2-year-old son, Toby. “I know soon he will start to ask for Maeve and Gideon,” her husband wrote of Toby. “It breaks my heart that he will not get to have them as a mother and brother.”In his Facebook post, David McKean asked friends and family to share photos of his late wife and son.“As Gabriella and Toby lay sleeping next to me last night, I promised them that I would do my best to be the parent that Maeve was, and to be the person that Gideon clearly would have grown up to be,” he wrote. “Part of that is keeping their memories alive.”The Kennedy family has endured an extraordinary amount of tragedy over several generations, from the high-profile assassinations of McKean’s grandfather and great-uncle to the fatal plane crash that killed John F. Kennedy Jr., to the heart attack that killed Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s niece, Kara, in 2011 and the death by suicide of his ex-wife, Mary, in 2012.Just last year, McKean’s cousin, Saoirse Roisin Kennedy Hill, died of an accidental drug overdose at the Kennedy family compound in Cape Cod.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers

Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippersThe largest maritime operation ever undertaken in Sydney Harbour was completed on Sunday with the successful restocking and refuelling of five cruise ships, Australian police said. It was part of government efforts since mid-March to force vessels to leave the country's waters to prevent any further spread of the coronavirus in Australia. Cruise ship guests have so far accounted for almost 10 percent of Australia's more than 5,500 infections.


Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.


Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirusJust a little over a month after saying there was no need for the community at large to wear masks in public, the CDC has changed its mind, recommending that all Americans should wear some sort of face covering when venturing outside.


Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly

Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly“As an Inspector General, I was legally obligated to ensure that whistleblowers had an effective and authorized means to disclose urgent matter.”


Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price war

Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price warSaudi Arabia is taking unprecedented action in delaying the release of its international crude selling prices by five days, a senior Saudi source familiar with the matter said on Sunday, as the kingdom and other major producers seek to halt the free-fall in worldwide crude prices. A month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic, has cut the price of crude to $34 a barrel from $65.


Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar

Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soarThe measures aim to avert a major outbreak in its major cities but fall short of a lockdown.


Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank

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A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up there

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Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month

Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month(Bloomberg) -- The deadly coronavirus may infect as many as 95,000 people in Indonesia by next month before easing, a minister said, as authorities ordered people to wear face masks to contain the pandemic.The dire forecast, which came as the country reported its biggest daily spike in confirmed cases, is based on a projection by the nation’s intelligence agency, University of Indonesia and Bandung Institute of Technology, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told lawmakers in Jakarta. The estimate was discussed at a cabinet meeting held by President Joko Widodo earlier on Monday, she said.Indonesia has seen a surge in infections in recent weeks after reporting its first cases only in early March. While the death toll from the pandemic at 209 is the highest in Asia after China, confirmed cases at 2,491 in a country of almost 270 million people is fewer than those reported in smaller countries such as Malaysia and the Philippines. Authorities reported 218 new Covid-19 cases on Monday. “The situation is very dynamic,” Indrawati said. “The government continues to monitor and take more steps as estimates show that the cases may peak in April and May.”Jokowi, as Widodo is known, has declared a national health emergency and ordered large scale social distancing to contain the spread of the virus that has infected almost 1.3 million people worldwide. On Monday, the president ordered authorities to ensure availability of face masks for every household as he appealed to citizens to cover their faces to contain the pandemic.The world’s fourth-most populous nation, along with India and the Philippines, could soon become the next Covid-19 hot spots given their large populations, weak health care infrastructure and social security net, according to Nomura Holdings Inc.Mortality RateThe highest mortality rate in Asia may signal the actual number of infections may be much higher than reported in Indonesia, reflecting a lack of Covid-19 testing capacity, Nomura said in a report last week. The country may eventually be forced to implement a complete lockdown in April and possibly for an extended period, Nomura said.The president has rejected calls to lock down cities and regions to fight the virus, saying such harsh steps would hurt the poor the most. But the surge in cases has overwhelmed the country’s health care system, with authorities struggling to procure enough personal protection equipment, hazmat suits and ventilators for medical workers.Some local administrations have sought permission to impose large scale social distancing measures under a new rule issued by the Health Ministry, Doni Monardo, chief of the government’s task force on coronavirus said Monday. The steps will allow police and other law enforcement agencies to take “measurable actions”, according to officials.Indonesia Slashes Growth Forecast by More Than Half on Virus The police will step up a crackdown on gathering of people across the archipelago to aid the government efforts to break the virus chain, national police spokesman Argo Yuwono said in a televised briefing Monday. Law enforcement agencies have also investigated more than a dozen cases of hoarding of food, masks and other essential supplies and price gouging, he said.Jokowi said a plan to release prisoners from the nation’s crowded jails should be limited to those serving terms for general crimes and not those convicted for corruption and other serious offenses. The president also ordered speedier reallocation of budget to tackle the health and economic impact of the pandemic, his office said in a statement.(Updates with latest coronavirus data in third paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Washington state returns ventilators for use in New York

Washington state returns ventilators for use in New YorkWashington Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that the state will return more than 400 ventilators of the 500 it has received from the federal government so they can go to New York and other states hit harder by the coronavirus. The Democratic governor said Sunday that his statewide stay-at-home order and weeks of social distancing have led to slower rates of infections and deaths in Washington. Washington state has 7,666 confirmed cases of the virus and 322 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday afternoon.


US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospital

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'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisis

'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisisQueen Elizabeth II delivered a brief speech on Sunday during the growing coronavirus crisis.


Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus

Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not CoronavirusThe idea that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks—especially one who’s been rewarded for bad behavior—is particularly poignant when we consider President Trump’s firing Friday of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the Intelligence Community. Trump has a track record of firing and retaliating against officials who don’t blindly follow his orders and mimic his mood swings, no matter how unethical, illegal, dangerous, or irresponsible.At the same time, Trump has a track record of decimating our intelligence agencies. His history of insulting the intelligence community, cherry-picking intelligence to suit his personal narratives, prioritizing loyalty over experience, and rooting out anyone who speaks truth (a core mission of the intelligence community) that he doesn’t like have been the key themes underlining his relationship with the intelligence community.Plus, Trump has never supported oversight, unless of course it’s focused on Democrats. The impetus for Atkinson’s firing—namely his work to fulfill his statutory obligations to pass on what he judged to be an urgent and credible whistleblower complaint about the president’s call with Ukrainian President Zelensky—didn’t jibe with Trump’s personal desire to avoid oversight. Team Trump Stirs Up Completely Bogus Claim About WhistleblowerHis political cronies, House Republicans on the intelligence community, even started investigating Atkinson. The inspector general’s job is largely to detect fraud, waste, and mismanagement, not to be complicit in it. The IC IG’s mandate is to do so with integrity, professionalism, and independence. Atkinson fulfilled those responsibilities, and he was fired for doing so.But, Trump has largely escaped paying any price for his actions. The Republican Party for the most part has stayed silent about his degradation of intelligence and manipulation of oversight to shield himself.While Atkinson’s firing comes as no surprise in light of the president’s habitual misuse and abuse of the intelligence community, coupled with his disdain for oversight more broadly, it will have costs for U.S. national security today, tomorrow, and further down the road.The timing of Atkinson’s removal could not be worse. Trump’s decision to fire Atkinson in the midst of an unprecedented national crisis signals what his priorities are: his personal insecurity trumps national security. His need to settle a perceived vendetta and to remove someone who he perceives to have wronged him is putting additional pressure on an already strained IC. This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for the US government. The coronavirus crisis has introduced myriad new threats for the IC to analyze while concurrently straining resources as the workforce tries to protect itself through measures like social distancing, working from home, and shift work. This is not the time when the intelligence community needs any fewer competent officials on board. Nor is it the time to put more pressure on intelligence officials by introducing an unnecessary transition in IG leadership. That is a drain of resources as staff scramble to brief up the new acting IG. It’s undoubtedly a further blow to morale.And, Trump didn’t just fire Atkinson and allow him to serve out his statutorily outlined 30-day transition period. Atkinson reportedly didn’t know about his removal in advance and has now been placed on administration leave. The relevant statute requires that both intelligence committees be notified 30 days before the inspector general can be dismissed. By putting Atkinson on leave and not giving him the time to brief up his successor and transition his work there’s a real chance that someone drops the ball, somewhere, on critical work. But, then again, maybe that’s what the President is hoping for - that oversight is damaged. This may be an operational bonus for POTUS.An actual leader—a responsible president—would minimize pressure on the IC right now because they have critical national security work to do and cycling out one of the president’s perceived enemies doesn’t fall within that necessary for national security to do list. Atkinson’s removal is about retribution but it’s also about sending a message to the intel community at large and to everyone considering throwing their name in the mix as a nominee to fill Atkinson’s shoes. Trump’s letter to Congress regarding Atkinson’s firing noted that Atkinson no longer has his “fullest confidence.” However, there is no indication that Atkinson did not perform his job. In fact, the chairman of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency—an independent executive branch agency—and the IG of the Justice Department reacted to Atkinson’s removal in saying that “Inspector General Atkinson is known throughout the Inspector General community for his integrity, professionalism, and commitment to the rule of law and independent oversight.” Atkinson lost Trump’s confidence because he wouldn’t become a partisan tool when both as an IG and as a member of the intelligence community, objective, non-partisan work is part of the job description. Because of Trump’s actions, however, anyone considering taking the job will have to be willing not to uphold the law but to bend it to please POTUS.The broader and longer-term impact on recruitment and retention in the IC is that Trump has changed the cost benefit analysis associated with serving in the intelligence community right now. In the short term, at least, the IG’s office is hamstrung in its ability to fully function at a time when it is sorely needed for whistleblowers, for efficiency, and for oversight of critical intelligence-related issues impacting our national security, including coronavirus.Trump’s narcissism—his prioritization of self over country—is on full display. He’s never been known for his intelligence, but this latest move in a litany of dangerous behavior is going to cost us.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land borders

China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land bordersMainland China reported 39 new coronavirus cases as of Sunday, up from 30 a day earlier, and the number of asymptomatic cases also surged as the government vowed tighter controls at land borders. The National Health Commission said on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of Sunday, compared with 47 the day before. Imported cases and asymptomatic patients, who show no symptoms but can still pass the virus on, have become China's chief concern after draconian containment measures succeeded in slashing the overall infection rate.


Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understatedPublic health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said.There are many reasons why the numbers are underreported. Strict criteria in the beginning of the outbreak kept many people from getting tested for coronavirus, and it's still difficult to get tested in some areas, for example. There's also the matter of false negatives, and not all medical examiners have tests or believe they should conduct postmortem testing, even on people who died at home or in nursing homes where there were outbreaks. Experts also believe some February and early March deaths that were attributed to influenza or pneumonia were likely due to coronavirus.The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths. The Post, other media outlets, and university researchers update their numbers more frequently, with the Post reporting on Sunday night that 9,633 people have died from coronavirus in the U.S., and at least 337,000 cases have been confirmed.More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers

Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakersThe man attacked local officials with a scythe after they told him to wear a face mask, according to a police report.


Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.

Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon."We are suffering very much. It's a devastating pain," Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said on Sunday.


Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump

Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump(Bloomberg) -- Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is set to declare a state of emergency, media reports said, after coronavirus cases in Tokyo jumped over the weekend to top 1,000, raising worries of a more explosive surge.After last week saying the situation didn’t yet call for such a move, Abe changed course and will announce the plan as soon as Monday, media reports said. The formal declaration for the Tokyo area will be coming as early as Tuesday, the Yomiuri newspaper reported without attribution. The declaration could also cover the surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Saitama and Kanagawa, as well as Osaka, and be given a time limit of six months, broadcaster TBS said, citing sources close to the matter.The process for making the declaration picked up pace Monday, with Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura, who is handling the virus response, meeting Abe alongside the government’s top expert adviser on the pandemic. The premier may unveil his plan at a meeting of his virus task force after 6 p.m.The declaration could go into effect as Japan’s biggest-ever stimulus package worth 60 trillion yen ($550 billion) is set to be announced Tuesday.No LockdownThe state of emergency, which comes after pressure from local governors and the medical community, doesn’t enable a European-style lockdown.Declaring a state of emergency hands powers to local governments, including to urge residents to stay at home for a certain span of time during the emergency period. By contrast with some other countries though, there is no legal power to enforce such requests due to civil liberties protections in Japanese law.Abe’s government saw its approval rating slip to its lowest since October 2018 in a poll from broadcaster JNN released Monday with a majority of respondents faulting the way the government has managed the virus crisis. The poll taken April 4-5 showed that about 80% of respondents said the declaration should be made.The governors of Tokyo and Osaka have been pushing for the declaration as the recent spike in cases sparked concerns Japan is headed for a crisis on the levels seen in the U.S. and several countries in Europe.Japan was one of the first countries outside of the original epicenter in neighboring China to confirm a coronavirus infection and it has fared better than most, with about 3,650 reported cases as of Monday -- a jump from less than 500 just a month ago. That’s the lowest tally of any Group of Seven country, although Japan might be finding fewer mild cases because it has conducted a relatively small number of tests.Last week, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo advised American citizens who live in the U.S. but are currently in Japan to return home, “unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.” It added Japan’s low testing rate makes it hard to accurately assess the prevalence of the virus. The Japan Medical Association warned last week that the jump in cases in the nation’s most populous cities is putting more pressure on medical resources and that the government should declare a state of emergency.Tokyo reported 143 new coronavirus infections on Sunday, the largest number in a single day. It marked the second straight day the city’s daily infection tally exceeded 100.Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is already pressing residents to avoid unnecessary outings, and television showed many of the capital’s main shopping areas almost deserted over the weekend. The Tokyo local government is set to begin leasing hotels this week to accommodate mild cases, making room in its hospitals for the seriously ill.(Updates with media reports on area, time period)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled"If I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," said Grace Mitchell.


Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemic

Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemicRoughly 40 million black Americans are deciding whether to put their faith in government and the medical community during the coronavirus pandemic. Historic failures in government responses to disasters and emergencies, medical abuse, neglect and exploitation have jaded generations of black people into a distrust of some public institutions.


Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdown

Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdownFunke Akindele recently appeared in a public health video to raise awareness about coronavirus.


Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online convention

Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online conventionJoe Biden said Sunday that the Democratic National Convention, already delayed until August because of the coronavirus, may need to take place online as the pandemic continues to reshape the race for the White House. The party "may have to do a virtual convention,” the former vice president said. Biden has a commanding lead in the number of delegates needed to secure his party's presidential nomination at a convention in Milwaukee, originally scheduled for mid-July.


Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’

Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’Iranian health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur on Sunday criticized Chinese government statistics on the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, appearing to blame those statistics for other countries' slow response to the emerging pandemic."It seems statistics from China [were] a bitter joke, because many in the world thought this is just like influenza, with fewer deaths," Jahanpur said during a video conference in remarks translated by Radio Farda. "This [impression] were based on reports from China and now it seems China made a bitter joke with the rest of the world."Jahanpur added, "If in China they say an epidemic was controlled in two months, one should really think about it."The remarks caused a spat with Chinese officials, with China's ambassador to Iran saying the country should " show respect to the truths and great efforts of the people of China." Jahanpur took to Twitter to criticize Chinese statistics yet again, but subsequently offered praise of China, an ally of Iran."The support offered by China to the Iranian people in these trying times is unforgettable," Jahanpur wrote on Monday.While Iran has reported over 60,000 cases of coronavirus with more than 3,700 deaths as of Monday, U.S. officials believe the extent of the outbreak is much wider than the government has revealed. In late February, Iranian parliament members criticized their own government for concealing "horrific numbers" of deaths in the country.


Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official

Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: officialIran will never ask the United States for help in the fight against the new coronavirus, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has rejected offers from Washington for humanitarian assistance for Iran, the Middle Eastern country so far worst-affected by the coronavirus, with 3,739 deaths and 60,500 people infected according to the latest figures on Monday. "Iran has never asked and will not ask America to help Tehran in its fight against the outbreak ... But America should lift all its illegal unilateral sanctions on Iran," Mousavi said in a televised news conference.


Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve This

Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve ThisAs states around the U.S. scavenge for ventilators to treat the wave of critically ill coronavirus patients, doctors on the front lines are confronting not just the question of when they will get them, but when they should use them.The grim fact is that most people infected with COVID-19 who are sedated, intubated, and hooked up to a mechanical breathing machine will not survive. This is in part a function of just how sick they are when doctors finally resort to a ventilator, but also due in part to the damage ventilators cause to the lungs. The longer someone is on a ventilator, the lower the odds they will ever breathe again on their own.“It’s just a bridge to keep them going,” Marco Garrone, an emergency-medicine physician in Turin, Italy, told The Daily Beast. “It’s just a sort of last-ditch resort to buy time for them to heal... for the whole body to overcome the illness.”But unlike with some other respiratory diseases, there is no proven treatment for COVID-19. Doctors around the globe have reported survival numbers that show how difficult it is for an intubated patient to outrace the disease. Garrone and his colleagues say only 20 percent make it, while a London study found a slightly larger proportion.“These patients do extremely badly on mechanical vents,” Garrone said. At the same time, ventilators also represent the only hope for those whose oxygen levels continue to plunge—explaining why U.S. governors are so desperate to make sure they have enough.“You need ventilators, that’s for sure,” Garrone emphasized. “I agree 100 percent with what Gov. Cuomo said.”Trump Vows to Send Ventilators to Europe as U.S. Governors Plead for SuppliesThe challenge then is to find something less extreme than a ventilator to act as the bridge and buy patients the time they need to recover—a challenge that is all the more daunting given that doctors and researchers are still learning how the novel coronavirus behaves.“It is a brand-new disease,” Derek Angus, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a renowned authority on intensive care, told The Daily Beast. Before moving to a ventilator, Garrone often uses a mask to administer oxygen via continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP. He compared it to home CPAP machines used to keep open the airways of people with sleep apnea. “Exactly the same,” Garrone said. “Higher pressure.”He added, “I have a good number of people who did really well on CPAP. I’m not saying everybody fares well, [that] CPAP works with everyone. Start them on CPAP and try to keep them on CPAP as much as you can.”Another non-invasive option is a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers oxygen via a two-pronged tube fitted to the nose rather than via a mask as with CPAP. But both methods can potentially aerosolize virus particles, sending them into the air. That is not a threat to COVID-19 patients, but could constitute a considerable danger to those not infected with the disease, including health-care workers and first responders—especially those running short of personal protective equipment.In Kirkland, Washington, county health officials postulated that paramedics may have inadvertently furthered the spread of coronavirus when they employed CPAP machines to treat residents of the Life Care Center nursing home—where dozens eventually died.Angus said on a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) podcast last week that the jury is still out on whether the high-flow nasal cannula could pose a similar problem.“We have not worked out at this point exactly how safe that is,” he said.Further complicating the question of when to intubate is the deceptive and mercurial nature of COVID-19. A bad turn can come just as quickly as a new one.Greg Neyman, an emergency physician in New Jersey, has noted that COVID-19 patients can appear to be in little distress at oxygen levels that ordinarily would have people gasping for breath and maybe tearing off their air mask. Instead, COVID-19 patients can appear to be “just a little fluish.”“It’s something we’re not used to in emergency medicine and critical care,” Neyman told The Daily Beast.President Trump Insists New York Will Be ‘Fine,’ Won’t Need Extra VentilatorsThe coronavirus patient’s lungs continue to function mechanically. But even as they inhale and exhale, inflating and deflating their lungs, they can be hypoxic, or short of oxygen in the blood. The lungs may work, but the oxygen does not reach them.  And there is a concern that an exhausted and overwhelmed medical staff might fail to note ongoing labored breathing. “How safely can we use non-invasive ventilation?” Angus asked the JAMA podcast. “It would be terrible if [a patient] had acute respiratory failure without someone able to get to the bedside and intubate.”Because COVID-19 can worsen so precipitously, doctors may have only a small window in which to make the decision to intubate.When the time comes, Garrone asks the patient—who is generally still conscious and cognizant—for verbal consent before inducing a coma from which they have a painfully low chance of emerging.“I don’t think they are aware of how the odds are against them and it would be very harsh of us, almost cruel, to tell them,” Garrone told The Daily Beast. “Besides, when they are proposed with intubation there is really no other reasonable course of action left.”Doctors are trying to figure out new courses of action in real time, as their ICUs fill up and their ventilator supplies run low. Researchers are racing to analyze the outcomes to better inform the decision-making process.“We don’t know enough yet,” said Angus. “We want more data.”He offered a comparison of the fight we face with brand new COVID-19.“Trench warfare in the First World War,” he said.But in truth, the life-and-death decisions on the battlefield were simple compared to those faced by ICU doctors. Even when hospitals have enough ventilators.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'

Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'Aides have become 'increasingly worried' about prime minister Boris Johnson's health after he tested positive for the coronavirus.


What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?

What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to announce a state of emergency as soon as Tuesday in several parts of the country, including Tokyo, where coronavirus infections are spiking. The declaration is not nationwide. Abe said Monday it would cover Tokyo, as well as neighbouring Chiba, Kanagawa and Saitama, the western hub of Osaka and neighbouring Hyogo, as well as the southwestern region of Fukuoka.


Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'

Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued some dire warnings since the early days of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus, but on Sunday he indicated some steps taken by the U.S. federal government and states might be paying off -- both in terms of curbing the spread and preparing the health-care system for an onslaught of patients.New York City remains the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, and its hospitals are struggling. Gottlieb reiterated the predication made by numerous officials that the city, and New York state, are on the verge of peaking next week, which will undoubtedly stretch the health-care system thin. But he said he, ultimately, he thinks there will be enough ventilators for severe COVID-19 patients thanks to a historic effort to expand their supply, preventing New York from going past its tipping point.> The New York healthcare system "will be right on the brink" \- strained - "but won't go over" @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan . He adds, "I don't think they will run out of ventilators." pic.twitter.com/AhnAanf4rN> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020As for the rest of the country, Gottlieb believes mitigation efforts like social distancing are "clearly working," as case rates slow in northern states, though he's concerned the next set of hot spots will be in the South. > "Mitigation is clearly working," @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan, but notes that states in the Sunbelt - across the south - are going to be the next hotspots in the United States. pic.twitter.com/wD4q1Z5yUf> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judge

1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judgePatrick Jones "spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him," one of his former lawyers said.


Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby Princess

Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby PrincessPassengers from the Ruby Princess disembarked in Sydney without knowing the coronavirus was on board.


Puerto Rico discovers protective supply cache amid COVID-19
Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacy

Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacySince assuming office in January 2017, Mr. Trump has appointed 193 judges to the federal bench, a staggering figure with few recent precedents.


Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlook

Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlookGlobal benchmark oil prices traded as much as $3 a barrel lower as the market opened for Monday's trading session, reflecting fears of oversupply after Saudi Arabia and Russia postponed to Thursday a meeting about a potential pact to cut production. Late last week, prices had surged, with both U.S. and Brent contracts posting their largest weekly percentage gains on record due to hopes that OPEC and its allies would strike a global deal to cut crude supply worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus has cut demand and a month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia has left the market awash in crude.


During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health Workers

During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health WorkersAs hospitals across the country brace for an onslaught of coronavirus patients, doctors, nurses and other health care workers -- even in emerging hot spots -- are being furloughed, reassigned or told they must take pay cuts.The job cuts, which stretch from Massachusetts to Nevada, are a new and possibly urgent problem for a business-oriented health care system whose hospitals must earn revenue even in a national crisis. Hospitals large and small have canceled many elective services -- often under state government orders -- as they prepare for the virus, sending revenues plummeting.That has left trained health care workers sidelined, even in areas around Detroit and Washington, where infection rates are climbing, and even as hard-hit hospitals are pleading for help."I'm 46. I've never been on unemployment in my life," said Casey Cox, who three weeks ago worked two jobs, one conducting sleep research at the University of Michigan and another as a technician at the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Hospital near Ann Arbor, Michigan. Within a week, he had lost both.Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York has begged doctors and other medical workers from around the country to come to the city to help in areas where the coronavirus is overwhelming hospitals."Unless there is a national effort to enlist doctors, nurses, hospital workers of all kinds and get them where they are needed most in the country in time, I don't see, honestly, how we're going to have the professionals we need to get through this crisis," de Blasio said Friday morning on MSNBC.And the Department of Veterans Affairs is scrambling to hire health care workers for its government-run hospitals, especially in hard-hit New Orleans and Detroit, where many staff members have fallen ill. The department moved to get a federal waiver to hire retired medical workers to beef up staff levels.But even as some hospitals are straining to handle the influx of coronavirus patients, empty hospital beds elsewhere carry their own burden."We're in trouble," said Gene Morreale, the chief executive of Oneida Health Hospital in upstate New York, which has not yet seen a surge in coronavirus patients.Governors in dozens of states have delivered executive orders or guidelines directing hospitals to stop nonurgent procedures and surgeries to various degrees. Last month, the U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome M. Adams, also implored hospitals to halt elective procedures.That has left many health systems struggling to survive.Next week, Morreale said, Oneida will announce that it is putting 25% to 30% of its employees on involuntary furlough. They will have access to their health insurance through June. Physicians and senior staff at the hospital have taken a 20% pay cut."We've been here 121 years, and I'm hoping we're still there on the other side of this," Morreale said.Appalachian Regional Healthcare, a 13-hospital system in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, has seen a 30% decrease in its overall business because of a decline in patient volume and services related to the pandemic. Last week, the hospital system announced it would furlough about 8% of its workforce -- around 500 employees.Hospital executives across the country are cutting pay while also trying to repurpose employees for other jobs.At Intermountain Healthcare, which operates 215 clinics and 24 hospitals in Utah, Idaho and Nevada, about 600 of the 2,600 physicians, physicians assistants and registered nurses who are compensated based on volume will see their pay dip by about 15%, said Daron Cowley, a company spokesman.Those reductions are tied to the drop in procedures, which has fallen significantly for some specialties, he said. The organization is working to preserve employment as much as possible, in part by trying to deploy 3,000 staff members into new roles."You have an endoscopy tech right now that may be deployed to be at hospital entrances" where they would take the temperatures of people coming in, Cowley explained.In Boston, a spokesman for Partners HealthCare, with 12 hospitals, including Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's, said staff members whose work has decreased are being deployed to other areas or will be paid for up to eight weeks if no work is available.But redeployment is not always an option. Janet Conway, a spokeswoman for Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said many of the company's operating room nurses trained in specialized procedures have been furloughed because their training did not translate to other roles."Those OR nurses, many have never worked as a floor nurse," she said.Conway said nearly 300 furloughed staff members have the option to use their paid time off, but beyond that, the furlough would be unpaid. Most employees are afforded 25 days per year.Some furloughed hospital workers are likely to be asked to return as the number of coronavirus cases rise in their communities. But the unpredictable virus has offered little clarity and left hospitals, like much of the economy, in a free fall.Many health systems are making direct cuts to their payrolls, eliminating or shrinking performance bonuses and prorating paychecks to mirror reduced workload until operations stabilize.Scott Weavil, a lawyer in California who counsels physicians and other health care workers on employment contracts, said he was hearing from doctors across the country who were being asked to take pay cuts of 20% to 70%.The requests are coming from hospital administrators or private physician groups hired by the hospitals, he said, and are essentially new contracts that doctors are being asked to sign.Many of the contracts do not say when the cuts might end, and are mostly affecting doctors who are not treating coronavirus patients on the front lines, such as urologists, rheumatologists, bariatric surgeons, obstetricians and gynecologists.Such doctors are still being asked to work -- often in a decreased capacity -- yet may be risking their health going into hospitals and clinics."It's just not sitting well," Weavil said, noting that he tells doctors they unfortunately have few options if they want to work for their institution long term."If you fight this pay cut, administration could write your name down and remember that forever," he said he tells them.In other cases, physicians are continuing to find opportunities to practice in a more limited capacity, like telemedicine appointments. But that has not eliminated steep pay cuts."Physicians are only paid in our clinic based on their productivity in the work they do," said Dr. Pam Cutler, the president of Western Montana Clinic in Missoula. "So they're automatically taking a very significant -- usually greater than 50% or 25% -- pay cut just because they don't have any work."In some areas, layoffs have left behind health care workers who worry that they will not be able to find new roles or redeploy their skills.Cox in Michigan said he was briefly reassigned at his hospital, helping screen and process patients coming in with coronavirus symptoms, but eventually the people seeking reassignments outgrew the number of roles.He also expressed concern that inevitable changes in the health care industry after the pandemic -- paired with the possibility of a lengthy period of unemployment -- could make it difficult to get his job back."I'm just concerned that the job I got laid off from may not be there when this is over," Cox said. "The longer you're away, the more you worry, 'Am I going to be able to come back?' So there's a lot of anxiety about it."Even as many of the largest hospital networks grapple with sudden financial uncertainty, much smaller practices and clinics face a more immediate threat.According to a statistical model produced by HealthLandscape and the American Academy of Family Physicians, by the end of April, nearly 20,000 family physicians could be fully out of work, underemployed or reassigned elsewhere, particularly as cities like New York consider large-scale, emergency reassignments of physicians."Many of these smaller practices were living on a financial edge to start with, so they're not entering into this in a good position at all," said Dr. Gary Price, the president of the Physicians Foundation. "Their margins are narrower, their patients don't want to come in, and many of them shouldn't anyway, so their cash flow has been severely impacted and their overhead really hasn't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdownTrump repeated a favorite refrain of some conservatives, who have said that the coronavirus “cure”—that is, a nationwide shutdown—cannot be worse than the disease itself.


Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News ExplainsCoronavirus patients are showing a wide range of symptoms and the exact reason why is still a mystery — but we do have some clues as to what factors can influence the severity of the disease.


Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-ed

Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-edTweed Roosevelt, in a New York Times op-ed, said his great-grandfather would have done the same thing as Crozier.


Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital

Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital“We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,” the queen said, echoing a World War II-era song.


3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.

3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.Lockdown measures in Italy, Spain and France appear to be bearing fruit after three weeks, with daily death tolls beginning to decline.


'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.

'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.A doctor treating COVID-19 patients sits down with her husband to make a will.


U.K. Virus Deaths Slow as Government Mulls Tighter Lockdown
Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisis

Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisisCoronavirus crisis proves communism is still a grave threat to the entire world. If Beijing had just been honest, the pandemic could be preventable.


Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugees

Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugeesMalaysian authorities said they have arrested a boatload of 202 people believed to be minority Muslim Rohingya refugees after their boat was found adrift Sunday morning near the northern resort island of Langkawi. A Northern District maritime official, Capt. Zulinda Ramly, said the refugees included 152 men, 45 women and five children. Zulinda said maritime officials have taken precautionary measures to prevent any possible transmission of the COVID-19 virus while handling the group.


Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?

Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?While the term “warfare” is a useful metaphor for the kind of mobilization necessary to save lives in this crisis, it’s not a useful way to think about the primary responsibility of ordinary citizens right now, which is to stay at home.


Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDP

Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDPJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged on Monday to roll out an unprecedented economic stimulus package, equal to 20% of economic output, as his government vowed to take "all steps" to battle deepening fallout from the coronavirus. The package, to be confirmed by the cabinet on Tuesday, will total 108 trillion yen ($989 billion), far exceeding one compiled in the wake of the 2009 financial crisis totalling 56 trillion yen in size, with fiscal spending of 15 trillion yen. "We decided to carry out an unprecedentedly massive scale of economic package worth 108 trillion yen, or 20% of GDP, following the immense damage to the economy from the novel coronavirus," Abe told reporters after a meeting with senior ruling party lawmakers.


Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19

Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19The Bronx Zoo in New York says this case of human-to-animal transmission appears to be unique.


U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come

U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come"It's going to be the hardest moment for many Americans in their entire lives," Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on MSNBC's Meet the Press.


An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears

An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fearsExperts predicted the stresses of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns could lead to an uptick in domestic violence.


Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsens

Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsensWith most elective surgeries cancelled during the pandemic, hospitals experiencing revenue loss are furloughing staff members in the middle of the pandemic


‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic Drowning

‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic DrowningMaeve Kennedy Townsend McKean’s husband has posted a heartbreaking tribute to his wife—the granddaughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy—and the couple’s child, who went missing in the Chesapeake Bay Thursday afternoon.The Kennedy family announced Friday that the Coast Guard suspended the rescue effort for McKean, 40, and son Gideon, 8, who disappeared after paddling a canoe out into the bay. The effort to recover their remains is ongoing.“The search that began yesterday afternoon went on throughout the night and continued all day today,” McKean’s husband, David McKean, wrote in a Facebook post late Friday. “It is now dark again. It has been more than 24 hours, and the chances they have survived are impossibly small. It is clear that Maeve and Gideon have passed away.”The family had been self-quarantining from the novel coronavirus in a house on the bay owned by McKean’s mother, former Maryland Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, according to her husband’s post. The largely empty house provided them with more space to ride out the pandemic than their D.C. home, he said.McKean and her son were playing on a beach in a small, shallow cove behind the house at around 4 p.m. when one of them accidentally kicked a ball into the water. The two attempted to retrieve the ball by paddling a canoe into the protected cove, but ended up in the open bay where strong winds during the day had whipped up vicious currents.“The cove is protected, with much calmer wind and water than in the greater Chesapeake,” David McKean wrote. “They got into a canoe, intending simply to retrieve the ball, and somehow got pushed by wind or tide into the open bay.”About 30 minutes later, an onlooker called emergency services to report seeing the pair struggling to paddle to the shore. That was the last anyone saw of them. The Coast Guard recovered their capsized canoe miles away from the beach at 7 p.m. Friday.David McKean wrote tenderly of his late son, recalling his love of sports and strong morals.“He was deeply compassionate, declining to sing children’s songs if they contained a hint of animals or people being treated cruelly,” he wrote. “And he was brave, leading his friends in games, standing up to people who he thought were wrong (including his parents), and relishing opportunities to go on adventures with friends, even those he’d just met.”“I used to marvel at him as a toddler and worry that he was too perfect to exist in this world,” he added. “It seems to me now that he was.”His wife, McKean wrote, was “magical,” with “endless energy” and a laugh you could hear a block away.“Maeve turned 40 in November, and she was my everything,” he wrote. “She was my best friend and my soulmate. I have already thought many times over today that I need to remember to tell Maeve about something that’s happening. I am terrified by the idea that this will fade over time.”The couple met while working for Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and were married in 2003. Maeve served in the Peace Corp, with the State Department’s global AIDS program, and in the Obama administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, before signing on as executive director of the Georgetown University Global Health Initiative.“Maeve was vivid,” her mother, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, said in a statement Friday night. “You always knew when she was in a room. Her laughter was loud, unabashed and infectious.” McKean’s cousin, Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), posted on Twitter: “We love you Maeve. We love you Gideon. Our family has lost two of the brightest lights.”McKean is survived by her 7-year-old daughter, Gabriella, and 2-year-old son, Toby. “I know soon he will start to ask for Maeve and Gideon,” her husband wrote of Toby. “It breaks my heart that he will not get to have them as a mother and brother.”In his Facebook post, David McKean asked friends and family to share photos of his late wife and son.“As Gabriella and Toby lay sleeping next to me last night, I promised them that I would do my best to be the parent that Maeve was, and to be the person that Gideon clearly would have grown up to be,” he wrote. “Part of that is keeping their memories alive.”The Kennedy family has endured an extraordinary amount of tragedy over several generations, from the high-profile assassinations of McKean’s grandfather and great-uncle to the fatal plane crash that killed John F. Kennedy Jr., to the heart attack that killed Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s niece, Kara, in 2011 and the death by suicide of his ex-wife, Mary, in 2012.Just last year, McKean’s cousin, Saoirse Roisin Kennedy Hill, died of an accidental drug overdose at the Kennedy family compound in Cape Cod.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers

Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippersThe largest maritime operation ever undertaken in Sydney Harbour was completed on Sunday with the successful restocking and refuelling of five cruise ships, Australian police said. It was part of government efforts since mid-March to force vessels to leave the country's waters to prevent any further spread of the coronavirus in Australia. Cruise ship guests have so far accounted for almost 10 percent of Australia's more than 5,500 infections.


Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.


Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirusJust a little over a month after saying there was no need for the community at large to wear masks in public, the CDC has changed its mind, recommending that all Americans should wear some sort of face covering when venturing outside.


Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly

Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly“As an Inspector General, I was legally obligated to ensure that whistleblowers had an effective and authorized means to disclose urgent matter.”


Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price war

Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price warSaudi Arabia is taking unprecedented action in delaying the release of its international crude selling prices by five days, a senior Saudi source familiar with the matter said on Sunday, as the kingdom and other major producers seek to halt the free-fall in worldwide crude prices. A month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic, has cut the price of crude to $34 a barrel from $65.


Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar

Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soarThe measures aim to avert a major outbreak in its major cities but fall short of a lockdown.


Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank

Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bankAt least five children ate candy containing high THC doses after the Utah Food Bank distributed it as part of their food donations, police said.


A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up there

A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up thereThe Princess Cruises ship was one of several cruise ships stuck at sea seeking a port, and was turned away several times before reaching Miami.


Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month

Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month(Bloomberg) -- The deadly coronavirus may infect as many as 95,000 people in Indonesia by next month before easing, a minister said, as authorities ordered people to wear face masks to contain the pandemic.The dire forecast, which came as the country reported its biggest daily spike in confirmed cases, is based on a projection by the nation’s intelligence agency, University of Indonesia and Bandung Institute of Technology, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told lawmakers in Jakarta. The estimate was discussed at a cabinet meeting held by President Joko Widodo earlier on Monday, she said.Indonesia has seen a surge in infections in recent weeks after reporting its first cases only in early March. While the death toll from the pandemic at 209 is the highest in Asia after China, confirmed cases at 2,491 in a country of almost 270 million people is fewer than those reported in smaller countries such as Malaysia and the Philippines. Authorities reported 218 new Covid-19 cases on Monday. “The situation is very dynamic,” Indrawati said. “The government continues to monitor and take more steps as estimates show that the cases may peak in April and May.”Jokowi, as Widodo is known, has declared a national health emergency and ordered large scale social distancing to contain the spread of the virus that has infected almost 1.3 million people worldwide. On Monday, the president ordered authorities to ensure availability of face masks for every household as he appealed to citizens to cover their faces to contain the pandemic.The world’s fourth-most populous nation, along with India and the Philippines, could soon become the next Covid-19 hot spots given their large populations, weak health care infrastructure and social security net, according to Nomura Holdings Inc.Mortality RateThe highest mortality rate in Asia may signal the actual number of infections may be much higher than reported in Indonesia, reflecting a lack of Covid-19 testing capacity, Nomura said in a report last week. The country may eventually be forced to implement a complete lockdown in April and possibly for an extended period, Nomura said.The president has rejected calls to lock down cities and regions to fight the virus, saying such harsh steps would hurt the poor the most. But the surge in cases has overwhelmed the country’s health care system, with authorities struggling to procure enough personal protection equipment, hazmat suits and ventilators for medical workers.Some local administrations have sought permission to impose large scale social distancing measures under a new rule issued by the Health Ministry, Doni Monardo, chief of the government’s task force on coronavirus said Monday. The steps will allow police and other law enforcement agencies to take “measurable actions”, according to officials.Indonesia Slashes Growth Forecast by More Than Half on Virus The police will step up a crackdown on gathering of people across the archipelago to aid the government efforts to break the virus chain, national police spokesman Argo Yuwono said in a televised briefing Monday. Law enforcement agencies have also investigated more than a dozen cases of hoarding of food, masks and other essential supplies and price gouging, he said.Jokowi said a plan to release prisoners from the nation’s crowded jails should be limited to those serving terms for general crimes and not those convicted for corruption and other serious offenses. The president also ordered speedier reallocation of budget to tackle the health and economic impact of the pandemic, his office said in a statement.(Updates with latest coronavirus data in third paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Washington state returns ventilators for use in New York

Washington state returns ventilators for use in New YorkWashington Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that the state will return more than 400 ventilators of the 500 it has received from the federal government so they can go to New York and other states hit harder by the coronavirus. The Democratic governor said Sunday that his statewide stay-at-home order and weeks of social distancing have led to slower rates of infections and deaths in Washington. Washington state has 7,666 confirmed cases of the virus and 322 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday afternoon.


US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospital

US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospitalThe coronavirus threatened Americans with their hardest week in memory on Monday and put Britain's prime minister in hospital, despite early signs that some of Europe's hardest-hit countries may be turning a corner. Japan announced an imminent state of emergency and a trillion-dollar stimulus package, after the US surgeon general compared the likely impact of the epidemic in the week ahead to 9/11 or Pearl Harbor. In London, virus-stricken Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent the night in hospital for tests, after Queen Elizabeth II delivered a rare emergency address in a 68-year reign to urge Britain to "remain united and resolute".


'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisis

'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisisQueen Elizabeth II delivered a brief speech on Sunday during the growing coronavirus crisis.


Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus

Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not CoronavirusThe idea that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks—especially one who’s been rewarded for bad behavior—is particularly poignant when we consider President Trump’s firing Friday of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the Intelligence Community. Trump has a track record of firing and retaliating against officials who don’t blindly follow his orders and mimic his mood swings, no matter how unethical, illegal, dangerous, or irresponsible.At the same time, Trump has a track record of decimating our intelligence agencies. His history of insulting the intelligence community, cherry-picking intelligence to suit his personal narratives, prioritizing loyalty over experience, and rooting out anyone who speaks truth (a core mission of the intelligence community) that he doesn’t like have been the key themes underlining his relationship with the intelligence community.Plus, Trump has never supported oversight, unless of course it’s focused on Democrats. The impetus for Atkinson’s firing—namely his work to fulfill his statutory obligations to pass on what he judged to be an urgent and credible whistleblower complaint about the president’s call with Ukrainian President Zelensky—didn’t jibe with Trump’s personal desire to avoid oversight. Team Trump Stirs Up Completely Bogus Claim About WhistleblowerHis political cronies, House Republicans on the intelligence community, even started investigating Atkinson. The inspector general’s job is largely to detect fraud, waste, and mismanagement, not to be complicit in it. The IC IG’s mandate is to do so with integrity, professionalism, and independence. Atkinson fulfilled those responsibilities, and he was fired for doing so.But, Trump has largely escaped paying any price for his actions. The Republican Party for the most part has stayed silent about his degradation of intelligence and manipulation of oversight to shield himself.While Atkinson’s firing comes as no surprise in light of the president’s habitual misuse and abuse of the intelligence community, coupled with his disdain for oversight more broadly, it will have costs for U.S. national security today, tomorrow, and further down the road.The timing of Atkinson’s removal could not be worse. Trump’s decision to fire Atkinson in the midst of an unprecedented national crisis signals what his priorities are: his personal insecurity trumps national security. His need to settle a perceived vendetta and to remove someone who he perceives to have wronged him is putting additional pressure on an already strained IC. This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for the US government. The coronavirus crisis has introduced myriad new threats for the IC to analyze while concurrently straining resources as the workforce tries to protect itself through measures like social distancing, working from home, and shift work. This is not the time when the intelligence community needs any fewer competent officials on board. Nor is it the time to put more pressure on intelligence officials by introducing an unnecessary transition in IG leadership. That is a drain of resources as staff scramble to brief up the new acting IG. It’s undoubtedly a further blow to morale.And, Trump didn’t just fire Atkinson and allow him to serve out his statutorily outlined 30-day transition period. Atkinson reportedly didn’t know about his removal in advance and has now been placed on administration leave. The relevant statute requires that both intelligence committees be notified 30 days before the inspector general can be dismissed. By putting Atkinson on leave and not giving him the time to brief up his successor and transition his work there’s a real chance that someone drops the ball, somewhere, on critical work. But, then again, maybe that’s what the President is hoping for - that oversight is damaged. This may be an operational bonus for POTUS.An actual leader—a responsible president—would minimize pressure on the IC right now because they have critical national security work to do and cycling out one of the president’s perceived enemies doesn’t fall within that necessary for national security to do list. Atkinson’s removal is about retribution but it’s also about sending a message to the intel community at large and to everyone considering throwing their name in the mix as a nominee to fill Atkinson’s shoes. Trump’s letter to Congress regarding Atkinson’s firing noted that Atkinson no longer has his “fullest confidence.” However, there is no indication that Atkinson did not perform his job. In fact, the chairman of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency—an independent executive branch agency—and the IG of the Justice Department reacted to Atkinson’s removal in saying that “Inspector General Atkinson is known throughout the Inspector General community for his integrity, professionalism, and commitment to the rule of law and independent oversight.” Atkinson lost Trump’s confidence because he wouldn’t become a partisan tool when both as an IG and as a member of the intelligence community, objective, non-partisan work is part of the job description. Because of Trump’s actions, however, anyone considering taking the job will have to be willing not to uphold the law but to bend it to please POTUS.The broader and longer-term impact on recruitment and retention in the IC is that Trump has changed the cost benefit analysis associated with serving in the intelligence community right now. In the short term, at least, the IG’s office is hamstrung in its ability to fully function at a time when it is sorely needed for whistleblowers, for efficiency, and for oversight of critical intelligence-related issues impacting our national security, including coronavirus.Trump’s narcissism—his prioritization of self over country—is on full display. He’s never been known for his intelligence, but this latest move in a litany of dangerous behavior is going to cost us.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land borders

China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land bordersMainland China reported 39 new coronavirus cases as of Sunday, up from 30 a day earlier, and the number of asymptomatic cases also surged as the government vowed tighter controls at land borders. The National Health Commission said on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of Sunday, compared with 47 the day before. Imported cases and asymptomatic patients, who show no symptoms but can still pass the virus on, have become China's chief concern after draconian containment measures succeeded in slashing the overall infection rate.


Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understatedPublic health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said.There are many reasons why the numbers are underreported. Strict criteria in the beginning of the outbreak kept many people from getting tested for coronavirus, and it's still difficult to get tested in some areas, for example. There's also the matter of false negatives, and not all medical examiners have tests or believe they should conduct postmortem testing, even on people who died at home or in nursing homes where there were outbreaks. Experts also believe some February and early March deaths that were attributed to influenza or pneumonia were likely due to coronavirus.The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths. The Post, other media outlets, and university researchers update their numbers more frequently, with the Post reporting on Sunday night that 9,633 people have died from coronavirus in the U.S., and at least 337,000 cases have been confirmed.More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers

Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakersThe man attacked local officials with a scythe after they told him to wear a face mask, according to a police report.


Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.

Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon."We are suffering very much. It's a devastating pain," Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said on Sunday.


Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump

Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump(Bloomberg) -- Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is set to declare a state of emergency, media reports said, after coronavirus cases in Tokyo jumped over the weekend to top 1,000, raising worries of a more explosive surge.After last week saying the situation didn’t yet call for such a move, Abe changed course and will announce the plan as soon as Monday, media reports said. The formal declaration for the Tokyo area will be coming as early as Tuesday, the Yomiuri newspaper reported without attribution. The declaration could also cover the surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Saitama and Kanagawa, as well as Osaka, and be given a time limit of six months, broadcaster TBS said, citing sources close to the matter.The process for making the declaration picked up pace Monday, with Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura, who is handling the virus response, meeting Abe alongside the government’s top expert adviser on the pandemic. The premier may unveil his plan at a meeting of his virus task force after 6 p.m.The declaration could go into effect as Japan’s biggest-ever stimulus package worth 60 trillion yen ($550 billion) is set to be announced Tuesday.No LockdownThe state of emergency, which comes after pressure from local governors and the medical community, doesn’t enable a European-style lockdown.Declaring a state of emergency hands powers to local governments, including to urge residents to stay at home for a certain span of time during the emergency period. By contrast with some other countries though, there is no legal power to enforce such requests due to civil liberties protections in Japanese law.Abe’s government saw its approval rating slip to its lowest since October 2018 in a poll from broadcaster JNN released Monday with a majority of respondents faulting the way the government has managed the virus crisis. The poll taken April 4-5 showed that about 80% of respondents said the declaration should be made.The governors of Tokyo and Osaka have been pushing for the declaration as the recent spike in cases sparked concerns Japan is headed for a crisis on the levels seen in the U.S. and several countries in Europe.Japan was one of the first countries outside of the original epicenter in neighboring China to confirm a coronavirus infection and it has fared better than most, with about 3,650 reported cases as of Monday -- a jump from less than 500 just a month ago. That’s the lowest tally of any Group of Seven country, although Japan might be finding fewer mild cases because it has conducted a relatively small number of tests.Last week, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo advised American citizens who live in the U.S. but are currently in Japan to return home, “unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.” It added Japan’s low testing rate makes it hard to accurately assess the prevalence of the virus. The Japan Medical Association warned last week that the jump in cases in the nation’s most populous cities is putting more pressure on medical resources and that the government should declare a state of emergency.Tokyo reported 143 new coronavirus infections on Sunday, the largest number in a single day. It marked the second straight day the city’s daily infection tally exceeded 100.Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is already pressing residents to avoid unnecessary outings, and television showed many of the capital’s main shopping areas almost deserted over the weekend. The Tokyo local government is set to begin leasing hotels this week to accommodate mild cases, making room in its hospitals for the seriously ill.(Updates with media reports on area, time period)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled"If I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," said Grace Mitchell.


Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemic

Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemicRoughly 40 million black Americans are deciding whether to put their faith in government and the medical community during the coronavirus pandemic. Historic failures in government responses to disasters and emergencies, medical abuse, neglect and exploitation have jaded generations of black people into a distrust of some public institutions.


Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdown

Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdownFunke Akindele recently appeared in a public health video to raise awareness about coronavirus.


Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online convention

Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online conventionJoe Biden said Sunday that the Democratic National Convention, already delayed until August because of the coronavirus, may need to take place online as the pandemic continues to reshape the race for the White House. The party "may have to do a virtual convention,” the former vice president said. Biden has a commanding lead in the number of delegates needed to secure his party's presidential nomination at a convention in Milwaukee, originally scheduled for mid-July.


Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’

Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’Iranian health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur on Sunday criticized Chinese government statistics on the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, appearing to blame those statistics for other countries' slow response to the emerging pandemic."It seems statistics from China [were] a bitter joke, because many in the world thought this is just like influenza, with fewer deaths," Jahanpur said during a video conference in remarks translated by Radio Farda. "This [impression] were based on reports from China and now it seems China made a bitter joke with the rest of the world."Jahanpur added, "If in China they say an epidemic was controlled in two months, one should really think about it."The remarks caused a spat with Chinese officials, with China's ambassador to Iran saying the country should " show respect to the truths and great efforts of the people of China." Jahanpur took to Twitter to criticize Chinese statistics yet again, but subsequently offered praise of China, an ally of Iran."The support offered by China to the Iranian people in these trying times is unforgettable," Jahanpur wrote on Monday.While Iran has reported over 60,000 cases of coronavirus with more than 3,700 deaths as of Monday, U.S. officials believe the extent of the outbreak is much wider than the government has revealed. In late February, Iranian parliament members criticized their own government for concealing "horrific numbers" of deaths in the country.


Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official

Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: officialIran will never ask the United States for help in the fight against the new coronavirus, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has rejected offers from Washington for humanitarian assistance for Iran, the Middle Eastern country so far worst-affected by the coronavirus, with 3,739 deaths and 60,500 people infected according to the latest figures on Monday. "Iran has never asked and will not ask America to help Tehran in its fight against the outbreak ... But America should lift all its illegal unilateral sanctions on Iran," Mousavi said in a televised news conference.


Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve This

Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve ThisAs states around the U.S. scavenge for ventilators to treat the wave of critically ill coronavirus patients, doctors on the front lines are confronting not just the question of when they will get them, but when they should use them.The grim fact is that most people infected with COVID-19 who are sedated, intubated, and hooked up to a mechanical breathing machine will not survive. This is in part a function of just how sick they are when doctors finally resort to a ventilator, but also due in part to the damage ventilators cause to the lungs. The longer someone is on a ventilator, the lower the odds they will ever breathe again on their own.“It’s just a bridge to keep them going,” Marco Garrone, an emergency-medicine physician in Turin, Italy, told The Daily Beast. “It’s just a sort of last-ditch resort to buy time for them to heal... for the whole body to overcome the illness.”But unlike with some other respiratory diseases, there is no proven treatment for COVID-19. Doctors around the globe have reported survival numbers that show how difficult it is for an intubated patient to outrace the disease. Garrone and his colleagues say only 20 percent make it, while a London study found a slightly larger proportion.“These patients do extremely badly on mechanical vents,” Garrone said. At the same time, ventilators also represent the only hope for those whose oxygen levels continue to plunge—explaining why U.S. governors are so desperate to make sure they have enough.“You need ventilators, that’s for sure,” Garrone emphasized. “I agree 100 percent with what Gov. Cuomo said.”Trump Vows to Send Ventilators to Europe as U.S. Governors Plead for SuppliesThe challenge then is to find something less extreme than a ventilator to act as the bridge and buy patients the time they need to recover—a challenge that is all the more daunting given that doctors and researchers are still learning how the novel coronavirus behaves.“It is a brand-new disease,” Derek Angus, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a renowned authority on intensive care, told The Daily Beast. Before moving to a ventilator, Garrone often uses a mask to administer oxygen via continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP. He compared it to home CPAP machines used to keep open the airways of people with sleep apnea. “Exactly the same,” Garrone said. “Higher pressure.”He added, “I have a good number of people who did really well on CPAP. I’m not saying everybody fares well, [that] CPAP works with everyone. Start them on CPAP and try to keep them on CPAP as much as you can.”Another non-invasive option is a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers oxygen via a two-pronged tube fitted to the nose rather than via a mask as with CPAP. But both methods can potentially aerosolize virus particles, sending them into the air. That is not a threat to COVID-19 patients, but could constitute a considerable danger to those not infected with the disease, including health-care workers and first responders—especially those running short of personal protective equipment.In Kirkland, Washington, county health officials postulated that paramedics may have inadvertently furthered the spread of coronavirus when they employed CPAP machines to treat residents of the Life Care Center nursing home—where dozens eventually died.Angus said on a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) podcast last week that the jury is still out on whether the high-flow nasal cannula could pose a similar problem.“We have not worked out at this point exactly how safe that is,” he said.Further complicating the question of when to intubate is the deceptive and mercurial nature of COVID-19. A bad turn can come just as quickly as a new one.Greg Neyman, an emergency physician in New Jersey, has noted that COVID-19 patients can appear to be in little distress at oxygen levels that ordinarily would have people gasping for breath and maybe tearing off their air mask. Instead, COVID-19 patients can appear to be “just a little fluish.”“It’s something we’re not used to in emergency medicine and critical care,” Neyman told The Daily Beast.President Trump Insists New York Will Be ‘Fine,’ Won’t Need Extra VentilatorsThe coronavirus patient’s lungs continue to function mechanically. But even as they inhale and exhale, inflating and deflating their lungs, they can be hypoxic, or short of oxygen in the blood. The lungs may work, but the oxygen does not reach them.  And there is a concern that an exhausted and overwhelmed medical staff might fail to note ongoing labored breathing. “How safely can we use non-invasive ventilation?” Angus asked the JAMA podcast. “It would be terrible if [a patient] had acute respiratory failure without someone able to get to the bedside and intubate.”Because COVID-19 can worsen so precipitously, doctors may have only a small window in which to make the decision to intubate.When the time comes, Garrone asks the patient—who is generally still conscious and cognizant—for verbal consent before inducing a coma from which they have a painfully low chance of emerging.“I don’t think they are aware of how the odds are against them and it would be very harsh of us, almost cruel, to tell them,” Garrone told The Daily Beast. “Besides, when they are proposed with intubation there is really no other reasonable course of action left.”Doctors are trying to figure out new courses of action in real time, as their ICUs fill up and their ventilator supplies run low. Researchers are racing to analyze the outcomes to better inform the decision-making process.“We don’t know enough yet,” said Angus. “We want more data.”He offered a comparison of the fight we face with brand new COVID-19.“Trench warfare in the First World War,” he said.But in truth, the life-and-death decisions on the battlefield were simple compared to those faced by ICU doctors. Even when hospitals have enough ventilators.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'

Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'Aides have become 'increasingly worried' about prime minister Boris Johnson's health after he tested positive for the coronavirus.


What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?

What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to announce a state of emergency as soon as Tuesday in several parts of the country, including Tokyo, where coronavirus infections are spiking. The declaration is not nationwide. Abe said Monday it would cover Tokyo, as well as neighbouring Chiba, Kanagawa and Saitama, the western hub of Osaka and neighbouring Hyogo, as well as the southwestern region of Fukuoka.


Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'

Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued some dire warnings since the early days of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus, but on Sunday he indicated some steps taken by the U.S. federal government and states might be paying off -- both in terms of curbing the spread and preparing the health-care system for an onslaught of patients.New York City remains the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, and its hospitals are struggling. Gottlieb reiterated the predication made by numerous officials that the city, and New York state, are on the verge of peaking next week, which will undoubtedly stretch the health-care system thin. But he said he, ultimately, he thinks there will be enough ventilators for severe COVID-19 patients thanks to a historic effort to expand their supply, preventing New York from going past its tipping point.> The New York healthcare system "will be right on the brink" \- strained - "but won't go over" @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan . He adds, "I don't think they will run out of ventilators." pic.twitter.com/AhnAanf4rN> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020As for the rest of the country, Gottlieb believes mitigation efforts like social distancing are "clearly working," as case rates slow in northern states, though he's concerned the next set of hot spots will be in the South. > "Mitigation is clearly working," @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan, but notes that states in the Sunbelt - across the south - are going to be the next hotspots in the United States. pic.twitter.com/wD4q1Z5yUf> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judge

1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judgePatrick Jones "spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him," one of his former lawyers said.


Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby Princess

Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby PrincessPassengers from the Ruby Princess disembarked in Sydney without knowing the coronavirus was on board.


Puerto Rico discovers protective supply cache amid COVID-19
Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacy

Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacySince assuming office in January 2017, Mr. Trump has appointed 193 judges to the federal bench, a staggering figure with few recent precedents.


Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlook

Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlookGlobal benchmark oil prices traded as much as $3 a barrel lower as the market opened for Monday's trading session, reflecting fears of oversupply after Saudi Arabia and Russia postponed to Thursday a meeting about a potential pact to cut production. Late last week, prices had surged, with both U.S. and Brent contracts posting their largest weekly percentage gains on record due to hopes that OPEC and its allies would strike a global deal to cut crude supply worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus has cut demand and a month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia has left the market awash in crude.


During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health Workers

During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health WorkersAs hospitals across the country brace for an onslaught of coronavirus patients, doctors, nurses and other health care workers -- even in emerging hot spots -- are being furloughed, reassigned or told they must take pay cuts.The job cuts, which stretch from Massachusetts to Nevada, are a new and possibly urgent problem for a business-oriented health care system whose hospitals must earn revenue even in a national crisis. Hospitals large and small have canceled many elective services -- often under state government orders -- as they prepare for the virus, sending revenues plummeting.That has left trained health care workers sidelined, even in areas around Detroit and Washington, where infection rates are climbing, and even as hard-hit hospitals are pleading for help."I'm 46. I've never been on unemployment in my life," said Casey Cox, who three weeks ago worked two jobs, one conducting sleep research at the University of Michigan and another as a technician at the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Hospital near Ann Arbor, Michigan. Within a week, he had lost both.Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York has begged doctors and other medical workers from around the country to come to the city to help in areas where the coronavirus is overwhelming hospitals."Unless there is a national effort to enlist doctors, nurses, hospital workers of all kinds and get them where they are needed most in the country in time, I don't see, honestly, how we're going to have the professionals we need to get through this crisis," de Blasio said Friday morning on MSNBC.And the Department of Veterans Affairs is scrambling to hire health care workers for its government-run hospitals, especially in hard-hit New Orleans and Detroit, where many staff members have fallen ill. The department moved to get a federal waiver to hire retired medical workers to beef up staff levels.But even as some hospitals are straining to handle the influx of coronavirus patients, empty hospital beds elsewhere carry their own burden."We're in trouble," said Gene Morreale, the chief executive of Oneida Health Hospital in upstate New York, which has not yet seen a surge in coronavirus patients.Governors in dozens of states have delivered executive orders or guidelines directing hospitals to stop nonurgent procedures and surgeries to various degrees. Last month, the U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome M. Adams, also implored hospitals to halt elective procedures.That has left many health systems struggling to survive.Next week, Morreale said, Oneida will announce that it is putting 25% to 30% of its employees on involuntary furlough. They will have access to their health insurance through June. Physicians and senior staff at the hospital have taken a 20% pay cut."We've been here 121 years, and I'm hoping we're still there on the other side of this," Morreale said.Appalachian Regional Healthcare, a 13-hospital system in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, has seen a 30% decrease in its overall business because of a decline in patient volume and services related to the pandemic. Last week, the hospital system announced it would furlough about 8% of its workforce -- around 500 employees.Hospital executives across the country are cutting pay while also trying to repurpose employees for other jobs.At Intermountain Healthcare, which operates 215 clinics and 24 hospitals in Utah, Idaho and Nevada, about 600 of the 2,600 physicians, physicians assistants and registered nurses who are compensated based on volume will see their pay dip by about 15%, said Daron Cowley, a company spokesman.Those reductions are tied to the drop in procedures, which has fallen significantly for some specialties, he said. The organization is working to preserve employment as much as possible, in part by trying to deploy 3,000 staff members into new roles."You have an endoscopy tech right now that may be deployed to be at hospital entrances" where they would take the temperatures of people coming in, Cowley explained.In Boston, a spokesman for Partners HealthCare, with 12 hospitals, including Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's, said staff members whose work has decreased are being deployed to other areas or will be paid for up to eight weeks if no work is available.But redeployment is not always an option. Janet Conway, a spokeswoman for Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said many of the company's operating room nurses trained in specialized procedures have been furloughed because their training did not translate to other roles."Those OR nurses, many have never worked as a floor nurse," she said.Conway said nearly 300 furloughed staff members have the option to use their paid time off, but beyond that, the furlough would be unpaid. Most employees are afforded 25 days per year.Some furloughed hospital workers are likely to be asked to return as the number of coronavirus cases rise in their communities. But the unpredictable virus has offered little clarity and left hospitals, like much of the economy, in a free fall.Many health systems are making direct cuts to their payrolls, eliminating or shrinking performance bonuses and prorating paychecks to mirror reduced workload until operations stabilize.Scott Weavil, a lawyer in California who counsels physicians and other health care workers on employment contracts, said he was hearing from doctors across the country who were being asked to take pay cuts of 20% to 70%.The requests are coming from hospital administrators or private physician groups hired by the hospitals, he said, and are essentially new contracts that doctors are being asked to sign.Many of the contracts do not say when the cuts might end, and are mostly affecting doctors who are not treating coronavirus patients on the front lines, such as urologists, rheumatologists, bariatric surgeons, obstetricians and gynecologists.Such doctors are still being asked to work -- often in a decreased capacity -- yet may be risking their health going into hospitals and clinics."It's just not sitting well," Weavil said, noting that he tells doctors they unfortunately have few options if they want to work for their institution long term."If you fight this pay cut, administration could write your name down and remember that forever," he said he tells them.In other cases, physicians are continuing to find opportunities to practice in a more limited capacity, like telemedicine appointments. But that has not eliminated steep pay cuts."Physicians are only paid in our clinic based on their productivity in the work they do," said Dr. Pam Cutler, the president of Western Montana Clinic in Missoula. "So they're automatically taking a very significant -- usually greater than 50% or 25% -- pay cut just because they don't have any work."In some areas, layoffs have left behind health care workers who worry that they will not be able to find new roles or redeploy their skills.Cox in Michigan said he was briefly reassigned at his hospital, helping screen and process patients coming in with coronavirus symptoms, but eventually the people seeking reassignments outgrew the number of roles.He also expressed concern that inevitable changes in the health care industry after the pandemic -- paired with the possibility of a lengthy period of unemployment -- could make it difficult to get his job back."I'm just concerned that the job I got laid off from may not be there when this is over," Cox said. "The longer you're away, the more you worry, 'Am I going to be able to come back?' So there's a lot of anxiety about it."Even as many of the largest hospital networks grapple with sudden financial uncertainty, much smaller practices and clinics face a more immediate threat.According to a statistical model produced by HealthLandscape and the American Academy of Family Physicians, by the end of April, nearly 20,000 family physicians could be fully out of work, underemployed or reassigned elsewhere, particularly as cities like New York consider large-scale, emergency reassignments of physicians."Many of these smaller practices were living on a financial edge to start with, so they're not entering into this in a good position at all," said Dr. Gary Price, the president of the Physicians Foundation. "Their margins are narrower, their patients don't want to come in, and many of them shouldn't anyway, so their cash flow has been severely impacted and their overhead really hasn't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdownTrump repeated a favorite refrain of some conservatives, who have said that the coronavirus “cure”—that is, a nationwide shutdown—cannot be worse than the disease itself.


Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News ExplainsCoronavirus patients are showing a wide range of symptoms and the exact reason why is still a mystery — but we do have some clues as to what factors can influence the severity of the disease.


Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-ed

Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-edTweed Roosevelt, in a New York Times op-ed, said his great-grandfather would have done the same thing as Crozier.


Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital

Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital“We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,” the queen said, echoing a World War II-era song.


3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.

3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.Lockdown measures in Italy, Spain and France appear to be bearing fruit after three weeks, with daily death tolls beginning to decline.


'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.

'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.A doctor treating COVID-19 patients sits down with her husband to make a will.


U.K. Virus Deaths Slow as Government Mulls Tighter Lockdown
Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisis

Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisisCoronavirus crisis proves communism is still a grave threat to the entire world. If Beijing had just been honest, the pandemic could be preventable.


Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugees

Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugeesMalaysian authorities said they have arrested a boatload of 202 people believed to be minority Muslim Rohingya refugees after their boat was found adrift Sunday morning near the northern resort island of Langkawi. A Northern District maritime official, Capt. Zulinda Ramly, said the refugees included 152 men, 45 women and five children. Zulinda said maritime officials have taken precautionary measures to prevent any possible transmission of the COVID-19 virus while handling the group.


Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?

Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?While the term “warfare” is a useful metaphor for the kind of mobilization necessary to save lives in this crisis, it’s not a useful way to think about the primary responsibility of ordinary citizens right now, which is to stay at home.


Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDP

Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDPJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged on Monday to roll out an unprecedented economic stimulus package, equal to 20% of economic output, as his government vowed to take "all steps" to battle deepening fallout from the coronavirus. The package, to be confirmed by the cabinet on Tuesday, will total 108 trillion yen ($989 billion), far exceeding one compiled in the wake of the 2009 financial crisis totalling 56 trillion yen in size, with fiscal spending of 15 trillion yen. "We decided to carry out an unprecedentedly massive scale of economic package worth 108 trillion yen, or 20% of GDP, following the immense damage to the economy from the novel coronavirus," Abe told reporters after a meeting with senior ruling party lawmakers.


Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19

Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19The Bronx Zoo in New York says this case of human-to-animal transmission appears to be unique.


U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come

U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come"It's going to be the hardest moment for many Americans in their entire lives," Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on MSNBC's Meet the Press.


An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears

An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fearsExperts predicted the stresses of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns could lead to an uptick in domestic violence.


Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsens

Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsensWith most elective surgeries cancelled during the pandemic, hospitals experiencing revenue loss are furloughing staff members in the middle of the pandemic


‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic Drowning

‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic DrowningMaeve Kennedy Townsend McKean’s husband has posted a heartbreaking tribute to his wife—the granddaughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy—and the couple’s child, who went missing in the Chesapeake Bay Thursday afternoon.The Kennedy family announced Friday that the Coast Guard suspended the rescue effort for McKean, 40, and son Gideon, 8, who disappeared after paddling a canoe out into the bay. The effort to recover their remains is ongoing.“The search that began yesterday afternoon went on throughout the night and continued all day today,” McKean’s husband, David McKean, wrote in a Facebook post late Friday. “It is now dark again. It has been more than 24 hours, and the chances they have survived are impossibly small. It is clear that Maeve and Gideon have passed away.”The family had been self-quarantining from the novel coronavirus in a house on the bay owned by McKean’s mother, former Maryland Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, according to her husband’s post. The largely empty house provided them with more space to ride out the pandemic than their D.C. home, he said.McKean and her son were playing on a beach in a small, shallow cove behind the house at around 4 p.m. when one of them accidentally kicked a ball into the water. The two attempted to retrieve the ball by paddling a canoe into the protected cove, but ended up in the open bay where strong winds during the day had whipped up vicious currents.“The cove is protected, with much calmer wind and water than in the greater Chesapeake,” David McKean wrote. “They got into a canoe, intending simply to retrieve the ball, and somehow got pushed by wind or tide into the open bay.”About 30 minutes later, an onlooker called emergency services to report seeing the pair struggling to paddle to the shore. That was the last anyone saw of them. The Coast Guard recovered their capsized canoe miles away from the beach at 7 p.m. Friday.David McKean wrote tenderly of his late son, recalling his love of sports and strong morals.“He was deeply compassionate, declining to sing children’s songs if they contained a hint of animals or people being treated cruelly,” he wrote. “And he was brave, leading his friends in games, standing up to people who he thought were wrong (including his parents), and relishing opportunities to go on adventures with friends, even those he’d just met.”“I used to marvel at him as a toddler and worry that he was too perfect to exist in this world,” he added. “It seems to me now that he was.”His wife, McKean wrote, was “magical,” with “endless energy” and a laugh you could hear a block away.“Maeve turned 40 in November, and she was my everything,” he wrote. “She was my best friend and my soulmate. I have already thought many times over today that I need to remember to tell Maeve about something that’s happening. I am terrified by the idea that this will fade over time.”The couple met while working for Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and were married in 2003. Maeve served in the Peace Corp, with the State Department’s global AIDS program, and in the Obama administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, before signing on as executive director of the Georgetown University Global Health Initiative.“Maeve was vivid,” her mother, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, said in a statement Friday night. “You always knew when she was in a room. Her laughter was loud, unabashed and infectious.” McKean’s cousin, Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), posted on Twitter: “We love you Maeve. We love you Gideon. Our family has lost two of the brightest lights.”McKean is survived by her 7-year-old daughter, Gabriella, and 2-year-old son, Toby. “I know soon he will start to ask for Maeve and Gideon,” her husband wrote of Toby. “It breaks my heart that he will not get to have them as a mother and brother.”In his Facebook post, David McKean asked friends and family to share photos of his late wife and son.“As Gabriella and Toby lay sleeping next to me last night, I promised them that I would do my best to be the parent that Maeve was, and to be the person that Gideon clearly would have grown up to be,” he wrote. “Part of that is keeping their memories alive.”The Kennedy family has endured an extraordinary amount of tragedy over several generations, from the high-profile assassinations of McKean’s grandfather and great-uncle to the fatal plane crash that killed John F. Kennedy Jr., to the heart attack that killed Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s niece, Kara, in 2011 and the death by suicide of his ex-wife, Mary, in 2012.Just last year, McKean’s cousin, Saoirse Roisin Kennedy Hill, died of an accidental drug overdose at the Kennedy family compound in Cape Cod.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers

Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippersThe largest maritime operation ever undertaken in Sydney Harbour was completed on Sunday with the successful restocking and refuelling of five cruise ships, Australian police said. It was part of government efforts since mid-March to force vessels to leave the country's waters to prevent any further spread of the coronavirus in Australia. Cruise ship guests have so far accounted for almost 10 percent of Australia's more than 5,500 infections.


Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.


Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirusJust a little over a month after saying there was no need for the community at large to wear masks in public, the CDC has changed its mind, recommending that all Americans should wear some sort of face covering when venturing outside.


Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly

Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly“As an Inspector General, I was legally obligated to ensure that whistleblowers had an effective and authorized means to disclose urgent matter.”


Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price war

Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price warSaudi Arabia is taking unprecedented action in delaying the release of its international crude selling prices by five days, a senior Saudi source familiar with the matter said on Sunday, as the kingdom and other major producers seek to halt the free-fall in worldwide crude prices. A month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic, has cut the price of crude to $34 a barrel from $65.


Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar

Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soarThe measures aim to avert a major outbreak in its major cities but fall short of a lockdown.


Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank

Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bankAt least five children ate candy containing high THC doses after the Utah Food Bank distributed it as part of their food donations, police said.


A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up there

A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up thereThe Princess Cruises ship was one of several cruise ships stuck at sea seeking a port, and was turned away several times before reaching Miami.


Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month

Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month(Bloomberg) -- The deadly coronavirus may infect as many as 95,000 people in Indonesia by next month before easing, a minister said, as authorities ordered people to wear face masks to contain the pandemic.The dire forecast, which came as the country reported its biggest daily spike in confirmed cases, is based on a projection by the nation’s intelligence agency, University of Indonesia and Bandung Institute of Technology, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told lawmakers in Jakarta. The estimate was discussed at a cabinet meeting held by President Joko Widodo earlier on Monday, she said.Indonesia has seen a surge in infections in recent weeks after reporting its first cases only in early March. While the death toll from the pandemic at 209 is the highest in Asia after China, confirmed cases at 2,491 in a country of almost 270 million people is fewer than those reported in smaller countries such as Malaysia and the Philippines. Authorities reported 218 new Covid-19 cases on Monday. “The situation is very dynamic,” Indrawati said. “The government continues to monitor and take more steps as estimates show that the cases may peak in April and May.”Jokowi, as Widodo is known, has declared a national health emergency and ordered large scale social distancing to contain the spread of the virus that has infected almost 1.3 million people worldwide. On Monday, the president ordered authorities to ensure availability of face masks for every household as he appealed to citizens to cover their faces to contain the pandemic.The world’s fourth-most populous nation, along with India and the Philippines, could soon become the next Covid-19 hot spots given their large populations, weak health care infrastructure and social security net, according to Nomura Holdings Inc.Mortality RateThe highest mortality rate in Asia may signal the actual number of infections may be much higher than reported in Indonesia, reflecting a lack of Covid-19 testing capacity, Nomura said in a report last week. The country may eventually be forced to implement a complete lockdown in April and possibly for an extended period, Nomura said.The president has rejected calls to lock down cities and regions to fight the virus, saying such harsh steps would hurt the poor the most. But the surge in cases has overwhelmed the country’s health care system, with authorities struggling to procure enough personal protection equipment, hazmat suits and ventilators for medical workers.Some local administrations have sought permission to impose large scale social distancing measures under a new rule issued by the Health Ministry, Doni Monardo, chief of the government’s task force on coronavirus said Monday. The steps will allow police and other law enforcement agencies to take “measurable actions”, according to officials.Indonesia Slashes Growth Forecast by More Than Half on Virus The police will step up a crackdown on gathering of people across the archipelago to aid the government efforts to break the virus chain, national police spokesman Argo Yuwono said in a televised briefing Monday. Law enforcement agencies have also investigated more than a dozen cases of hoarding of food, masks and other essential supplies and price gouging, he said.Jokowi said a plan to release prisoners from the nation’s crowded jails should be limited to those serving terms for general crimes and not those convicted for corruption and other serious offenses. The president also ordered speedier reallocation of budget to tackle the health and economic impact of the pandemic, his office said in a statement.(Updates with latest coronavirus data in third paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Washington state returns ventilators for use in New York

Washington state returns ventilators for use in New YorkWashington Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that the state will return more than 400 ventilators of the 500 it has received from the federal government so they can go to New York and other states hit harder by the coronavirus. The Democratic governor said Sunday that his statewide stay-at-home order and weeks of social distancing have led to slower rates of infections and deaths in Washington. Washington state has 7,666 confirmed cases of the virus and 322 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday afternoon.


US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospital

US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospitalThe coronavirus threatened Americans with their hardest week in memory on Monday and put Britain's prime minister in hospital, despite early signs that some of Europe's hardest-hit countries may be turning a corner. Japan announced an imminent state of emergency and a trillion-dollar stimulus package, after the US surgeon general compared the likely impact of the epidemic in the week ahead to 9/11 or Pearl Harbor. In London, virus-stricken Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent the night in hospital for tests, after Queen Elizabeth II delivered a rare emergency address in a 68-year reign to urge Britain to "remain united and resolute".


'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisis

'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisisQueen Elizabeth II delivered a brief speech on Sunday during the growing coronavirus crisis.


Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus

Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not CoronavirusThe idea that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks—especially one who’s been rewarded for bad behavior—is particularly poignant when we consider President Trump’s firing Friday of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the Intelligence Community. Trump has a track record of firing and retaliating against officials who don’t blindly follow his orders and mimic his mood swings, no matter how unethical, illegal, dangerous, or irresponsible.At the same time, Trump has a track record of decimating our intelligence agencies. His history of insulting the intelligence community, cherry-picking intelligence to suit his personal narratives, prioritizing loyalty over experience, and rooting out anyone who speaks truth (a core mission of the intelligence community) that he doesn’t like have been the key themes underlining his relationship with the intelligence community.Plus, Trump has never supported oversight, unless of course it’s focused on Democrats. The impetus for Atkinson’s firing—namely his work to fulfill his statutory obligations to pass on what he judged to be an urgent and credible whistleblower complaint about the president’s call with Ukrainian President Zelensky—didn’t jibe with Trump’s personal desire to avoid oversight. Team Trump Stirs Up Completely Bogus Claim About WhistleblowerHis political cronies, House Republicans on the intelligence community, even started investigating Atkinson. The inspector general’s job is largely to detect fraud, waste, and mismanagement, not to be complicit in it. The IC IG’s mandate is to do so with integrity, professionalism, and independence. Atkinson fulfilled those responsibilities, and he was fired for doing so.But, Trump has largely escaped paying any price for his actions. The Republican Party for the most part has stayed silent about his degradation of intelligence and manipulation of oversight to shield himself.While Atkinson’s firing comes as no surprise in light of the president’s habitual misuse and abuse of the intelligence community, coupled with his disdain for oversight more broadly, it will have costs for U.S. national security today, tomorrow, and further down the road.The timing of Atkinson’s removal could not be worse. Trump’s decision to fire Atkinson in the midst of an unprecedented national crisis signals what his priorities are: his personal insecurity trumps national security. His need to settle a perceived vendetta and to remove someone who he perceives to have wronged him is putting additional pressure on an already strained IC. This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for the US government. The coronavirus crisis has introduced myriad new threats for the IC to analyze while concurrently straining resources as the workforce tries to protect itself through measures like social distancing, working from home, and shift work. This is not the time when the intelligence community needs any fewer competent officials on board. Nor is it the time to put more pressure on intelligence officials by introducing an unnecessary transition in IG leadership. That is a drain of resources as staff scramble to brief up the new acting IG. It’s undoubtedly a further blow to morale.And, Trump didn’t just fire Atkinson and allow him to serve out his statutorily outlined 30-day transition period. Atkinson reportedly didn’t know about his removal in advance and has now been placed on administration leave. The relevant statute requires that both intelligence committees be notified 30 days before the inspector general can be dismissed. By putting Atkinson on leave and not giving him the time to brief up his successor and transition his work there’s a real chance that someone drops the ball, somewhere, on critical work. But, then again, maybe that’s what the President is hoping for - that oversight is damaged. This may be an operational bonus for POTUS.An actual leader—a responsible president—would minimize pressure on the IC right now because they have critical national security work to do and cycling out one of the president’s perceived enemies doesn’t fall within that necessary for national security to do list. Atkinson’s removal is about retribution but it’s also about sending a message to the intel community at large and to everyone considering throwing their name in the mix as a nominee to fill Atkinson’s shoes. Trump’s letter to Congress regarding Atkinson’s firing noted that Atkinson no longer has his “fullest confidence.” However, there is no indication that Atkinson did not perform his job. In fact, the chairman of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency—an independent executive branch agency—and the IG of the Justice Department reacted to Atkinson’s removal in saying that “Inspector General Atkinson is known throughout the Inspector General community for his integrity, professionalism, and commitment to the rule of law and independent oversight.” Atkinson lost Trump’s confidence because he wouldn’t become a partisan tool when both as an IG and as a member of the intelligence community, objective, non-partisan work is part of the job description. Because of Trump’s actions, however, anyone considering taking the job will have to be willing not to uphold the law but to bend it to please POTUS.The broader and longer-term impact on recruitment and retention in the IC is that Trump has changed the cost benefit analysis associated with serving in the intelligence community right now. In the short term, at least, the IG’s office is hamstrung in its ability to fully function at a time when it is sorely needed for whistleblowers, for efficiency, and for oversight of critical intelligence-related issues impacting our national security, including coronavirus.Trump’s narcissism—his prioritization of self over country—is on full display. He’s never been known for his intelligence, but this latest move in a litany of dangerous behavior is going to cost us.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land borders

China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land bordersMainland China reported 39 new coronavirus cases as of Sunday, up from 30 a day earlier, and the number of asymptomatic cases also surged as the government vowed tighter controls at land borders. The National Health Commission said on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of Sunday, compared with 47 the day before. Imported cases and asymptomatic patients, who show no symptoms but can still pass the virus on, have become China's chief concern after draconian containment measures succeeded in slashing the overall infection rate.


Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understatedPublic health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said.There are many reasons why the numbers are underreported. Strict criteria in the beginning of the outbreak kept many people from getting tested for coronavirus, and it's still difficult to get tested in some areas, for example. There's also the matter of false negatives, and not all medical examiners have tests or believe they should conduct postmortem testing, even on people who died at home or in nursing homes where there were outbreaks. Experts also believe some February and early March deaths that were attributed to influenza or pneumonia were likely due to coronavirus.The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths. The Post, other media outlets, and university researchers update their numbers more frequently, with the Post reporting on Sunday night that 9,633 people have died from coronavirus in the U.S., and at least 337,000 cases have been confirmed.More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers

Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakersThe man attacked local officials with a scythe after they told him to wear a face mask, according to a police report.


Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.

Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon."We are suffering very much. It's a devastating pain," Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said on Sunday.


Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump

Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump(Bloomberg) -- Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is set to declare a state of emergency, media reports said, after coronavirus cases in Tokyo jumped over the weekend to top 1,000, raising worries of a more explosive surge.After last week saying the situation didn’t yet call for such a move, Abe changed course and will announce the plan as soon as Monday, media reports said. The formal declaration for the Tokyo area will be coming as early as Tuesday, the Yomiuri newspaper reported without attribution. The declaration could also cover the surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Saitama and Kanagawa, as well as Osaka, and be given a time limit of six months, broadcaster TBS said, citing sources close to the matter.The process for making the declaration picked up pace Monday, with Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura, who is handling the virus response, meeting Abe alongside the government’s top expert adviser on the pandemic. The premier may unveil his plan at a meeting of his virus task force after 6 p.m.The declaration could go into effect as Japan’s biggest-ever stimulus package worth 60 trillion yen ($550 billion) is set to be announced Tuesday.No LockdownThe state of emergency, which comes after pressure from local governors and the medical community, doesn’t enable a European-style lockdown.Declaring a state of emergency hands powers to local governments, including to urge residents to stay at home for a certain span of time during the emergency period. By contrast with some other countries though, there is no legal power to enforce such requests due to civil liberties protections in Japanese law.Abe’s government saw its approval rating slip to its lowest since October 2018 in a poll from broadcaster JNN released Monday with a majority of respondents faulting the way the government has managed the virus crisis. The poll taken April 4-5 showed that about 80% of respondents said the declaration should be made.The governors of Tokyo and Osaka have been pushing for the declaration as the recent spike in cases sparked concerns Japan is headed for a crisis on the levels seen in the U.S. and several countries in Europe.Japan was one of the first countries outside of the original epicenter in neighboring China to confirm a coronavirus infection and it has fared better than most, with about 3,650 reported cases as of Monday -- a jump from less than 500 just a month ago. That’s the lowest tally of any Group of Seven country, although Japan might be finding fewer mild cases because it has conducted a relatively small number of tests.Last week, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo advised American citizens who live in the U.S. but are currently in Japan to return home, “unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.” It added Japan’s low testing rate makes it hard to accurately assess the prevalence of the virus. The Japan Medical Association warned last week that the jump in cases in the nation’s most populous cities is putting more pressure on medical resources and that the government should declare a state of emergency.Tokyo reported 143 new coronavirus infections on Sunday, the largest number in a single day. It marked the second straight day the city’s daily infection tally exceeded 100.Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is already pressing residents to avoid unnecessary outings, and television showed many of the capital’s main shopping areas almost deserted over the weekend. The Tokyo local government is set to begin leasing hotels this week to accommodate mild cases, making room in its hospitals for the seriously ill.(Updates with media reports on area, time period)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled"If I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," said Grace Mitchell.


Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemic

Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemicRoughly 40 million black Americans are deciding whether to put their faith in government and the medical community during the coronavirus pandemic. Historic failures in government responses to disasters and emergencies, medical abuse, neglect and exploitation have jaded generations of black people into a distrust of some public institutions.


Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdown

Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdownFunke Akindele recently appeared in a public health video to raise awareness about coronavirus.


Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online convention

Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online conventionJoe Biden said Sunday that the Democratic National Convention, already delayed until August because of the coronavirus, may need to take place online as the pandemic continues to reshape the race for the White House. The party "may have to do a virtual convention,” the former vice president said. Biden has a commanding lead in the number of delegates needed to secure his party's presidential nomination at a convention in Milwaukee, originally scheduled for mid-July.


Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’

Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’Iranian health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur on Sunday criticized Chinese government statistics on the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, appearing to blame those statistics for other countries' slow response to the emerging pandemic."It seems statistics from China [were] a bitter joke, because many in the world thought this is just like influenza, with fewer deaths," Jahanpur said during a video conference in remarks translated by Radio Farda. "This [impression] were based on reports from China and now it seems China made a bitter joke with the rest of the world."Jahanpur added, "If in China they say an epidemic was controlled in two months, one should really think about it."The remarks caused a spat with Chinese officials, with China's ambassador to Iran saying the country should " show respect to the truths and great efforts of the people of China." Jahanpur took to Twitter to criticize Chinese statistics yet again, but subsequently offered praise of China, an ally of Iran."The support offered by China to the Iranian people in these trying times is unforgettable," Jahanpur wrote on Monday.While Iran has reported over 60,000 cases of coronavirus with more than 3,700 deaths as of Monday, U.S. officials believe the extent of the outbreak is much wider than the government has revealed. In late February, Iranian parliament members criticized their own government for concealing "horrific numbers" of deaths in the country.


Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official

Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: officialIran will never ask the United States for help in the fight against the new coronavirus, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has rejected offers from Washington for humanitarian assistance for Iran, the Middle Eastern country so far worst-affected by the coronavirus, with 3,739 deaths and 60,500 people infected according to the latest figures on Monday. "Iran has never asked and will not ask America to help Tehran in its fight against the outbreak ... But America should lift all its illegal unilateral sanctions on Iran," Mousavi said in a televised news conference.


Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve This

Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve ThisAs states around the U.S. scavenge for ventilators to treat the wave of critically ill coronavirus patients, doctors on the front lines are confronting not just the question of when they will get them, but when they should use them.The grim fact is that most people infected with COVID-19 who are sedated, intubated, and hooked up to a mechanical breathing machine will not survive. This is in part a function of just how sick they are when doctors finally resort to a ventilator, but also due in part to the damage ventilators cause to the lungs. The longer someone is on a ventilator, the lower the odds they will ever breathe again on their own.“It’s just a bridge to keep them going,” Marco Garrone, an emergency-medicine physician in Turin, Italy, told The Daily Beast. “It’s just a sort of last-ditch resort to buy time for them to heal... for the whole body to overcome the illness.”But unlike with some other respiratory diseases, there is no proven treatment for COVID-19. Doctors around the globe have reported survival numbers that show how difficult it is for an intubated patient to outrace the disease. Garrone and his colleagues say only 20 percent make it, while a London study found a slightly larger proportion.“These patients do extremely badly on mechanical vents,” Garrone said. At the same time, ventilators also represent the only hope for those whose oxygen levels continue to plunge—explaining why U.S. governors are so desperate to make sure they have enough.“You need ventilators, that’s for sure,” Garrone emphasized. “I agree 100 percent with what Gov. Cuomo said.”Trump Vows to Send Ventilators to Europe as U.S. Governors Plead for SuppliesThe challenge then is to find something less extreme than a ventilator to act as the bridge and buy patients the time they need to recover—a challenge that is all the more daunting given that doctors and researchers are still learning how the novel coronavirus behaves.“It is a brand-new disease,” Derek Angus, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a renowned authority on intensive care, told The Daily Beast. Before moving to a ventilator, Garrone often uses a mask to administer oxygen via continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP. He compared it to home CPAP machines used to keep open the airways of people with sleep apnea. “Exactly the same,” Garrone said. “Higher pressure.”He added, “I have a good number of people who did really well on CPAP. I’m not saying everybody fares well, [that] CPAP works with everyone. Start them on CPAP and try to keep them on CPAP as much as you can.”Another non-invasive option is a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers oxygen via a two-pronged tube fitted to the nose rather than via a mask as with CPAP. But both methods can potentially aerosolize virus particles, sending them into the air. That is not a threat to COVID-19 patients, but could constitute a considerable danger to those not infected with the disease, including health-care workers and first responders—especially those running short of personal protective equipment.In Kirkland, Washington, county health officials postulated that paramedics may have inadvertently furthered the spread of coronavirus when they employed CPAP machines to treat residents of the Life Care Center nursing home—where dozens eventually died.Angus said on a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) podcast last week that the jury is still out on whether the high-flow nasal cannula could pose a similar problem.“We have not worked out at this point exactly how safe that is,” he said.Further complicating the question of when to intubate is the deceptive and mercurial nature of COVID-19. A bad turn can come just as quickly as a new one.Greg Neyman, an emergency physician in New Jersey, has noted that COVID-19 patients can appear to be in little distress at oxygen levels that ordinarily would have people gasping for breath and maybe tearing off their air mask. Instead, COVID-19 patients can appear to be “just a little fluish.”“It’s something we’re not used to in emergency medicine and critical care,” Neyman told The Daily Beast.President Trump Insists New York Will Be ‘Fine,’ Won’t Need Extra VentilatorsThe coronavirus patient’s lungs continue to function mechanically. But even as they inhale and exhale, inflating and deflating their lungs, they can be hypoxic, or short of oxygen in the blood. The lungs may work, but the oxygen does not reach them.  And there is a concern that an exhausted and overwhelmed medical staff might fail to note ongoing labored breathing. “How safely can we use non-invasive ventilation?” Angus asked the JAMA podcast. “It would be terrible if [a patient] had acute respiratory failure without someone able to get to the bedside and intubate.”Because COVID-19 can worsen so precipitously, doctors may have only a small window in which to make the decision to intubate.When the time comes, Garrone asks the patient—who is generally still conscious and cognizant—for verbal consent before inducing a coma from which they have a painfully low chance of emerging.“I don’t think they are aware of how the odds are against them and it would be very harsh of us, almost cruel, to tell them,” Garrone told The Daily Beast. “Besides, when they are proposed with intubation there is really no other reasonable course of action left.”Doctors are trying to figure out new courses of action in real time, as their ICUs fill up and their ventilator supplies run low. Researchers are racing to analyze the outcomes to better inform the decision-making process.“We don’t know enough yet,” said Angus. “We want more data.”He offered a comparison of the fight we face with brand new COVID-19.“Trench warfare in the First World War,” he said.But in truth, the life-and-death decisions on the battlefield were simple compared to those faced by ICU doctors. Even when hospitals have enough ventilators.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'

Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'Aides have become 'increasingly worried' about prime minister Boris Johnson's health after he tested positive for the coronavirus.


What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?

What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to announce a state of emergency as soon as Tuesday in several parts of the country, including Tokyo, where coronavirus infections are spiking. The declaration is not nationwide. Abe said Monday it would cover Tokyo, as well as neighbouring Chiba, Kanagawa and Saitama, the western hub of Osaka and neighbouring Hyogo, as well as the southwestern region of Fukuoka.


Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'

Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued some dire warnings since the early days of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus, but on Sunday he indicated some steps taken by the U.S. federal government and states might be paying off -- both in terms of curbing the spread and preparing the health-care system for an onslaught of patients.New York City remains the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, and its hospitals are struggling. Gottlieb reiterated the predication made by numerous officials that the city, and New York state, are on the verge of peaking next week, which will undoubtedly stretch the health-care system thin. But he said he, ultimately, he thinks there will be enough ventilators for severe COVID-19 patients thanks to a historic effort to expand their supply, preventing New York from going past its tipping point.> The New York healthcare system "will be right on the brink" \- strained - "but won't go over" @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan . He adds, "I don't think they will run out of ventilators." pic.twitter.com/AhnAanf4rN> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020As for the rest of the country, Gottlieb believes mitigation efforts like social distancing are "clearly working," as case rates slow in northern states, though he's concerned the next set of hot spots will be in the South. > "Mitigation is clearly working," @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan, but notes that states in the Sunbelt - across the south - are going to be the next hotspots in the United States. pic.twitter.com/wD4q1Z5yUf> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judge

1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judgePatrick Jones "spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him," one of his former lawyers said.


Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby Princess

Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby PrincessPassengers from the Ruby Princess disembarked in Sydney without knowing the coronavirus was on board.


Puerto Rico discovers protective supply cache amid COVID-19
Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacy

Trump's imprint on federal courts could be his enduring legacySince assuming office in January 2017, Mr. Trump has appointed 193 judges to the federal bench, a staggering figure with few recent precedents.


Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlook

Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlookGlobal benchmark oil prices traded as much as $3 a barrel lower as the market opened for Monday's trading session, reflecting fears of oversupply after Saudi Arabia and Russia postponed to Thursday a meeting about a potential pact to cut production. Late last week, prices had surged, with both U.S. and Brent contracts posting their largest weekly percentage gains on record due to hopes that OPEC and its allies would strike a global deal to cut crude supply worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus has cut demand and a month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia has left the market awash in crude.


During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health Workers

During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health WorkersAs hospitals across the country brace for an onslaught of coronavirus patients, doctors, nurses and other health care workers -- even in emerging hot spots -- are being furloughed, reassigned or told they must take pay cuts.The job cuts, which stretch from Massachusetts to Nevada, are a new and possibly urgent problem for a business-oriented health care system whose hospitals must earn revenue even in a national crisis. Hospitals large and small have canceled many elective services -- often under state government orders -- as they prepare for the virus, sending revenues plummeting.That has left trained health care workers sidelined, even in areas around Detroit and Washington, where infection rates are climbing, and even as hard-hit hospitals are pleading for help."I'm 46. I've never been on unemployment in my life," said Casey Cox, who three weeks ago worked two jobs, one conducting sleep research at the University of Michigan and another as a technician at the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Hospital near Ann Arbor, Michigan. Within a week, he had lost both.Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York has begged doctors and other medical workers from around the country to come to the city to help in areas where the coronavirus is overwhelming hospitals."Unless there is a national effort to enlist doctors, nurses, hospital workers of all kinds and get them where they are needed most in the country in time, I don't see, honestly, how we're going to have the professionals we need to get through this crisis," de Blasio said Friday morning on MSNBC.And the Department of Veterans Affairs is scrambling to hire health care workers for its government-run hospitals, especially in hard-hit New Orleans and Detroit, where many staff members have fallen ill. The department moved to get a federal waiver to hire retired medical workers to beef up staff levels.But even as some hospitals are straining to handle the influx of coronavirus patients, empty hospital beds elsewhere carry their own burden."We're in trouble," said Gene Morreale, the chief executive of Oneida Health Hospital in upstate New York, which has not yet seen a surge in coronavirus patients.Governors in dozens of states have delivered executive orders or guidelines directing hospitals to stop nonurgent procedures and surgeries to various degrees. Last month, the U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome M. Adams, also implored hospitals to halt elective procedures.That has left many health systems struggling to survive.Next week, Morreale said, Oneida will announce that it is putting 25% to 30% of its employees on involuntary furlough. They will have access to their health insurance through June. Physicians and senior staff at the hospital have taken a 20% pay cut."We've been here 121 years, and I'm hoping we're still there on the other side of this," Morreale said.Appalachian Regional Healthcare, a 13-hospital system in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, has seen a 30% decrease in its overall business because of a decline in patient volume and services related to the pandemic. Last week, the hospital system announced it would furlough about 8% of its workforce -- around 500 employees.Hospital executives across the country are cutting pay while also trying to repurpose employees for other jobs.At Intermountain Healthcare, which operates 215 clinics and 24 hospitals in Utah, Idaho and Nevada, about 600 of the 2,600 physicians, physicians assistants and registered nurses who are compensated based on volume will see their pay dip by about 15%, said Daron Cowley, a company spokesman.Those reductions are tied to the drop in procedures, which has fallen significantly for some specialties, he said. The organization is working to preserve employment as much as possible, in part by trying to deploy 3,000 staff members into new roles."You have an endoscopy tech right now that may be deployed to be at hospital entrances" where they would take the temperatures of people coming in, Cowley explained.In Boston, a spokesman for Partners HealthCare, with 12 hospitals, including Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's, said staff members whose work has decreased are being deployed to other areas or will be paid for up to eight weeks if no work is available.But redeployment is not always an option. Janet Conway, a spokeswoman for Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said many of the company's operating room nurses trained in specialized procedures have been furloughed because their training did not translate to other roles."Those OR nurses, many have never worked as a floor nurse," she said.Conway said nearly 300 furloughed staff members have the option to use their paid time off, but beyond that, the furlough would be unpaid. Most employees are afforded 25 days per year.Some furloughed hospital workers are likely to be asked to return as the number of coronavirus cases rise in their communities. But the unpredictable virus has offered little clarity and left hospitals, like much of the economy, in a free fall.Many health systems are making direct cuts to their payrolls, eliminating or shrinking performance bonuses and prorating paychecks to mirror reduced workload until operations stabilize.Scott Weavil, a lawyer in California who counsels physicians and other health care workers on employment contracts, said he was hearing from doctors across the country who were being asked to take pay cuts of 20% to 70%.The requests are coming from hospital administrators or private physician groups hired by the hospitals, he said, and are essentially new contracts that doctors are being asked to sign.Many of the contracts do not say when the cuts might end, and are mostly affecting doctors who are not treating coronavirus patients on the front lines, such as urologists, rheumatologists, bariatric surgeons, obstetricians and gynecologists.Such doctors are still being asked to work -- often in a decreased capacity -- yet may be risking their health going into hospitals and clinics."It's just not sitting well," Weavil said, noting that he tells doctors they unfortunately have few options if they want to work for their institution long term."If you fight this pay cut, administration could write your name down and remember that forever," he said he tells them.In other cases, physicians are continuing to find opportunities to practice in a more limited capacity, like telemedicine appointments. But that has not eliminated steep pay cuts."Physicians are only paid in our clinic based on their productivity in the work they do," said Dr. Pam Cutler, the president of Western Montana Clinic in Missoula. "So they're automatically taking a very significant -- usually greater than 50% or 25% -- pay cut just because they don't have any work."In some areas, layoffs have left behind health care workers who worry that they will not be able to find new roles or redeploy their skills.Cox in Michigan said he was briefly reassigned at his hospital, helping screen and process patients coming in with coronavirus symptoms, but eventually the people seeking reassignments outgrew the number of roles.He also expressed concern that inevitable changes in the health care industry after the pandemic -- paired with the possibility of a lengthy period of unemployment -- could make it difficult to get his job back."I'm just concerned that the job I got laid off from may not be there when this is over," Cox said. "The longer you're away, the more you worry, 'Am I going to be able to come back?' So there's a lot of anxiety about it."Even as many of the largest hospital networks grapple with sudden financial uncertainty, much smaller practices and clinics face a more immediate threat.According to a statistical model produced by HealthLandscape and the American Academy of Family Physicians, by the end of April, nearly 20,000 family physicians could be fully out of work, underemployed or reassigned elsewhere, particularly as cities like New York consider large-scale, emergency reassignments of physicians."Many of these smaller practices were living on a financial edge to start with, so they're not entering into this in a good position at all," said Dr. Gary Price, the president of the Physicians Foundation. "Their margins are narrower, their patients don't want to come in, and many of them shouldn't anyway, so their cash flow has been severely impacted and their overhead really hasn't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdownTrump repeated a favorite refrain of some conservatives, who have said that the coronavirus “cure”—that is, a nationwide shutdown—cannot be worse than the disease itself.


Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News ExplainsCoronavirus patients are showing a wide range of symptoms and the exact reason why is still a mystery — but we do have some clues as to what factors can influence the severity of the disease.


Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-ed

Theodore Roosevelt's great-grandson calls fired Navy Capt. Crozier 'a hero' in op-edTweed Roosevelt, in a New York Times op-ed, said his great-grandfather would have done the same thing as Crozier.


Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital

Britain in crisis: Queen delivers rare rallying cry as prime minister sent to hospital“We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,” the queen said, echoing a World War II-era song.


3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.

3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.Lockdown measures in Italy, Spain and France appear to be bearing fruit after three weeks, with daily death tolls beginning to decline.


'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.

'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.A doctor treating COVID-19 patients sits down with her husband to make a will.


U.K. Virus Deaths Slow as Government Mulls Tighter Lockdown
Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisis

Blame the Chinese Communist Party for the coronavirus crisisCoronavirus crisis proves communism is still a grave threat to the entire world. If Beijing had just been honest, the pandemic could be preventable.


Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugees

Malaysia detains boatload of 202 presumed Rohingya refugeesMalaysian authorities said they have arrested a boatload of 202 people believed to be minority Muslim Rohingya refugees after their boat was found adrift Sunday morning near the northern resort island of Langkawi. A Northern District maritime official, Capt. Zulinda Ramly, said the refugees included 152 men, 45 women and five children. Zulinda said maritime officials have taken precautionary measures to prevent any possible transmission of the COVID-19 virus while handling the group.


Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?

Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?While the term “warfare” is a useful metaphor for the kind of mobilization necessary to save lives in this crisis, it’s not a useful way to think about the primary responsibility of ordinary citizens right now, which is to stay at home.


Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDP

Japan's Abe unveils 'massive' coronavirus stimulus worth 20% of GDPJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged on Monday to roll out an unprecedented economic stimulus package, equal to 20% of economic output, as his government vowed to take "all steps" to battle deepening fallout from the coronavirus. The package, to be confirmed by the cabinet on Tuesday, will total 108 trillion yen ($989 billion), far exceeding one compiled in the wake of the 2009 financial crisis totalling 56 trillion yen in size, with fiscal spending of 15 trillion yen. "We decided to carry out an unprecedentedly massive scale of economic package worth 108 trillion yen, or 20% of GDP, following the immense damage to the economy from the novel coronavirus," Abe told reporters after a meeting with senior ruling party lawmakers.


Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19

Coronavirus: Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for Covid-19The Bronx Zoo in New York says this case of human-to-animal transmission appears to be unique.


U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come

U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come"It's going to be the hardest moment for many Americans in their entire lives," Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on MSNBC's Meet the Press.


An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears

An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fearsExperts predicted the stresses of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns could lead to an uptick in domestic violence.


Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsens

Some hospitals temporarily cutting staff as coronavirus crisis worsensWith most elective surgeries cancelled during the pandemic, hospitals experiencing revenue loss are furloughing staff members in the middle of the pandemic


‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic Drowning

‘My Everything’: Husband of Robert F. Kennedy’s Granddaughter Recounts Tragic DrowningMaeve Kennedy Townsend McKean’s husband has posted a heartbreaking tribute to his wife—the granddaughter of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy—and the couple’s child, who went missing in the Chesapeake Bay Thursday afternoon.The Kennedy family announced Friday that the Coast Guard suspended the rescue effort for McKean, 40, and son Gideon, 8, who disappeared after paddling a canoe out into the bay. The effort to recover their remains is ongoing.“The search that began yesterday afternoon went on throughout the night and continued all day today,” McKean’s husband, David McKean, wrote in a Facebook post late Friday. “It is now dark again. It has been more than 24 hours, and the chances they have survived are impossibly small. It is clear that Maeve and Gideon have passed away.”The family had been self-quarantining from the novel coronavirus in a house on the bay owned by McKean’s mother, former Maryland Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, according to her husband’s post. The largely empty house provided them with more space to ride out the pandemic than their D.C. home, he said.McKean and her son were playing on a beach in a small, shallow cove behind the house at around 4 p.m. when one of them accidentally kicked a ball into the water. The two attempted to retrieve the ball by paddling a canoe into the protected cove, but ended up in the open bay where strong winds during the day had whipped up vicious currents.“The cove is protected, with much calmer wind and water than in the greater Chesapeake,” David McKean wrote. “They got into a canoe, intending simply to retrieve the ball, and somehow got pushed by wind or tide into the open bay.”About 30 minutes later, an onlooker called emergency services to report seeing the pair struggling to paddle to the shore. That was the last anyone saw of them. The Coast Guard recovered their capsized canoe miles away from the beach at 7 p.m. Friday.David McKean wrote tenderly of his late son, recalling his love of sports and strong morals.“He was deeply compassionate, declining to sing children’s songs if they contained a hint of animals or people being treated cruelly,” he wrote. “And he was brave, leading his friends in games, standing up to people who he thought were wrong (including his parents), and relishing opportunities to go on adventures with friends, even those he’d just met.”“I used to marvel at him as a toddler and worry that he was too perfect to exist in this world,” he added. “It seems to me now that he was.”His wife, McKean wrote, was “magical,” with “endless energy” and a laugh you could hear a block away.“Maeve turned 40 in November, and she was my everything,” he wrote. “She was my best friend and my soulmate. I have already thought many times over today that I need to remember to tell Maeve about something that’s happening. I am terrified by the idea that this will fade over time.”The couple met while working for Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and were married in 2003. Maeve served in the Peace Corp, with the State Department’s global AIDS program, and in the Obama administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, before signing on as executive director of the Georgetown University Global Health Initiative.“Maeve was vivid,” her mother, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, said in a statement Friday night. “You always knew when she was in a room. Her laughter was loud, unabashed and infectious.” McKean’s cousin, Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), posted on Twitter: “We love you Maeve. We love you Gideon. Our family has lost two of the brightest lights.”McKean is survived by her 7-year-old daughter, Gabriella, and 2-year-old son, Toby. “I know soon he will start to ask for Maeve and Gideon,” her husband wrote of Toby. “It breaks my heart that he will not get to have them as a mother and brother.”In his Facebook post, David McKean asked friends and family to share photos of his late wife and son.“As Gabriella and Toby lay sleeping next to me last night, I promised them that I would do my best to be the parent that Maeve was, and to be the person that Gideon clearly would have grown up to be,” he wrote. “Part of that is keeping their memories alive.”The Kennedy family has endured an extraordinary amount of tragedy over several generations, from the high-profile assassinations of McKean’s grandfather and great-uncle to the fatal plane crash that killed John F. Kennedy Jr., to the heart attack that killed Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s niece, Kara, in 2011 and the death by suicide of his ex-wife, Mary, in 2012.Just last year, McKean’s cousin, Saoirse Roisin Kennedy Hill, died of an accidental drug overdose at the Kennedy family compound in Cape Cod.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers

Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippersThe largest maritime operation ever undertaken in Sydney Harbour was completed on Sunday with the successful restocking and refuelling of five cruise ships, Australian police said. It was part of government efforts since mid-March to force vessels to leave the country's waters to prevent any further spread of the coronavirus in Australia. Cruise ship guests have so far accounted for almost 10 percent of Australia's more than 5,500 infections.


Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.


Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirusJust a little over a month after saying there was no need for the community at large to wear masks in public, the CDC has changed its mind, recommending that all Americans should wear some sort of face covering when venturing outside.


Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly

Atkinson: Trump fired me because I handled whistleblower complaint properly“As an Inspector General, I was legally obligated to ensure that whistleblowers had an effective and authorized means to disclose urgent matter.”


Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price war

Saudi Arabia delays setting May prices, looks to OPEC meeting to settle price warSaudi Arabia is taking unprecedented action in delaying the release of its international crude selling prices by five days, a senior Saudi source familiar with the matter said on Sunday, as the kingdom and other major producers seek to halt the free-fall in worldwide crude prices. A month-long price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic, has cut the price of crude to $34 a barrel from $65.


Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar

Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soarThe measures aim to avert a major outbreak in its major cities but fall short of a lockdown.


Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank

Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bankAt least five children ate candy containing high THC doses after the Utah Food Bank distributed it as part of their food donations, police said.


A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up there

A cruise ship with two coronavirus deaths and at least 12 infections just docked in Miami — take a look at how it ended up thereThe Princess Cruises ship was one of several cruise ships stuck at sea seeking a port, and was turned away several times before reaching Miami.


Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month

Indonesia Virus Cases Seen Soaring to 95,000 by Next Month(Bloomberg) -- The deadly coronavirus may infect as many as 95,000 people in Indonesia by next month before easing, a minister said, as authorities ordered people to wear face masks to contain the pandemic.The dire forecast, which came as the country reported its biggest daily spike in confirmed cases, is based on a projection by the nation’s intelligence agency, University of Indonesia and Bandung Institute of Technology, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati told lawmakers in Jakarta. The estimate was discussed at a cabinet meeting held by President Joko Widodo earlier on Monday, she said.Indonesia has seen a surge in infections in recent weeks after reporting its first cases only in early March. While the death toll from the pandemic at 209 is the highest in Asia after China, confirmed cases at 2,491 in a country of almost 270 million people is fewer than those reported in smaller countries such as Malaysia and the Philippines. Authorities reported 218 new Covid-19 cases on Monday. “The situation is very dynamic,” Indrawati said. “The government continues to monitor and take more steps as estimates show that the cases may peak in April and May.”Jokowi, as Widodo is known, has declared a national health emergency and ordered large scale social distancing to contain the spread of the virus that has infected almost 1.3 million people worldwide. On Monday, the president ordered authorities to ensure availability of face masks for every household as he appealed to citizens to cover their faces to contain the pandemic.The world’s fourth-most populous nation, along with India and the Philippines, could soon become the next Covid-19 hot spots given their large populations, weak health care infrastructure and social security net, according to Nomura Holdings Inc.Mortality RateThe highest mortality rate in Asia may signal the actual number of infections may be much higher than reported in Indonesia, reflecting a lack of Covid-19 testing capacity, Nomura said in a report last week. The country may eventually be forced to implement a complete lockdown in April and possibly for an extended period, Nomura said.The president has rejected calls to lock down cities and regions to fight the virus, saying such harsh steps would hurt the poor the most. But the surge in cases has overwhelmed the country’s health care system, with authorities struggling to procure enough personal protection equipment, hazmat suits and ventilators for medical workers.Some local administrations have sought permission to impose large scale social distancing measures under a new rule issued by the Health Ministry, Doni Monardo, chief of the government’s task force on coronavirus said Monday. The steps will allow police and other law enforcement agencies to take “measurable actions”, according to officials.Indonesia Slashes Growth Forecast by More Than Half on Virus The police will step up a crackdown on gathering of people across the archipelago to aid the government efforts to break the virus chain, national police spokesman Argo Yuwono said in a televised briefing Monday. Law enforcement agencies have also investigated more than a dozen cases of hoarding of food, masks and other essential supplies and price gouging, he said.Jokowi said a plan to release prisoners from the nation’s crowded jails should be limited to those serving terms for general crimes and not those convicted for corruption and other serious offenses. The president also ordered speedier reallocation of budget to tackle the health and economic impact of the pandemic, his office said in a statement.(Updates with latest coronavirus data in third paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Washington state returns ventilators for use in New York

Washington state returns ventilators for use in New YorkWashington Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that the state will return more than 400 ventilators of the 500 it has received from the federal government so they can go to New York and other states hit harder by the coronavirus. The Democratic governor said Sunday that his statewide stay-at-home order and weeks of social distancing have led to slower rates of infections and deaths in Washington. Washington state has 7,666 confirmed cases of the virus and 322 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday afternoon.


US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospital

US braced for historic blow, as virus lands British PM in hospitalThe coronavirus threatened Americans with their hardest week in memory on Monday and put Britain's prime minister in hospital, despite early signs that some of Europe's hardest-hit countries may be turning a corner. Japan announced an imminent state of emergency and a trillion-dollar stimulus package, after the US surgeon general compared the likely impact of the epidemic in the week ahead to 9/11 or Pearl Harbor. In London, virus-stricken Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent the night in hospital for tests, after Queen Elizabeth II delivered a rare emergency address in a 68-year reign to urge Britain to "remain united and resolute".


'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisis

'Together we are tackling this disease’: Queen Elizabeth II delivers speech during coronavirus crisisQueen Elizabeth II delivered a brief speech on Sunday during the growing coronavirus crisis.


Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus

Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not CoronavirusThe idea that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks—especially one who’s been rewarded for bad behavior—is particularly poignant when we consider President Trump’s firing Friday of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the Intelligence Community. Trump has a track record of firing and retaliating against officials who don’t blindly follow his orders and mimic his mood swings, no matter how unethical, illegal, dangerous, or irresponsible.At the same time, Trump has a track record of decimating our intelligence agencies. His history of insulting the intelligence community, cherry-picking intelligence to suit his personal narratives, prioritizing loyalty over experience, and rooting out anyone who speaks truth (a core mission of the intelligence community) that he doesn’t like have been the key themes underlining his relationship with the intelligence community.Plus, Trump has never supported oversight, unless of course it’s focused on Democrats. The impetus for Atkinson’s firing—namely his work to fulfill his statutory obligations to pass on what he judged to be an urgent and credible whistleblower complaint about the president’s call with Ukrainian President Zelensky—didn’t jibe with Trump’s personal desire to avoid oversight. Team Trump Stirs Up Completely Bogus Claim About WhistleblowerHis political cronies, House Republicans on the intelligence community, even started investigating Atkinson. The inspector general’s job is largely to detect fraud, waste, and mismanagement, not to be complicit in it. The IC IG’s mandate is to do so with integrity, professionalism, and independence. Atkinson fulfilled those responsibilities, and he was fired for doing so.But, Trump has largely escaped paying any price for his actions. The Republican Party for the most part has stayed silent about his degradation of intelligence and manipulation of oversight to shield himself.While Atkinson’s firing comes as no surprise in light of the president’s habitual misuse and abuse of the intelligence community, coupled with his disdain for oversight more broadly, it will have costs for U.S. national security today, tomorrow, and further down the road.The timing of Atkinson’s removal could not be worse. Trump’s decision to fire Atkinson in the midst of an unprecedented national crisis signals what his priorities are: his personal insecurity trumps national security. His need to settle a perceived vendetta and to remove someone who he perceives to have wronged him is putting additional pressure on an already strained IC. This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for the US government. The coronavirus crisis has introduced myriad new threats for the IC to analyze while concurrently straining resources as the workforce tries to protect itself through measures like social distancing, working from home, and shift work. This is not the time when the intelligence community needs any fewer competent officials on board. Nor is it the time to put more pressure on intelligence officials by introducing an unnecessary transition in IG leadership. That is a drain of resources as staff scramble to brief up the new acting IG. It’s undoubtedly a further blow to morale.And, Trump didn’t just fire Atkinson and allow him to serve out his statutorily outlined 30-day transition period. Atkinson reportedly didn’t know about his removal in advance and has now been placed on administration leave. The relevant statute requires that both intelligence committees be notified 30 days before the inspector general can be dismissed. By putting Atkinson on leave and not giving him the time to brief up his successor and transition his work there’s a real chance that someone drops the ball, somewhere, on critical work. But, then again, maybe that’s what the President is hoping for - that oversight is damaged. This may be an operational bonus for POTUS.An actual leader—a responsible president—would minimize pressure on the IC right now because they have critical national security work to do and cycling out one of the president’s perceived enemies doesn’t fall within that necessary for national security to do list. Atkinson’s removal is about retribution but it’s also about sending a message to the intel community at large and to everyone considering throwing their name in the mix as a nominee to fill Atkinson’s shoes. Trump’s letter to Congress regarding Atkinson’s firing noted that Atkinson no longer has his “fullest confidence.” However, there is no indication that Atkinson did not perform his job. In fact, the chairman of the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency—an independent executive branch agency—and the IG of the Justice Department reacted to Atkinson’s removal in saying that “Inspector General Atkinson is known throughout the Inspector General community for his integrity, professionalism, and commitment to the rule of law and independent oversight.” Atkinson lost Trump’s confidence because he wouldn’t become a partisan tool when both as an IG and as a member of the intelligence community, objective, non-partisan work is part of the job description. Because of Trump’s actions, however, anyone considering taking the job will have to be willing not to uphold the law but to bend it to please POTUS.The broader and longer-term impact on recruitment and retention in the IC is that Trump has changed the cost benefit analysis associated with serving in the intelligence community right now. In the short term, at least, the IG’s office is hamstrung in its ability to fully function at a time when it is sorely needed for whistleblowers, for efficiency, and for oversight of critical intelligence-related issues impacting our national security, including coronavirus.Trump’s narcissism—his prioritization of self over country—is on full display. He’s never been known for his intelligence, but this latest move in a litany of dangerous behavior is going to cost us.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land borders

China sees rise in asymptomatic coronavirus cases, to tighten controls at land bordersMainland China reported 39 new coronavirus cases as of Sunday, up from 30 a day earlier, and the number of asymptomatic cases also surged as the government vowed tighter controls at land borders. The National Health Commission said on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of Sunday, compared with 47 the day before. Imported cases and asymptomatic patients, who show no symptoms but can still pass the virus on, have become China's chief concern after draconian containment measures succeeded in slashing the overall infection rate.


Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understatedPublic health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said.There are many reasons why the numbers are underreported. Strict criteria in the beginning of the outbreak kept many people from getting tested for coronavirus, and it's still difficult to get tested in some areas, for example. There's also the matter of false negatives, and not all medical examiners have tests or believe they should conduct postmortem testing, even on people who died at home or in nursing homes where there were outbreaks. Experts also believe some February and early March deaths that were attributed to influenza or pneumonia were likely due to coronavirus.The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths. The Post, other media outlets, and university researchers update their numbers more frequently, with the Post reporting on Sunday night that 9,633 people have died from coronavirus in the U.S., and at least 337,000 cases have been confirmed.More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers

Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakersThe man attacked local officials with a scythe after they told him to wear a face mask, according to a police report.


Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.

Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon."We are suffering very much. It's a devastating pain," Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said on Sunday.


Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump

Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump(Bloomberg) -- Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is set to declare a state of emergency, media reports said, after coronavirus cases in Tokyo jumped over the weekend to top 1,000, raising worries of a more explosive surge.After last week saying the situation didn’t yet call for such a move, Abe changed course and will announce the plan as soon as Monday, media reports said. The formal declaration for the Tokyo area will be coming as early as Tuesday, the Yomiuri newspaper reported without attribution. The declaration could also cover the surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Saitama and Kanagawa, as well as Osaka, and be given a time limit of six months, broadcaster TBS said, citing sources close to the matter.The process for making the declaration picked up pace Monday, with Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura, who is handling the virus response, meeting Abe alongside the government’s top expert adviser on the pandemic. The premier may unveil his plan at a meeting of his virus task force after 6 p.m.The declaration could go into effect as Japan’s biggest-ever stimulus package worth 60 trillion yen ($550 billion) is set to be announced Tuesday.No LockdownThe state of emergency, which comes after pressure from local governors and the medical community, doesn’t enable a European-style lockdown.Declaring a state of emergency hands powers to local governments, including to urge residents to stay at home for a certain span of time during the emergency period. By contrast with some other countries though, there is no legal power to enforce such requests due to civil liberties protections in Japanese law.Abe’s government saw its approval rating slip to its lowest since October 2018 in a poll from broadcaster JNN released Monday with a majority of respondents faulting the way the government has managed the virus crisis. The poll taken April 4-5 showed that about 80% of respondents said the declaration should be made.The governors of Tokyo and Osaka have been pushing for the declaration as the recent spike in cases sparked concerns Japan is headed for a crisis on the levels seen in the U.S. and several countries in Europe.Japan was one of the first countries outside of the original epicenter in neighboring China to confirm a coronavirus infection and it has fared better than most, with about 3,650 reported cases as of Monday -- a jump from less than 500 just a month ago. That’s the lowest tally of any Group of Seven country, although Japan might be finding fewer mild cases because it has conducted a relatively small number of tests.Last week, the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo advised American citizens who live in the U.S. but are currently in Japan to return home, “unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.” It added Japan’s low testing rate makes it hard to accurately assess the prevalence of the virus. The Japan Medical Association warned last week that the jump in cases in the nation’s most populous cities is putting more pressure on medical resources and that the government should declare a state of emergency.Tokyo reported 143 new coronavirus infections on Sunday, the largest number in a single day. It marked the second straight day the city’s daily infection tally exceeded 100.Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is already pressing residents to avoid unnecessary outings, and television showed many of the capital’s main shopping areas almost deserted over the weekend. The Tokyo local government is set to begin leasing hotels this week to accommodate mild cases, making room in its hospitals for the seriously ill.(Updates with media reports on area, time period)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled"If I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," said Grace Mitchell.


Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemic

Black mistrust of medicine looms amid coronavirus pandemicRoughly 40 million black Americans are deciding whether to put their faith in government and the medical community during the coronavirus pandemic. Historic failures in government responses to disasters and emergencies, medical abuse, neglect and exploitation have jaded generations of black people into a distrust of some public institutions.


Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdown

Coronavirus: Nigerian actress Funke Akindele under fire for Lagos party amid lockdownFunke Akindele recently appeared in a public health video to raise awareness about coronavirus.


Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online convention

Biden raises idea of Democrats holding an online conventionJoe Biden said Sunday that the Democratic National Convention, already delayed until August because of the coronavirus, may need to take place online as the pandemic continues to reshape the race for the White House. The party "may have to do a virtual convention,” the former vice president said. Biden has a commanding lead in the number of delegates needed to secure his party's presidential nomination at a convention in Milwaukee, originally scheduled for mid-July.


Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’

Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’Iranian health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur on Sunday criticized Chinese government statistics on the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, appearing to blame those statistics for other countries' slow response to the emerging pandemic."It seems statistics from China [were] a bitter joke, because many in the world thought this is just like influenza, with fewer deaths," Jahanpur said during a video conference in remarks translated by Radio Farda. "This [impression] were based on reports from China and now it seems China made a bitter joke with the rest of the world."Jahanpur added, "If in China they say an epidemic was controlled in two months, one should really think about it."The remarks caused a spat with Chinese officials, with China's ambassador to Iran saying the country should " show respect to the truths and great efforts of the people of China." Jahanpur took to Twitter to criticize Chinese statistics yet again, but subsequently offered praise of China, an ally of Iran."The support offered by China to the Iranian people in these trying times is unforgettable," Jahanpur wrote on Monday.While Iran has reported over 60,000 cases of coronavirus with more than 3,700 deaths as of Monday, U.S. officials believe the extent of the outbreak is much wider than the government has revealed. In late February, Iranian parliament members criticized their own government for concealing "horrific numbers" of deaths in the country.


Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official

Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: officialIran will never ask the United States for help in the fight against the new coronavirus, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has rejected offers from Washington for humanitarian assistance for Iran, the Middle Eastern country so far worst-affected by the coronavirus, with 3,739 deaths and 60,500 people infected according to the latest figures on Monday. "Iran has never asked and will not ask America to help Tehran in its fight against the outbreak ... But America should lift all its illegal unilateral sanctions on Iran," Mousavi said in a televised news conference.


Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve This

Why All the Ventilators in the World Won’t Solve ThisAs states around the U.S. scavenge for ventilators to treat the wave of critically ill coronavirus patients, doctors on the front lines are confronting not just the question of when they will get them, but when they should use them.The grim fact is that most people infected with COVID-19 who are sedated, intubated, and hooked up to a mechanical breathing machine will not survive. This is in part a function of just how sick they are when doctors finally resort to a ventilator, but also due in part to the damage ventilators cause to the lungs. The longer someone is on a ventilator, the lower the odds they will ever breathe again on their own.“It’s just a bridge to keep them going,” Marco Garrone, an emergency-medicine physician in Turin, Italy, told The Daily Beast. “It’s just a sort of last-ditch resort to buy time for them to heal... for the whole body to overcome the illness.”But unlike with some other respiratory diseases, there is no proven treatment for COVID-19. Doctors around the globe have reported survival numbers that show how difficult it is for an intubated patient to outrace the disease. Garrone and his colleagues say only 20 percent make it, while a London study found a slightly larger proportion.“These patients do extremely badly on mechanical vents,” Garrone said. At the same time, ventilators also represent the only hope for those whose oxygen levels continue to plunge—explaining why U.S. governors are so desperate to make sure they have enough.“You need ventilators, that’s for sure,” Garrone emphasized. “I agree 100 percent with what Gov. Cuomo said.”Trump Vows to Send Ventilators to Europe as U.S. Governors Plead for SuppliesThe challenge then is to find something less extreme than a ventilator to act as the bridge and buy patients the time they need to recover—a challenge that is all the more daunting given that doctors and researchers are still learning how the novel coronavirus behaves.“It is a brand-new disease,” Derek Angus, of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a renowned authority on intensive care, told The Daily Beast. Before moving to a ventilator, Garrone often uses a mask to administer oxygen via continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP. He compared it to home CPAP machines used to keep open the airways of people with sleep apnea. “Exactly the same,” Garrone said. “Higher pressure.”He added, “I have a good number of people who did really well on CPAP. I’m not saying everybody fares well, [that] CPAP works with everyone. Start them on CPAP and try to keep them on CPAP as much as you can.”Another non-invasive option is a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers oxygen via a two-pronged tube fitted to the nose rather than via a mask as with CPAP. But both methods can potentially aerosolize virus particles, sending them into the air. That is not a threat to COVID-19 patients, but could constitute a considerable danger to those not infected with the disease, including health-care workers and first responders—especially those running short of personal protective equipment.In Kirkland, Washington, county health officials postulated that paramedics may have inadvertently furthered the spread of coronavirus when they employed CPAP machines to treat residents of the Life Care Center nursing home—where dozens eventually died.Angus said on a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) podcast last week that the jury is still out on whether the high-flow nasal cannula could pose a similar problem.“We have not worked out at this point exactly how safe that is,” he said.Further complicating the question of when to intubate is the deceptive and mercurial nature of COVID-19. A bad turn can come just as quickly as a new one.Greg Neyman, an emergency physician in New Jersey, has noted that COVID-19 patients can appear to be in little distress at oxygen levels that ordinarily would have people gasping for breath and maybe tearing off their air mask. Instead, COVID-19 patients can appear to be “just a little fluish.”“It’s something we’re not used to in emergency medicine and critical care,” Neyman told The Daily Beast.President Trump Insists New York Will Be ‘Fine,’ Won’t Need Extra VentilatorsThe coronavirus patient’s lungs continue to function mechanically. But even as they inhale and exhale, inflating and deflating their lungs, they can be hypoxic, or short of oxygen in the blood. The lungs may work, but the oxygen does not reach them.  And there is a concern that an exhausted and overwhelmed medical staff might fail to note ongoing labored breathing. “How safely can we use non-invasive ventilation?” Angus asked the JAMA podcast. “It would be terrible if [a patient] had acute respiratory failure without someone able to get to the bedside and intubate.”Because COVID-19 can worsen so precipitously, doctors may have only a small window in which to make the decision to intubate.When the time comes, Garrone asks the patient—who is generally still conscious and cognizant—for verbal consent before inducing a coma from which they have a painfully low chance of emerging.“I don’t think they are aware of how the odds are against them and it would be very harsh of us, almost cruel, to tell them,” Garrone told The Daily Beast. “Besides, when they are proposed with intubation there is really no other reasonable course of action left.”Doctors are trying to figure out new courses of action in real time, as their ICUs fill up and their ventilator supplies run low. Researchers are racing to analyze the outcomes to better inform the decision-making process.“We don’t know enough yet,” said Angus. “We want more data.”He offered a comparison of the fight we face with brand new COVID-19.“Trench warfare in the First World War,” he said.But in truth, the life-and-death decisions on the battlefield were simple compared to those faced by ICU doctors. Even when hospitals have enough ventilators.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Boris Johnson has received oxygen treatment after being admitted to hospital for 'persistent symptoms of coronavirus'

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Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'

Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued some dire warnings since the early days of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus, but on Sunday he indicated some steps taken by the U.S. federal government and states might be paying off -- both in terms of curbing the spread and preparing the health-care system for an onslaught of patients.New York City remains the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, and its hospitals are struggling. Gottlieb reiterated the predication made by numerous officials that the city, and New York state, are on the verge of peaking next week, which will undoubtedly stretch the health-care system thin. But he said he, ultimately, he thinks there will be enough ventilators for severe COVID-19 patients thanks to a historic effort to expand their supply, preventing New York from going past its tipping point.> The New York healthcare system "will be right on the brink" \- strained - "but won't go over" @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan . He adds, "I don't think they will run out of ventilators." pic.twitter.com/AhnAanf4rN> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020As for the rest of the country, Gottlieb believes mitigation efforts like social distancing are "clearly working," as case rates slow in northern states, though he's concerned the next set of hot spots will be in the South. > "Mitigation is clearly working," @ScottGottliebMD tells @margbrennan, but notes that states in the Sunbelt - across the south - are going to be the next hotspots in the United States. pic.twitter.com/wD4q1Z5yUf> > -- Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) April 5, 2020More stories from theweek.com 5 funny cartoons about social distancing Trump is using the states as scapegoats for his coronavirus calamity 5 brutally funny cartoons about Trump's TV ratings boast


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Oil prices decline $3 a barrel as market remains uncertain on supply outlook

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During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health Workers

During a Pandemic, an Unanticipated Problem: Out-of-Work Health WorkersAs hospitals across the country brace for an onslaught of coronavirus patients, doctors, nurses and other health care workers -- even in emerging hot spots -- are being furloughed, reassigned or told they must take pay cuts.The job cuts, which stretch from Massachusetts to Nevada, are a new and possibly urgent problem for a business-oriented health care system whose hospitals must earn revenue even in a national crisis. Hospitals large and small have canceled many elective services -- often under state government orders -- as they prepare for the virus, sending revenues plummeting.That has left trained health care workers sidelined, even in areas around Detroit and Washington, where infection rates are climbing, and even as hard-hit hospitals are pleading for help."I'm 46. I've never been on unemployment in my life," said Casey Cox, who three weeks ago worked two jobs, one conducting sleep research at the University of Michigan and another as a technician at the St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea Hospital near Ann Arbor, Michigan. Within a week, he had lost both.Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York has begged doctors and other medical workers from around the country to come to the city to help in areas where the coronavirus is overwhelming hospitals."Unless there is a national effort to enlist doctors, nurses, hospital workers of all kinds and get them where they are needed most in the country in time, I don't see, honestly, how we're going to have the professionals we need to get through this crisis," de Blasio said Friday morning on MSNBC.And the Department of Veterans Affairs is scrambling to hire health care workers for its government-run hospitals, especially in hard-hit New Orleans and Detroit, where many staff members have fallen ill. The department moved to get a federal waiver to hire retired medical workers to beef up staff levels.But even as some hospitals are straining to handle the influx of coronavirus patients, empty hospital beds elsewhere carry their own burden."We're in trouble," said Gene Morreale, the chief executive of Oneida Health Hospital in upstate New York, which has not yet seen a surge in coronavirus patients.Governors in dozens of states have delivered executive orders or guidelines directing hospitals to stop nonurgent procedures and surgeries to various degrees. Last month, the U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome M. Adams, also implored hospitals to halt elective procedures.That has left many health systems struggling to survive.Next week, Morreale said, Oneida will announce that it is putting 25% to 30% of its employees on involuntary furlough. They will have access to their health insurance through June. Physicians and senior staff at the hospital have taken a 20% pay cut."We've been here 121 years, and I'm hoping we're still there on the other side of this," Morreale said.Appalachian Regional Healthcare, a 13-hospital system in eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, has seen a 30% decrease in its overall business because of a decline in patient volume and services related to the pandemic. Last week, the hospital system announced it would furlough about 8% of its workforce -- around 500 employees.Hospital executives across the country are cutting pay while also trying to repurpose employees for other jobs.At Intermountain Healthcare, which operates 215 clinics and 24 hospitals in Utah, Idaho and Nevada, about 600 of the 2,600 physicians, physicians assistants and registered nurses who are compensated based on volume will see their pay dip by about 15%, said Daron Cowley, a company spokesman.Those reductions are tied to the drop in procedures, which has fallen significantly for some specialties, he said. The organization is working to preserve employment as much as possible, in part by trying to deploy 3,000 staff members into new roles."You have an endoscopy tech right now that may be deployed to be at hospital entrances" where they would take the temperatures of people coming in, Cowley explained.In Boston, a spokesman for Partners HealthCare, with 12 hospitals, including Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's, said staff members whose work has decreased are being deployed to other areas or will be paid for up to eight weeks if no work is available.But redeployment is not always an option. Janet Conway, a spokeswoman for Cape Fear Valley Health System in Fayetteville, North Carolina, said many of the company's operating room nurses trained in specialized procedures have been furloughed because their training did not translate to other roles."Those OR nurses, many have never worked as a floor nurse," she said.Conway said nearly 300 furloughed staff members have the option to use their paid time off, but beyond that, the furlough would be unpaid. Most employees are afforded 25 days per year.Some furloughed hospital workers are likely to be asked to return as the number of coronavirus cases rise in their communities. But the unpredictable virus has offered little clarity and left hospitals, like much of the economy, in a free fall.Many health systems are making direct cuts to their payrolls, eliminating or shrinking performance bonuses and prorating paychecks to mirror reduced workload until operations stabilize.Scott Weavil, a lawyer in California who counsels physicians and other health care workers on employment contracts, said he was hearing from doctors across the country who were being asked to take pay cuts of 20% to 70%.The requests are coming from hospital administrators or private physician groups hired by the hospitals, he said, and are essentially new contracts that doctors are being asked to sign.Many of the contracts do not say when the cuts might end, and are mostly affecting doctors who are not treating coronavirus patients on the front lines, such as urologists, rheumatologists, bariatric surgeons, obstetricians and gynecologists.Such doctors are still being asked to work -- often in a decreased capacity -- yet may be risking their health going into hospitals and clinics."It's just not sitting well," Weavil said, noting that he tells doctors they unfortunately have few options if they want to work for their institution long term."If you fight this pay cut, administration could write your name down and remember that forever," he said he tells them.In other cases, physicians are continuing to find opportunities to practice in a more limited capacity, like telemedicine appointments. But that has not eliminated steep pay cuts."Physicians are only paid in our clinic based on their productivity in the work they do," said Dr. Pam Cutler, the president of Western Montana Clinic in Missoula. "So they're automatically taking a very significant -- usually greater than 50% or 25% -- pay cut just because they don't have any work."In some areas, layoffs have left behind health care workers who worry that they will not be able to find new roles or redeploy their skills.Cox in Michigan said he was briefly reassigned at his hospital, helping screen and process patients coming in with coronavirus symptoms, but eventually the people seeking reassignments outgrew the number of roles.He also expressed concern that inevitable changes in the health care industry after the pandemic -- paired with the possibility of a lengthy period of unemployment -- could make it difficult to get his job back."I'm just concerned that the job I got laid off from may not be there when this is over," Cox said. "The longer you're away, the more you worry, 'Am I going to be able to come back?' So there's a lot of anxiety about it."Even as many of the largest hospital networks grapple with sudden financial uncertainty, much smaller practices and clinics face a more immediate threat.According to a statistical model produced by HealthLandscape and the American Academy of Family Physicians, by the end of April, nearly 20,000 family physicians could be fully out of work, underemployed or reassigned elsewhere, particularly as cities like New York consider large-scale, emergency reassignments of physicians."Many of these smaller practices were living on a financial edge to start with, so they're not entering into this in a good position at all," said Dr. Gary Price, the president of the Physicians Foundation. "Their margins are narrower, their patients don't want to come in, and many of them shouldn't anyway, so their cash flow has been severely impacted and their overhead really hasn't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company